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Julie R Long Gallegos - Jewelry Gallery


#1

Gaslight Original Beadwork
San Francisco, CA. USA

Using a variety of on-and off-loom weaving techniques and metalsmithing, I create beaded jewelry and accessories. Influenced by San Francisco's Victorian, Edwardian, Art Deco and Psychedelic eras, I channel these styles into my work. I create for modern, busy women who know how to accessorize and who want their jewelry to express their love of the past, and their love of the beauty around them. I've been holding a needle and thread since childhood. Adulthood has brought the me the joy of learning to hold a hammer and jeweler's torch. I thank my mother, sister, grandmothers and women friends who have shared their skills with me over the years



Materials: Japanese seed beads, silverite briolettes, oxidized sterling silver, needle and thread Dimensions: 44"L x .5" (necklace); 1.25"L x .75" (earrings)

Matte ivory glass and 24K gold-plated xize 10 Japanese seed beads are crocheted with silverite (corundum) briolettes in a Mediterranean-influenced continuous necklace; the earrings are needle-woven in size 15 Japanese glass and 24K gold-plated seed beads, around hand-shaped wooden forms, and set in hand fabricated oxidized sterling silver bezels.

Photo credit: George Post


#2

Pearl Kiss Loom work bracelet

Materials: Czech and Japanese seed beads, oxidized sterling silver, freshwater pearls, needle and thread
Dimensions: 2.5" W x 9"L

Loom work in motifs inspired by Klimt’s “The Kiss” are incorporated into the weaving design. The clasp to which the loom work is stitched, is hand fabricated sterling silver set with golden freshwater pearls in fine sliver bezels.

Photo credit: George Post


#3

Beads for an Easter Bracelet

Materials: Japanese seads beads, gemstones, wooden forms, needle and thread
Dimensions: 1.25"H x .75"W

size 15/0 glass Japanese seed beads are needle-woven around wooden forms and finished with gemstones including coral, freshwater pearls, aventurine and carnelian.

Photo credit: George Post