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Is it a Ruby, Is it an Emerald, Is it a sapphire?


#1

All, These are the big three in colored stones. Ruby, emerald, and
sapphire. Do you not find it odd that we cannot describe exactly
what differentiates between a ruby and a red sapphire, a Colombian
emerald and an African green beryl, and Kashmir blue sapphire and a
Ceylon blue sapphire. Accurate identification is a must to make the
colored stone market have any degree of credibility. There needs to
be a standard set. One that can be conclusively tested and one which
will have accountability. I have my own opinion, you have yours. To
establish credibility the object stone needs to be identified with
strict criteria which can be conclusively measured and the results
need to be certified. The individual issuing the certification needs
to sign the certificate and be held individually responsible for the
proper identification. I know all the arguments against this. For
the buying public conclusive identification using a universal
standard and accountability are what is missing in the gemstone
industry. What are your ideas?

Gerry Galarneau


#2
    All, These are the big three in colored stones.  Ruby, emerald,
and sapphire.  Do you not find it odd that we cannot describe
exactly what differentiates between a ruby and a red sapphire, a
Colombian emerald and an African green beryl, and Kashmir blue
sapphire and a Ceylon blue sapphire.  Accurate identification is a
must to make the colored stone market have any degree of
credibility.  There needs to be a standard set.  One that can be
conclusively tested and one which will have accountability. I have
my own opinion, you have yours.  To establish credibility the object
stone needs to be identified with strict criteria which can be
conclusively measured and the results need to be certified.  The
individual issuing the certification needs to sign the certificate
and be held individually responsible for the proper identification.
I know all the arguments against this.  For the buying public
conclusive identification using a universal standard and
accountability are what is missing in the gemstone industry. What
are your ideas? 

Dear Gerry, I agree that for selling , having a consistent measuring
stick to gauge by would be most helpful. In the colored stone world
there is no DeBeers to impose a grading standard and the standards
from GIA are so nearsighted as to be useless. GIA’s got to walk a
tight rope between the big markets and slants it’s color stone
standards to help with emerald sales ( in particular). When I sell a
stone I sell it’s cut and use of the cut to enhance color.-this is for
top end buyers. For mid to low range I sell commercial cutting again
based on color. I love colored stones and find selling the "big three"
a huge advantage due to historic marketing. But, my heart is in
morganite and tourmaline and the like. When I make things for my own
soul I use what is pretty. When I want to make money I stick to the
conservative line. Oh, well. Sam , Tucson