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Internet Diamond Problems


#1

A young gent, known to me for many years, he was a Chinese Exchange
Student, living in my home from age 16 into College. He is planning
his wedding, and asked me for advice and assistance. I referred him
to Jay Whaley, also known to me, as both my Jewelry Teacher, and a
Master Craftsman.

Despite strong suggestions against it from me, he decided to
purchase the Center Diamond from an online Diamond Dealer. He
overlooked his own misgivings, after asking the selling company to
ship directly to GIA, with the GIA Certificate, in order to
determine, if indeed this is the same stone GIA Certified some years
ago. The company refused to do this.

I made a call, at my friend’s request and spoke with the "Manager"
who reiterated, they would not ship to GIA. I asked her just what
proof he had that he delivered exactly the diamond they shipped to
him to GIA. Her answer was “the certificate is the proof.”

Well the Diamond arrived and was taken to GIA, and no, it is not the
Diamond on the Certificate. So now what? Jay Whaley has the side
diamonds and the bands are ready, except for the center stone. My
friend is out of contact at the moment, in Vancouver, and the
wedding will be in China shortly.

I also called Blue Nile with the proposal that a diamond purchased
from them, with a GIA certificate, be shipped directly to GIA for
verification. They said that it was not usual, but if that was the
customer’s request, they would honor it.

The stone is in the 7 to 8K price range. I have for the moment
misplaced my original notes, but however does one prove which stone
was actually shipped?

Thanks and Hugs,
Terrie


#2

Unless you’re dealing with a flawless diamond, and I’m pretty
certain you’re not, the noted inclusions on a certificate should act
as proper identification of the stone. Additionally the stone
measurements, when added to the inclusions should provide definitive
proof. I’ve never seen what you are describing actually happen before
(doesn’t mean it hasn’t, can’t or won’t) but it is a bit unusual to
ship a stone back to GIA for a confirmation. Any jeweler with a
microscope and a few good measuring instruments should be able to
confirm the stone’s identity. Personally this is one of the reasons I
don’t think people should buy online when they’re investing so much
money, but then everyone is always out looking for a bargain.

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
www.spirerjewelers.com


#3

Teresa

Have them seal the diamond with a micro-film to the GIA certificate.
Hoping the diamond was plotted for inclusions at the same time…GIA
does this plotting!..also “Internet diamond buyers, beware”…If the
manager refuse to certify, that was a major ‘red-flag’ for you…

Gerry!


#4
The stone is in the 7 to 8K price range. I have for the moment
misplaced my original notes, but however does one prove which stone
was actually shipped? 

You take it to a GG appraiser who grades the stone you have and
gives you a report telling you all the ways the stone does not match
the GIA cert. provided.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#5

Terrie,

How did the young man pay for the diamond? If by credit card, the
solution is simple. Contest the sale as fraudulent, done.

Also, a call to the FBI will send him to their web site where they
happily, quickly and very efficiently deal with internet fraud. It’s
fraud by wire and the penalties are severe. No attorneys required.
Also, if ANY part of this transaction involved the US Mail, they,
too, deal with these things in a serious manner.

Wayne


#6
but however does one prove which stone was actually shipped? 

Nothing irks me more than a quick-buck artist destroying reputation
of all the jewelers.

File a civil suit against the company. Civil claim does not requires
proof beyond the shadow of doubt. All you have to show is that
preponderance of the evidence slants in your favor.

Once civil claim is filed, you have a right to conduct discovery. You
can supine their customer list and once you have that, contact each
customer and inquire if it happen to someone else. Odds are that it
did. Once you establish pattern of practice you can take them to the
cleaners. Chances are they will return your money long before that,
so the diamond can be purchased from a reputable source.

Also, if they used US Mail for delivery, they can prosecuted for
mail fraud. If it crossed the state boundary, it becomes a Federal
issue. Talk to an attorney. Those crooks are not in a clear as they
may think.

Leonid Surpin.


#7

Hi Teresa,

after asking the selling company to ship directly to GIA, with the
GIA Certificate, in order to determine, if indeed this is the same
stone GIA Certified some years ago. The company refused to do this. 

This should have been a HUGE Red Flag! I worked directly for a
diamond broker for many years, and I still work with this same
broker. I sell many loose diamonds, mostly by special request, from
my website www.bestcutgems.com, both certified and uncertified. I
have never had anyone question my reputation. Only buy from someone
with a good reputation. In business reputation is everything. I hope
you told GIA where you purchased this diamond with the bogus
certificate because GIA can bring their wrath down on them.

Linda McMurray G.G., A.J.P. (GIA)
Best Cut Gems
www.bestcutgems.com


#8

The cynical side of me wonders…

Ok, if they DID ship to GIA for verification, and GIA confirms and
returns the stone to the seller and they forward to you, ( I’d have a
hard time seeing GIA or any other lab, shipping to a third party)
what makes you think you will STILL be assured of getting the right
stone? Couldn’t the seller switch after the GIA confirm?

You need independent verification. Done in such a way as to be able
to refute the seller’s possible defense that the ‘verifier’ switched
the stone.

You’ve gotten excellent advice from the forum as far as what to do
next. Good luck with it.

BTW, how far off the cert was the stone in question?


#9

Well,

The diamond in question was returned to the company that
misrepresented it. A refund has been made. the wedding will be held
in China with a substitute ring. The “real” one will happen later.

Thanks to all that responded. What a mess.

Hugs,
Terrie