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Info needed


#1

Hi, all

I have two totally separate questions to ask:

  1. I have an old gents two tone ring. The top plate isa
    die-struck white gold plate with 5 diamonds (round) in it. It
    was one of those pre-cleaned out plates that can fit various size
    diamonds; one drills a seat and uses a heavy flat or round
    graver and sets the stones. Anyway, the plate is very tarnished,
    and I need to polish it bright and possibly rhodium the top
    again. The problem is that the diamonds are in the way, and if I
    attempt to take them out, I will amost surely break one or more
    beads off. I tried cyanide, to no avail. Should I try to bomb?
    Electro strip?

  2. I’ve often encountered old heavy 14kt gents covered pocket
    watches that we repair and restore. Luckily for me, I’ve never
    had to repair a hinge. How in heaven;'s name does one repair a
    hinge on such a heavy case? the tubing is so incredibly thin, and
    one hinge for the outside cover lays right ontop of the back dust
    cover hinge, and then another hinge for the rear cover. To me,
    this is amazing. Anybody know how one would proceed in
    repairing, let alone making such a thing??

Regards, Allan Freilich


#2

I’m surprised that the cyanide didn’t work. I’d now suspect that
I might actually be facing oxidation. Electro-stripping will
remove it. It will also attack the prongs and probably dull any
white surfaces. Use care.

I served the bulk of my apprenticeship doing bangle bracelet and
pocket watch repairs. As far as I’m concerned, the only trick is
to draw the tubing down to the correct size. The old tubing can
be unsoldered. If the case is really heavy, double check on the
quality. I’d suspect gold filled. Gold filled repairs very much
like gold except that it requires more heat as the base metal
conducts heat a lot quicker(a whole lot like silver).


#3
1.  I have an old gents two tone ring.  The top plate isa
die-struck white gold plate with 5 diamonds (round) in it.  It
was one of those pre-cleaned out plates that can fit various
size diamonds; one drills a seat and uses a heavy flat  or round
graver and sets the stones. Anyway, the plate is very tarnished,
and I need to polish it bright and possibly rhodium the top
again. The problem is that the diamonds are in the way, and if I
attempt to take them out, I will amost surely break one or more
beads off.  I tried cyanide, to no avail.  Should I try to bomb?
Electro strip?

The art of polishing with a variety of shaped brushes… I’ve
never run across an old cluster head I couldn’t polish. The trick
is using a variety of of old and reshaped and altered end and
wheel brushes. You can do it. The old rhodium might be giving you
some trouble however, you might want to put the ring in some
boiling sulphuric acid to remove it as it won’t polish worth a
darn. Mechanical polishing is the only way I know of restoring a
beat up and discolored setting. hint; take a saw to an end brush,
cutting the bristles back to where only about 10% are left (in
the center), try doing the same with a circular brush, be
creative… :slight_smile:

2.   I've often encountered old heavy 14kt gents covered pocket
watches that we repair and restore.  Luckily for me, I've never
had to repair a hinge. How in heaven;'s name does one repair a
hinge on such a heavy case? the tubing is so incredibly thin,
and one hinge for the outside cover lays right ontop of the back
dust cover hinge, and then another hinge for the rear cover.  To
me, this is amazing.  Anybody know how one would proceed in
repairing, let alone making such a thing??

There are books that detail the step by step process, if you
need to know how, I recommend getting one. Otherwise, when you DO
get one in for repair and YOU have to do it, post then and I can
help. It’s not as hard as it looks, but there are some tricky
parts… (like the case warping so badly it won’t shut
anymore…) Any time you need to do tubing work, consider heat
sinking the tubing by inserting drill rod or some such, it’s very
helpful. >

Jeffrey


#4

Ive been building some hinges lately in sterling models for some
pieces that are similar to lockets. I bought a set of short
steel rods of various small mm diameters that are a Vigor watch
material assortment (pins for watch bands ?), and I use them to
align the hinges during soldering. The process has worked well
with both pairs of knuckle hinges and continuous tube hinges.
Hadn’t thought about the heat sink property, though. Good point.

Rick Hamilton
Richard D. Hamilton, Jr
http://www.rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton


#5

Did you try yellow rouge on a small end brush?


#6

1.try either tarnex or silver magic.If neither of these work,try
red rouge on an end brush or a tooth pick.Methods that use
cyanide are too dangerous and not effective enough to warrent the
risk.

2.Torch control is essential.Try soldering with a graphite
pencil lead in the hinge tube.Use only enough flame to do the
job.Heat the thickest part,and let the heat transfer to the
thinner tubing.Good luck.

             Scott Hepner