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[How2] Touch up the back of foilback stones


#1

Does anyone know how to touch up the back of foilback stones…
Any ideas. I’ve tried tester paint, stains, doesn’t work.
Thank-you for the help with stone suppliers and suppliers for
filagree stampings… Donna


#2

Thank you so much for the method of replacing the foil on the
stones or touching up. I will try it and this really sounds like
it will work. What a great group to belong too. I might be
getting a computer in a couple days and going off webtv. I will
let you know if this takes place. Thank You. Donna


#3

Hi Donna: How about the quicksilver stuff used on the back of
mirrors. Would a glass & mirror company supply it?
Andrea/Guyot


#4

Donna, I haven’t actually tried this but the idea came to mind.
How about mixing some of the new very fine dust glitter
available at some art and craft stores with the glue you use for
the stones? I have experience with costume jewelry and I am
ssuming you are using vintage stones for your project. That is
what I would try. Every paint I tried before, including sprays
and metallic markers just does not work. Just a thought… Please
let me know, off list if you want, how it worked out. Good luck!
Vera @Acquamarin


#5

I hope I don’t sound facetious, and it may be unavoidable, but
here goes . . .

Have you got too much time on your hands? :slight_smile:

Those things are pennies per dozen at places like Ben Franklin,
Wal Mart craft section, etc. I think even Rio and Stuller carry
them. Please don’t bother with them, unless you are doing some
kind of restoration work on semi-antique costume jewelry.
Anything is possible, however, and I have ideas, but I’ve just
got to see the response to this one.

David L. Huffman (member in good standing of foil-backs
anonymous)


#6
Does anyone know how to touch up the back of foilback stones...
Any ideas.  I've tried tester paint, stains, doesn't work.

G’day Donna: it is possible to chemically deposit bright
silver over almost any object including using a
similar technique to that used for making mirrors or silvering
the inner walls of thermos flasks. However, it is very tricky;
the object must be scrupulously chemically clean, and the
solutions can stain clothes and flesh, and if left for a while,
silver fulminate - a teribly sensitive explosive - can be
generated. I can provide the formula and method, but you’d need
experience with corrosive chemicals. The silver film is
extremely thin but fully reflective, and must be protected with a
coat of shellac or similar paint exactly like mirrors. Still
want to try it? John Burgess.


#7

David Huffman: Yes, I do restore estate jewelry for antique shops
and jewelry stores. Also these stones are apart of my bussiness,
designing pins out of estate jewelry… and my other bussiness
where I use pieces of estate jewelry. I, alot of times, find
stones that are unique and different and couldn’t use them
because the foil was bad… they can’t be replaced. Hobby shops
and variety stores, don’t cut it… Rio has given up foilback
stones. Thanks to the wonderful people of orchid I am getting
new suppliers for these stones… Since I lost most of mine in
the New Years Eve fire in my shop…I learned this along time
ago, that one person’s junk is another person’s treasure…I
love cut glass… Donna


#8

I’m not really knowledgeable about the old foilback stones, but
am wondering whether or not it might be possible, if the foil
remnants could not somehow just be removed, and then the stone
entirely re-foiled; rather than trying to touch it up? I realize
I am naive about this, but it did occur to me. Margaret
@Margaret_Malm


#9
am wondering whether or not it might be possible, if the foil
remnants could not somehow just be removed, .....

G’day. If the original foil was silver leaf, or chemical
silvering, then you will have to use nitric acid (about 50%) or
simply scrape it. If it was aluminium foil or evaporated
aluminium, then a dunking in a warm solution of caustic soda
(sodium hydroxide) or a warm strong solution of washing soda
(sodium carbonate - NOT bicarbonate) There are books which give
details on the application of gold or silver leaf, or if you want
to go to a lot of bother, use a chemical silvering method as is
used for silvering mirrors. I’ll send you the formula if you
really want. Cheers, – John Burgess Johnb@ts.co.nz


#10
Yes, I do restore estate jewelry for antique shops and jewelry
stores. 

Glad I apologized in advance. I get foil backs from Stuller,
which carries the standard fare in sizes 1-4 mm. I’ve tried
various paints, no luck. Rub-and-Buff and a coating of clear
acrylic works a little better. I haven’t tried actually using
foil like they use for gold/silver leaf. There are inexpensive
versions of that made of non-precious alloys. I’ll give it a
try and see what it looks like. As for John Burgess’s method,
with silver fulminate, I’ve seen something along those lines
done for silvering the inside of glass Christmas ornaments using
silver nitrate. Perhaps I’m mistaken about this. Good luck, if
I find anything usefull, I’ll pass it along.

David L. Huffman


#11
 As for John Burgess's method, with silver fulminate, I've seen
something along those lines done for silvering the inside of glass
Christmas ornaments using silver nitrate.  Perhaps I'm mistaken
about this.  Good luck, if I find anything usefull, I'll pass it
along. 

G’day; Correct - this method is used for silvering those glass
ornaments, thermos bottles, and mirrors professionally. The method
I mentioned (not MINE, you understand!) does indeed give rise to
silver fulminate, a sensitive explosive, but it has been used since
before Victorian times on millions of articles, and is safe if one
knows what one is doing. I have used it in the distant past (50
years ago!) However, Silver nitrate on it’s own won’t work; it needs
a reducing agent which will precipitate silver in a fine film.
Cheers –

        /\      John Burgess
       / /
      / /      Johnb@ts.co.nz
     / /__|\
    (_______)