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Hot water and investment


#1

Hey who was it that just tried hot water in investment? Never heard back if
your casting was full of bubbles? Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html


#2

Dave Stephens wrote:

Hey who was it that just tried hot water in investment? Never heard back if
your casting was full of bubbles? Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html

I did reply by saying that the castings turned out beautiful.
thank for the tip ,Kris Kringle


#3

Dave Stephens wrote:

Hey who was it that just tried hot water in investment? Never heard back if
your casting was full of bubbles? Dave

Ever tried to invest at high altitudes? Marc Robinson (FineGold in So.
CA) developed a method of using 130 degree water in a thin investment
mixture. The solution will boil violently at 26" of mercury! If you mix
it too thick, it will set up too quickly. Marc demonstrated the process
for a few of us at the 1985 MJSA show in Long Beach. The trick is to mix
it for 6 minutes. The castings come out just fine… I do it all the
time, expecially for fast casting…

         Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone fine jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Cad jewelry design, cad/cam milling scroll filigree…
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250


#4

Might add my two carats here and most investments tell the working time
for various temperatures of water.At least the last time that I looked
they carried instructions along those lines…Air temperature also has
a considerable effect on the rate at which it sets and again see the
instructions.I am at about 600 feet altitude which is low but mine tends
to begin to boil with cold water at 26-27*.It seems to me as though the
lower the outside barometric pressure or the higher the humidity the
more of a vacuum I have to pull to boil it.Anyone else know about this?
I think I have it correctly stated…Gavin


#5

Dave,

I’m not sure what affect hot water will have on bubbles in investment,
but I do know that heat acts as an accelerator and will cause the
investment to set up quicker. If you need time to work during the
investing process, be careful.

Richard


#6

the only thing that hot water will do to your investment is speed up the
setting time fairly drastically… The best way to invest is to use tap water
at the temp that it comes out of your tap… My castings are always silky
smooth…using this method that is… I have heard of the hot water investment
mixing and I don’t like the sounds of it, the investment will never really get
the time needed to FULLY mix or debubilize… Stick to the regular way… You
will only be looking at headaches with hot water… (this is however, just
my opinion… ) Don’t fix it if it ain’t broken…From: owner-orchid@proteus.imagiware.com on behalf of Dave Stephens
Sent: Tuesday, November 05, 1996 7:24 PM
To: orchid@GANOKSIN.COM
Subject: hot water and investment

Hey who was it that just tried hot water in investment? Never heard back if
your casting was full of bubbles? Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html

procedures


#7

Hot water investing was deveoped for high altitude investing, and it has
other uses as well. Investment is designed to work best at certain
proportions, but there is a lot of latitude. If your vacuum pump isn’t
pulling effectively, you can use the hot water method until you get it
fixed… and yes, it can help with bubbles in the mix…

Thomas Williams wrote:

the only thing that hot water will do to your investment is speed up the
setting time fairly drastically… The best way to invest is to use tap water
at the temp that it comes out of your tap… My castings are always silky
smooth…using this method that is… I have heard of the hot water investment
mixing and I don’t like the sounds of it, the investment will never really get
the time needed to FULLY mix or debubilize… Stick to the regular way… You
will only be looking at headaches with hot water… (this is however, just
my opinion… ) Don’t fix it if it ain’t broken…

         Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone fine jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Cad jewelry design, cad/cam milling scroll filigree…
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250


#8

Dave Stephens wrote:

Hey who was it that just tried hot water in investment? Never heard back if
your casting was full of bubbles? Dave

Ever tried to invest at high altitudes? Marc Robinson (FineGold in So.
CA) developed a method of using 130 degree water in a thin investment
mixture. The solution will boil violently at 26" of mercury! If you mix
it too thick, it will set up too quickly. Marc demonstrated the process
for a few of us at the 1985 MJSA show in Long Beach. The trick is to mix
it for 6 minutes. The castings come out just fine… I do it all the
time, expecially for fast casting…

Jeffrey, just what IS the advantage of mixing thing and hot? Missing
something here…Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html


#9

I saw a tape by Marc Robinson of Fine Gold, whom Jeffrey mentions. The idea
of hot water investing (130 F) according to Marc’s tape it to insure
complete chemical processing of investment, a more vigorous boiling for
removing bubbles, and to insure that the investment is truly starting to
set up in 10 minutes. I do my investment times by the book and his method
has worked for me. Faster setup time reduces the possibility of water
separation. He also claims that hot water investing strengthens the
investment tremendously.

I was truly surprised that the investment does not set up prematurely
(sooner than 10 minutes), however one must be accurate in their processing
times.

Kenneth Gastineau
gastin@mis.net


#10

Jeffrey, just what IS the advantage of mixing thin and hot? Missing
something here…Dave

solves problems associated with high altitude, poor vacuuum etc…

         Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone fine jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Cad jewelry design, cad/cam milling scroll filigree…
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250