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Hobby Drills


#1

Hi, this is my first real posting to this list, so I hope it’s
not a stupid one!

I wouls like to buy a small hobby drill to try my hand at a few
things, mainly using burrs and fine drills. I can’t afford a
pendant drill, and anyway don’t have the space for one, so my
choice really comes down to a Dremel type drill. My father has a
Dremel, so trying that out shouldn’t be difficult, but I wondered
if anyone on the list has any experience of the Como drill. It’s
a lot cheaper than the Dremel, is it as good? As I said, my
requirements aren’t too demanding, so if it’s suitable for light
use, then it’s probably OK for me.

Second question: I know what the round and the pointed burrs are
for, but what do you use the little flame-shaped burrs for? Can
anyone spare the effort to quickly summarise the different types
and their uses and suggest a few sizes and styles to buy for a
complete beginner.

Thanks,

Alex
Alex Ball
Electron Microscope Unit
The Natural History Museum
London SW7 9BD

Tel 0171 938 8973/9348
Fax 0171 938 9268


#2
 I wondered if anyone on the list has any experience of the
Como drill. It's a lot cheaper than the Dremel, is it as good? 

I don’t have experience with a Como drill, but the one similar
to a Dremel which I like better is a Ryobi. It has a variable
speed, less vibration than a Dremel, and it doesn’t have that
annoying whine at the high speeds. You can get a complete setup
for the Ryobi for under $50, just the drill itself for about $30
(U.S. dollars). I’ve had mine for 2 yrs. running, heavy use, and
it’s finally got a brush going out. Dremels haven’t held up that
well for me. Has slightly lower speed than a Dremel, but higher
torque.

   I know what the round and the pointed burrs are for, but
what do you use the little flame-shaped burrs for? 

Depends on what you’re going to be using them for. Metal, stone,
wax, acrylic? Jewelry, or something with your work at the museum?
Need more details. K.P.


#3

Don’t buy a Dremel. If you just need to drill, buy a handrill.
These are affordable and readily available 2nd hand (in the US),
and affordable new as well. In the US, the cost difference is
not that great between a pendant drill (flex shaft) and a Dremel
– about $50. I say look extra hard for a good deal on a pendant
drill and know that it will last 30 years or so.

Dremel motors lack the primary advantage of the pendant drill –
the Dremel’s moter is in the handpiece, which makes it heavier,
has greater vibration and less flexibility of movement.

Welcome to Orchid, Alex.

Elaine
Chicago, Illinois, US
Midwest


#4

Hi Alex,

Welcome to Orchid!

I’ve never heard of the Como drill, don’t know if it’s sold in
the US. I second Kathy’s suggestion, get a Ryobi motor tool (if
they’re sold in the UK) instead of a Dremel. The Ryobi has a
better ‘feel’ in the hand, doesn’t vibrate like the Dremel, has a
speed control that stays where you set it & has almost full
torque at slow speed. The chuck and/or collet system uses the
same sizes of tools the Dremel does. In the US The Ryobi is
$55.00-60.00 for a kit including a flex shaft & about 90+ burrs,
bits, wheels & discs.

 Can anyone spare the effort to quickly summarise the
different types and their uses and suggest a few sizes and
styles to buy for a complete beginner. 

If it were me, I’d get an assorted burr set (usually about 24
different sizes & shapes) for starters. Even with an extensive
assortment of burrs, you’ll probably find you never have quite
the right size or shape (bg). What burrs to get really depends on
the type of work you’re going to be doing.

Dave


#5
    Second question: I know what the round and the pointed
burrs are for, but what do you use the little flame-shaped
burrs for? 

Hi Alex, Round burs can be multi purpose like almost other burs,
but flame ones are generaly use by setters. Roud burs can also be
use for setting instead of flames or setting burs. Bye Vincent Guy
Audette