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Help Purchasing a Magnetic Polisher?


#1

Is there a reasonably effective pin type of polisher available for
around $300? I have a small shop and we do lots of CAD-CAM
manufacturing and I would like to invest a small amount in a pin
polisher.

Sterling VanDerwerker CG (AGS), GG (GIA)
Royal Diadem Jewelers
2130P New Garden Road
Greensboro, NC 27410


#2

Sterling,

I have the least expensive model sold by Stuller (also by Rio). It
is $200. The bowl is quite small, though, and will only accommodate
about 6 light-medium weight rings at once. This may not work for you
as you indicate that you are a manufacturer. All the prices I’ve seen
jump to about $475 for anything larger.

I’ve had my “cheapie” for 18 months, and it works great. Wouldn’t
think of going without one now, even if it has to be another small
one if/when this one dies.

Matthew Crawford
www.MatthewDesigns.com


#3
I've had my "cheapie" for 18 months, and it works great. Wouldn't
think of going without one now, even if it has to be another small
one if/when this one dies. 

I just don’t get it! I had a friend who has a magnetic polisher
finish a few cast pieces for me, to see what the machine does. I
hated them! They were bright in the recesses, yes, but the outer
surfaces had nasty little peen marks all over them which looked
awful. What is the point of these finishers? I am all for mechanical
assistance to my shop processes, but I don’t understand this one.
Could some of you enlighten me?

M’lou Brubaker
Minnesota, USA


#4

M’lou

I just don't get it! I had a friend who has a magnetic polisher
finish a few cast pieces for me, to see what the machine does. I
hated them! 

What material did you test? Softer materials, like sterling, are
subject to more of the “peening” than harder materials. I run
sterling for about half the time that I do gold…aprox 8 minutes for
sterling pieces, and 12-15 minutes for gold (depending on karat and
color). This has helped to relieve, if not completely eliminate, the
peening effect. Another consideration is in the relative amount of
"open space" in the design…Does the piece incorporate large, smooth
polished areas? Then a buffing wheel is the better choice. Are there
a lot of detailed, recessed areas? Then this is the machine for you!
I find that many items need to be both mag tumbled and buffed to
achieve the best finish. There is nothing better for polishing in a
tight space, especially convoluted filigree or multi-head pieces.

I typically finish a piece like this: File, sand through 1500 grit
paper, toss it into the mag tumbler for a few minutes (based on the
material), and then final polish on the wheel. Any slight peening
(remember, don’t over tumble!) comes out in the first grade of
polish on the wheel.

Matthew Crawford
www.MatthewDesigns.com


#5
I just don't get it! I had a friend who has a magnetic polisher
finish a few cast pieces for me, to see what the machine does. I
hated them! They were bright in the recesses, yes, but the outer
surfaces had nasty little peen marks all over them which looked
awful. 

How long did you put the pieces in for? I only use them for 10 to 20
minutes on sterling. I haven’t noticed any peening. I have the
little 4-inch model, and a 10-inch that I got after seeign how well
the smaller on worked.

Cheers,
Paul Ewing


#6

Hello, is the polisher you are talking about have a variable speed?
If so slow it down and have them try again. Also, you may only want
to leave it in for 2 or 3 minutes if it can’t be slowed down.
Another thing is the size of the rods. Frei and Borel sells them in 2
sizes. The.3 size are pretty gentle. Having said all of this, I will
have to admit that I don’t really like the look either. The
"polisher" I have is very powerful, it will ping the crap out of
things if you aren’t careful. but I use it sometimes to brighten up
certain items and work harden them a bit. It is also pretty good at
brightening up oxidized silver to a nice shiny black

Good luck,
Dennis


#7

First of all, I’ve been building magnetic tumblers now and again,
trying to get them slick enough to sell, for a few years - I’ve made
several that we use, but not quite good enough to sell. Just that I
hope to offer them in the future.

In answer to the question of what they are for, and the peened
surface and such - the peened surface means that the pieces were
overtumbled - easy enough to do. However, there’s a misconception, I
think, that magnetic tumblers are meant for finishing, which they are
not, usually. They are more for cleaning up castings, getting a
bright finish in details that would require laborious effort with
tiny little tools to get by hand. I’m sure there are people who put
out a product straight from the tumbler - when you buy "semifinished"
from Stuller, that’s what you’re getting. But real jewelry still
needs to be polished after - it just takes 1/2 as long after the
tumbler.


#8
I typically finish a piece like this: File, sand through 1500 grit
paper, toss it into the mag tumbler for a few minutes (based on the
material), and then final polish on the wheel. Any slight peening
(remember, don't over tumble!) comes out in the first grade of
polish on the wheel. 

Thanks, Matthew, that pretty well explains it for me. I work mostly
in Sterling. I think I have learned to finish and developed my style
in sync with how I finish, so that I leave recessed areas to be
oxidized, rather than polished up bright. In Sterling, they will end
up dark anyhow, in time, so I plan for that and use it to my
advantage. I think that is why I did not see the point in trying to
brighten the recessed areas; I want them dark! But I can see how
other designers with other styles and materials might feel
differently. Thanks for the info.

M’lou Brubaker
Minnesota, USA


#9

Continue from:
https://orchid.ganoksin.com/t/300-magnetic-polisher

In case you missed it, here is a web site with good on
building a magnetic tumbler.

http://tinyurl.com/huba5

I have built 4 using his drawings and photos, and they work great.

I am making another one now, using four 2 inch dia. by 1 inch thick
magnets.Pretty powerful magnets,(and dangerous if you let them get
away from you! ) good luck with your tumbler.

Andrew


#10

For anyone who isn’t machine building savvy and only needs a small
model, I just saw the Raytech CFM 400 on Gesswein’s website for
$395. I have that model and really love it. It has a limited capacity
(I think the literature said 8 to 12 rings) but might fit your needs.

Standard disclaimers. Hope this helps someone and isn’t a duplicate
post.

Linda Moughemer


#11

Hi. I’m shopping for a decent magnetic pin polisher for $875 or less. What’s the best one you have found? I have a tiny Raytech, but it is very weak. Could be the motor is going south. I’ve also seen one with 1/32 HP? That sounds like the power of a weak rabbit. Need suggestions for where to purchase and a relatively robust speed. Also cleaning reagent. There are a lot out there! I’m working in Argentium and the pin polishers really help knock off flux and the fusing skin.