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Help in taking in watch repairs


#1

Selling watch repairs is like selling internal surgery, you can’t show the customer whats going to occur inside.

But if you have some old watches or can get your watchmaker to help this will surely increase watch repair SALES, profits and closing ratios.

If you’re good with watches buy SIX broken watches

Two mechanical wind
Two self winding
Two battery operated

Take a part one of each (like picture), buy a large picture frame and a piece of foam. Take off bands.

Place on top of the foam an OPEN BACK mechanical watch and below it separate out ALL of the parts of the watch so everyone can see all of the parts with the assembled watch above it

If enough room do the same in the middle for an auto wind watch and on the “3rd column” do the same with battery one. If frame is not big enough buy 3 frames.

Press into foam and put glass frame over it.

Now you have something to TRAIN the staff with and the staff can use it for watch intake, presentations and such with customers.

Train the staff how to show the customer what potential problems and teach them typically what breaks.

Teach them if a customer says “why so much?” you can show them that the watch maker has to almost take apart 50+ pieces just to see whats the problem, clean all of the parts and put them back together again.

“Can you imagine taking apart your blender at home to give an estimate to fix each everyone?”

I’d use my price book with watch repair quotes JUST to give customers a RANGE of what the repair could be. This will make the staff feel and act confident and you’ll get higher closing ratyios for estimates.

“This could be between $135 and $225 dollars, if more than that we’ll call, shall we proceed and give this to the watchmaker?”

This alone will save the store and watchmaker grief of calling and waiting for “OK’d” watch repair estimates.

If you or your watchmaker can do this it will help a great deal.
Now you know what to do with all of the broken watches you’ve accumulated over the years (or go to eBay).

David Geller


#2

i had taught myself how to do this while serving as an apprentice. had
a list of prices, along with digital pictures doing as you described.
i did not try the picture frame idea (brilliant though) due to space
constraints… although even with an ok from the customer, youd
sometimes end up owning the watch, and have to sit on it for 3 months
before being able to sell it. some repairs you would ask yourself ,
why bother?
i had a serviceman come in with a CHEAP battery operated watch he got
from a baghdad street vendor. he insisted the movement gets replaced.
he was redeploying to afghanistan. (where he was KIA) i never sold
this watch, i tracked down his family and presented it to them. i
digress, minor repairs or battery changes work great without a picture
showing why it costs what it does. but major repairs this helps lessen
the sticker shock when customer realises whats involved. ( if they
still dont believe you,. hand them a spare screw from a movement parts
bin. im pretty sure they will realise then.
Aaron


#3

A brilliant idea. I’m a watchmaker. We waste so much time explaining things to people that it’s hard to do our work. One point I like to make is that mechanical watches have more parts than many motorcycles do.