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Heat & eyes


#1

G’day; Nelson House wrote about eye protection against infra-red
radiation from intense heat sources.

In the (very) distant days when I was engaged in the fabrication
of glassware used in science laboratories, we worked almost
entirely in Pyrex boro-silicate glass, which has a much higher
softening point than ordinary soda-glass. We used coal gas or
natural gas, and oxygen is essential - gas/compressed air isn’t
hot enough and acetylene is far too dirty. At one moment we
would be using a pencil point very hot flame and the next moment
we’d have a big brush flame to keep the whole job hot to avoid
cracking, then return to a small flame to join tubes or other
prefabricated glass parts. So one peers at the work almost as
intently as a jeweller peers at his/her work. A week of that and
yes - you begin to think about trained Labradors and a white
stick. We used clear spectacles especially made for the job - I
think it was a neodymium glass - and they filtered out all the
harmful infra-red but allowed one to see easily as they were
only a sort of pale pinkish colour. So glassblowers do see the
world through rose… Enough of that!

Only one problem (Isn’t there always?) they are very expensive,
but my Research Establishment bought mine, and I passed them on
to my successor. But ask any good optician about them, they’re
worth it in the long run…

    /\
   / /    John Burgess, 
  / /
 / //\    @John_Burgess2
/ / \ \

/ (___)
(_________)


#2
 hot enough and acetylene is far too dirty.

I was wondering why I was told acetylene was not good for
lampworking beads. Has anyone tried it?

Also, does anyone know of a good (and cheap) source for these
didium glasses? Like under 100.00. TIA

Sandi

http://www.angelfire.com/pa/bubblesbeads/index.html
Sundries for soapers gift baskets , BOTTLES & JARS
Some bottles perfect for beading!
LIFE IS GOOD! @Sandra_Good


#3

Hi Sandra,

Centaur Forge has a pair listed for $40. Catalog # 3517 48 mm.
6.00 Didymium lens safety glasses made by Fendall. To order:
800-666-9175 FAX: 414-763-8350 They have a nice variety of
safety glasses fairly reasonably priced I think. Cheers,
Elizabeth

BTW, if you buy 6 pairs they are $35 a pair. Maybe we could get
an Orchid group order together! :slight_smile:

Elizabeth C. Wilkinson
Los Alamos, NM

e-mail: @wilkinso


#4
 Also, does anyone know of a good (and cheap) source for these
didium glasses? Like under 100.00. 

Wale Apparatus has any sort of protective eye wear you could
want including lots-o-didymium spectacles. They range in price
from $30 - $90. I can’t find their e-dress right now (shop’s a
mess you know) but their phone number is 1-800-334-WALE.


#5
 was wondering why I was told acetylene was not good for
lampworking beads. Has anyone tried it? Also, does anyone know
of a good (and cheap) source for these didium glasses? Like
under 100.00.  

WHEN I took a bead making class, they used propane. I just
assumed that that would be the way to go since I’ve also seen
propane used in all the instructional tapes.

Glasses, you’re talking about the orange colored ones??? They
were offered in one of my “craft” catalogs . . . I’ll have to
look that one up, I can’t remember the name off hand. They were
about $49.95 . . .


#6
I was wondering why I was told acetylene was not good for
lampworking beads. Has anyone tried it?
Also, does anyone know of a good (and cheap) source for these
didium glasses? Like under 100.00

Good Question…I was always told Mapp gas was best, and it
does work well for me…I have asked several shops about those
clear glasses that have the protection of #5 welding goggles and
they all look at me like I’m nuts, I would like a source too.

KarenKarenworks@mediaone.net


#7

FYI…I used to enamel without them, using just clear safety
glasses to protect me from the heat which is all my prof. told me
I needed. I took an lampworking class and bought the glasses
they recomended and noticed when using them with my kiln the
strain on my eyes was greatly reduced at the end of a long firing
session. I am thinking they are the same type. Thick and
clear…but really worth the money.

Karen
Karenworks@mediaone.net


#8
  I was wondering why I was told acetylene was not good for
lampworking beads. Has anyone tried it? 

Acetylene is too dirty;… leaves black areas on lighter colors
of glass But then so does the propane from camping tanks… I
am saving for a torch tip that is propane /oxy combo.

I got a beginners kit from Lark Books a year ago Christmas -
that had the glasses in the kit… I think seperate they were $50

  • but it was a gift so I am not positive. Lark books has all
    kinds of craft related books - fun catalog. Good luck Joan

#9

Lark Books catalog offers a pair of didymium safety glasses for
49.50 Address: 50 College Street, ASheville, North CArolina
28801 Cool catalog with lots of fascinatinating crafts books


#10
     Also, does anyone know of a good (and cheap) source for
these didium glasses? Like under 100.00.

Sorry, I came in late on this conversation, but do these glasses
protect your eyes from the white light from platinum? If so I
need them! Wendy Newman ggraphix@msn.com


#11

I bought a pair of didymium glasses from Wale for platinum
welding- they work very well for me. I can wear them under my
optivisor.

Rick Hamilton
Richard D. Hamilton
Martha’s Vineyard
USA
Fabricated 14k, 18k, and platinum Jewelry
wax carving, modelmaking, jewelry photography

http://www.rick-hamilton.com


#12

Hi,
Plastic absorbs uv pretty well, but IR goes right though it.
I’m not sure how much IR a kiln at 1500 F produces, but it (IR)
is pretty hard on the eyes. Don’t know what my exposure is, but I
don’t want to take any chances, so I am going to buy a pair of
goggles before doing any more of the above. One can go
overboard, though. Sometimes I feel like I should wear safety
glasses when boiling pasta.

Cheers,
Elizabeth
Elizabeth C. Wilkinson
Los Alamos, NM
e-mail: @wilkinso


#13
  We used clear spectacles especially made for the job - I
think it was a neodymium glass - and they filtered out all the
harmful infra-red but allowed one to see easily as they were
only a sort of pale pinkish colour. 

John the neodymium glasses are definitely worth the money, They
filter out the yellow sodium flare as well, Thus making re
tipping and similar operations much easier to see.

Wayne


#14
    do these glasses protect your eyes from the white light
from platinum?  

They do not protect your eyes from infrared or ultraviolet only
the yellow sodium flare . Do not rely on them for platinum work
you will hurt your eyes.

Jim

James Binnion Metal Arts
2916 Chapman St
Oakland, CA
(510) 436-3552


@jbin


#15
   do these glasses protect your eyes from the white light from
platinum?  If so I need them!  

Wendy- The glass selectively filters out the sodium band of
yellow, and can be purchased in a dark green color as well. They
work very well- I can easily see what I am welding when working
with platinum. They are a very worthwhile purchase- I got mine
from Wale Apparatus after talking with a glass bead maker found
out about them from a post by Peter Rowe on rcj.

Rick
Richard D. Hamilton
Martha’s Vineyard
USA
Fabricated 14k, 18k, and platinum Jewelry
wax carving, modelmaking, jewelry photography

http://www.rick-hamilton.com


#16

To all

Didymium lense safety glasses do not repeat do not protect your
eyes from infrared or ultraviolet radiation from flame or hot
surfaces. They are a filter for the yellow sodium flare that you
get when heating glass. This flare is very bright and can cause
problems from staring into a bright light source and it makes it
hard to see what you are doing so it makes sense to use Didymium
lenses for this but if you are not working glass and you are
using them to protect your eyes from radation dammage cause by
long exposure to hot objects ( enameling kilns, soldering ,
forging) you are fooling yourself. There are safety lenses that
help withthis they are welding glasses the main drawback is that
they are green and dark and a pain to use when you are not
looking directly at a flame or hot object, they also throw off
your ability to judge temprature by the color of an object.
There are some gold metalized lenses that are supposed to be much
better as far as the color problem but they are very pricy and
prone to scratching due to the soft nature of the gold.

If you spend long hours looking into furnaces or at soldering
flames you should think about geting some eye protection but
there do not seem to be any wonderful solutions.

Jim


@jbin
James Binnion Metal Arts
2916 Chapman St
Oakland, CA 94601
510-436-3552


#17

The comments I made about Didymium glasses are true for the
straight Didymium lenses (they have a slightly purple tint to
the lens); if the Didymium is added to green welding lenses then
you will have more protection from the harmful effects of high
temp flame work .

Jim


@jbin
James Binnion Metal Arts
2916 Chapman St
Oakland, CA 94601
510-436-3552


#18

To all

Didymium lense safety glasses do not repeat do not protect your
eyes from infrared or ultraviolet radiation from flame or hot
surfaces. They are a filter for the yellow sodium flare that you
get when heating glass. This flare is very bright and can cause
problems from staring into a bright light source and it makes it
hard to see what you are doing so it makes sense to use Didymium
lenses for this but if you are not working glass and you are
using them to protect your eyes from radation dammage cause by
long exposure to hot objects ( enameling kilns, soldering ,
forging) you are fooling yourself. There are safety lenses that
help withthis they are welding glasses the main drawback is that
they are green and dark and a pain to use when you are not
looking directly at a flame or hot object, they also throw off
your ability to judge temprature by the color of an object.
There are some gold metalized lenses that are supposed to be
much better as far as the color problem but they are very pricy
and prone to scratching due to the soft nature of the gold.

If you spend long hours looking into furnaces or at soldering
flames you should think about geting some eye protection but
there do not seem to be any wonderful solutions.

Jim


@jbin
James Binnion Metal Arts
2916 Chapman St
Oakland, CA 94601
510-436-3552


#19

If you spend long hours looking into furnaces or at soldering
flames you should think about geting some eye protection but
there do not seem to be any wonderful solutions.

I’m been thankful for all this great info on eye protection. I
guess you need different glasses for each application. I was
hoping to cover a couple needs with one good pair of protective
glasses.

Sandi

http://www.angelfire.com/pa/bubblesbeads/index.html
Sundries for soapers gift baskets , BOTTLES & JARS
Some bottles perfect for beading!
LIFE IS GOOD! @Sandra_Good


#20
   The comments I made about Didymium glasses are true for the
straight Didymium lenses  (they have a slightly purple tint to
the lens); if the Didymium is added to green welding lenses
then you will have more protection from the harmful effects of
high temp flame work .

Jim Let me get this straight- What you’re saying is that in order
for these glasses to protect against the I/R, etc. from platinum,
they have to also have to be shaded as welding goggles? And that
if they’re not shaded as welding goggles, they won’t protect
against this? What I’m reading into this is that these glasses
are great for screening the soudium spectrum, but unless they
have the welding lense qualities they are no good for platinum.
Why not simply use welding goggles- they are certainly cheaper.
And also with welding, I believe that you strike an arc first so
you can SEE- Also why they flip up and down. Can anyone clear this
up because by now I am throughly confused about these glasses and
eye damage from wearing a not strong enough filter is a gradual
thing, ya know? Regards-