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Granulation Question


#1

To all of you how answered my question about fine silver
granulation, THANK YOU!! I appreciated the response, time and
Nina


#2

Hello all,

In addition to my interest in jewelry making, I’m also a Viking-era
re-enactor. I have seen a number of granulated pieces attributed to
the Vikings.

One piece, from Birka, Sweden (and thought to be of Eastern European
origin) is a granulated/filligreed tip for a hat. The hat resembles
a “Santa Claus” hat and the tip is cone-shaped and was attached to
the end of the point of the hat. In essence it is a
filligreed/granulated cone. I have just started to play around a bit
with granulation and can’t figure out how the granules are held to
the curved surfaces until fused since there is nothing holding them
on when the glue/flux solution burns off. Any suggestions?

Thanks,
Chris
In Rainy Ketchikan


#3
    can't figure out how the granules are held to the  curved
surfaces until fused since there is nothing holding them on when
the glue/flux solution burns off. 

Chris, I’ve wondered the same thing. The Orchidian to ask is Randy
Smith, because a large part of his website is all about granulation.
Check out this clasp made by Jean Stark:

Randy has taken her classes, so he may know how it’s done. I don’t
know how to contact Randy directly, though.

Janet


#4

If you coat the granules in copper first, the fine layer of copper
will actually assist in hanging on to the curved surface.

Make a solution of pickle, and throw a piece of steel. Steel wool
works nicely. Arrange your little granules with the “glue”, I use
15 drops of distilled water, 3 drops of Hide Rabbit Glue and 2 drops
of Batterns Flux. The copper coating is called a eutectic bonding.

The copper coating is very important, or those little granules hop
off like frogs on a hot plate.

Look at our own Ganoksin Library,

Good luck!

Karen Christians
M E T A L W E R X
50 Guinan St.
Waltham, MA 02451
Ph. 781/891-3854 Fax 3857
http://www.metalwerx.com/
Jewelry/Metalarts School & Cooperative Studio


#5

Hi All: I’ve done some vertical granulation (there is a pair of
Gold Earrings on my Gold Granulation page --(www.elegantinsects.com
) as well as on curved surfaces. The trick is to work on very
small areas at a time and to work quickly, and be very careful not
to move the piece in any way. I don’t know the scientific
explanation, but I do know that the granules don’t just fly off once
the hide glue burns off. I suspect that some kind of surface tension
remains. It is difficult and can require many repeat applications
of the granules before it is all complete. A real challenge! But
very satisfying once it is done.

Sandra
elegantbee@aol.com


#6

When granulating on a curved surface, the flux takes over holding
the granules as the glue burns off. If your mixture is not correct,
it can cause problems. Usually I use 10 drops distilled water, 2
drops batterns flux, 1 drop hide glue. I will increase the glue to 2
drops if the granules are large.

Ronda Coryell
Revere Academy of Jewelry Arts