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Got a life


#1

I have the best of all creative worlds. I am retired and create for
the joy of it. Fortunately I am able to sell what ever I create. I
probably worked 10 hours per day when I made living by creating my
art work. Now that I am retired I seem to have something to do all
day. When I work I usually schedule my time so that I have some
soldering, stone cutting and final polishing to do during the day. I
always have turned waxes that I can carve in the evening while I sit
in my easy chair. The most demanding project I have is casting. I
invest one day and burnout over night and cast the following day.
Casting can take most of the day. I spend anywhere from no hours to
12 to 14 hours per day. Most of the time I manage to spend about 6
hours per day. Lee Epperson


#2

I, too, feel SO lucky to fill my life with music and jewelry-making!

80% of my waking hours are spent involved with the
harp…teaching, rehearsing, performing or recording. But I save
every Tuesday from 9:30am to about 3pm to work in a well-equipped
jewelry studio in the next town.

It’s great having concentrated time away from home (and the phone!)
where I can get advice from an excellent teacher and other
enthusiastic students.

VIA THE LIME iMAC OF: Karen L. Strauss
www.karenstrauss.com


#3

Hi Karen, I’m a harp player too- only mine will fit in my pocket, so
I guess we’re not talking about the same kind of ‘harp’, huh? I play
live performances to audiences everyday- as I’m setting at
stoplights, or waiting in a parking lot for my wife to come out of a
store. And I have notable backup players right there in the Suburban
with me, like Eric Clapton, etc… And I often get horn applause and
’thumbs up’ from other motorists. I’ve even had people follow me to
parking lots, etc,… to ask if I give private ‘harp’ (harmonica)
lessons. But , alas, winter is approaching, and I will have to roll
my windows up till spring. And in the mean time, I will just look
like I am simply really getting into ‘chewing my fingernails’ to
people as they pass by, without any sound coming from
’The Suburban Symphony Hall’. Ed