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Goo Gone


#1

I have been reading about how some of you are using Goo Gone for a
variety of things. One subject that keeps arising is the cost of Goo
Gone. My wife and I were shopping tonight and went to a discount
outlet store called Value City. They are all over the St. Louis area ,
not sure about anywhere else though. While there I ran across 24 ounce
spray bottles of Goo Gone for $1.25 each. I bought a couple to see how
they work. It says you can dilute it with water and make 5 gallons of
solution out of on 24 ounce bottle. I assume the diluted solution is
not as handy as the straight stuff. I have used Goo Gone before , but
it was in a squeeze tube in a gel form used to clean hands. Worked
like a champ for that,and smells nice too. I also use something
called Simple Green , another citrus based cleaner solution. I use
this in my ultra sonic as well as for 90 % of my cleaning problems.
A friend of mine that works at Cerro Copper , the largest copper
product producer in the US, he told me about Simple Green a few years
back. He said Cerro buys it in 55 gallon drums for all of its clean
up. Oil, grease, whatever, they use it, and its environmentally clean.
You can dump it down the drain with no worries ( so they say) I like
it cause it works wonders, no ammonia smell like other Ultra sonic
solutions, and a gallon, that makes several gallons of useful solution
on cost me around 4 dollars after a rebate. It really does wonders
on getting rouge off in the ultra sonic.

Daniel H
St. Louis Mo


#2

Goo Gone is also great for dissolving pitch residue after chasing and
repoussee. (Thanks again Anne Hollerbach). No more burning nasty
pitch from metal.

-k


#3

I mostly use mineral spirits (also sold as “paint thinner”) for
removing pitch residue. If the article is small enough, I will put
it in a small jar with a lid, full of thinner, and suspend it in my
ultrasonic with a plastic strainer. This works very quickly. If
it’s a larger article, I have to resort to the old soak and
toothbrush method.

David L. Huffman