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"Gold plus" stainless brass


#1

Anyone heard of “gold plus”? A kind of stainless brass used by
jewelers in Thailand?

Hi all,

Maybe someone who knows about making jewelry in Thailand can help me
find out more about a kind of stainless brass called “gold plus” that
jewelers use in Bangkok to make models.

Apparently they began using this about 2 years ago.

I hope someone can help.

Thanks
Seb


#2

Hi Seb,

It depends on what your thinking of making from this stainless
brass.

Id say that its a correct definition when it “stains less” than
normal 70 30 bass.

here in the Uk one can buy a stain less brass which is with a spec
as follows.

From 5 to 11 % aluminium by weight, with the rest of the mass being
copper.

Its in fact called aluminium bronze.

Easiest way to try some is to go to a welding shop and ask for some
1/8in dia welding rod.

However you wont be able to silver solder it without the special
flux made by Johnson Matthey.

Really hard to work even when annealed.

Let us know a bit more what you want to achieve with it.

Ive used it a lot.

Ted


#3
Anyone heard of "Gold Plus"? 

Ran across an alloy being sold in Thailand under various trade names.
It was a very basic aluminium bronze with a composition of about 94%
Cu, 5% Al, 1% Si. It’s very drossy to cast and has a gold color that
resists tarnish. It does get a bit dull looking over time. It has
been called “V - Gold”, “China Gold” also. It will gunk up your
crucible & stirring rods with dross from the aluminum oxide, flux
won’t help.

Regards,

Jim Sivertsen
United Precious Metal Refining


#4

Hi Sebastien and other ‘master’ makers.

It would be interesting if there was a new master making material.

However, due to the human eye and it’s reaction to light and colour
there is still a superior material for the final master.

Red resin.

Make your master from whatever suits the purpose to achieve the
preliminary shape. Think out side the square, I have cut up and
glued some really interesting pieces using plastics and plastic toys.
Remember you are making a rough piece that will be cleaned up when
cast in resin.

Cast an RTV silicon mould from it.

Cast red resin into the mould.

NOW YOU SEE ALL IMPERFECTIONS, IT IS THE RED. Being resin it can
finished to incredible detail and highly polished.

Now make an RTV silicon mould from the final master. Cast wax into
the mould and you are ready to sprue on the tree.

If you do not believe me take the time to mould off a polished metal
master and compare the red resin to the master moulded from. You
will be in for a surprise, red highlights the slightest mark/
imperfection.

If you wish to do production runs, make a pancake mould and
Frankenstein a record player for the centrifuge. A hot mould will
allow the wax to cool slowly and the centrifuge action makes for
few if any air bubbles.

SO THE POINT IS THAT THE HUMAN EYE CAN SEE IMPERFECTIONS MOST CLEARLY
WHEN THE MATERIAL IS RED. THE BETTER THE FINISH ON THE MASTER THE
BETTER THE MOULD.

The effect of red I discovered when comparing solid colour resin
pieces. The need for polishing was most evident on the red.

Richard