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Gold crimp beads


#1

I have been making some jewelry for a little while now, mostly
stringing beads and such. I have used mainly silver components until
recently when I started using gold. I am having trouble with the
crimp beads that you clamp closed to attach the stringing wire to
clasps. The wire comes out of the crimp. Is there anything extra you
can do to increase durability with the gold components other than
just clamping them closed with pliers?


#2

Hi:

Are you using crimp tubes or beads? I never have trouble with crimp
tubes, but the beads sometimes open up. Also, ss or gf work better
than plated components.

Rhona


#3

Tonni,

I’ve found that if you either loop the tail back through the crimp a
third time or (my fav) add a short piece of wire (to make a third
inside the crimp) before crimping. This adds just enough to make
crimps more secure, especially when using thinner cable wires. You
could even dip that third wire in some good glue for a little extra
piece of mind, although I haven’t really found that necessary.

Dawn in Texas…who is jazzed to have something positive to say :wink:


#4

Hi Tonni:

The problem of the crimp beads letting go could come from a few
sources. Are you using heavy enough crimp beads for your Beadalon (or
Softflex)? Are you using a crimping tool or flatnose pliers? The
crimping tool is a good investment and makes for neater and more
durable crimps. It comes with instructions from Rio Grande. Also, if
your beads are heavy and you are using size 15 or heavier stringing
material (Beadalon, Softflex etc), you can try crimping in 2 spots.
Bring the cord down thru a couple beads and crimp again while hiding
the crimp inside a bead (this is tricky and can be done with only
some beaded designs). However, some beaders crimp and make the crimp
bead part of the overall design. Rio Grande also sells "crimp covers"
which are shaped like beads and close around a crimp to cover it. I
have stopped using crimps because one let go while I was showing my
work to a potential gallery…that was bad. I hope this helps.

Kim Starbard
Cove Beads


#5

Tonni, are you using gold plated crimp beads? Have you tried gold
filled 2mm x 2mm tubes? They really are much better. If you do use a
tube-style crimp bead, you really should consider using a pair of
crimping pliers. They’re relatively inexpensive and do a great job.
It’s a two-step process: flatten once at station #1 (nearer the
handle), turn the bead 45 degrees and flatten again at station #2
(nearer the tip). Creates a very neat, tidy pillow that really
secures the wire tightly.

Betty


#6

Kim,

I have stopped using crimps because one let go while I was showing
my work to a potential gallery...that was bad. I hope this helps. 

If you don’t use crimps, what do you use?

Dian Deevey


#7

Hi Dian:

Lately my main product has been a beaded bracelet which closes with
a button. A new product is going to be on a neck wire so I haven’t
been doing a lot of necklaces. However, when I do, I close with a
bead tip (the little finding that looks like a clamshell that closes
around the knot ). I don’t like it though. i don’t think it looks as
nice as a crimp. It’s a real problem because I have been working on
something new and I will not be able to use a clamshell at all. I
think I may try getting a new set of crimping pliers. Mine don’t
really make the crimp into a little “c” on the first round and then
when I crimp in the second hole, it doesn’t come out in a little
tube. Do you use crimping pliers and, if so, are you able to get the
neat little tube that you’re supposed to?

Kim


#8
    If you don't use crimps, what do you use? 

Have you tried french wire to cover silk cord? (And then you knot it
to close) If you’re using any of the nylon coated steel wire I’m
not sure what else to use.

-amery


#9
Mine don't really make the crimp into a little "c" on the
first round and then when I crimp in the second hole, it doesn't
come out in a little tube. Do you use crimping pliers and, if so,
are you able to get the neat little tube that you're supposed to? 

I was having a problem with my crimpers until I redefined the inner
edge shaping with a file. The crimp would fold up just fine in the
first station, but when I turned it 45 degrees to make the final
squeeze, it just wouldn’t stay put. After I filed the groove out, it
stays beautifully, and my crimps turn out just fine. They actually
look more like little flat pillows than tubes, though. Make sure you
use gold filled and not gold plate crimps. I had a terrible time
with the gold plate ones. They failed miserably every time I used
them. I finally tossed them out and only buy gold fill now.

Betty


#10
If you don't use crimps, what do you use

Hi Dian,

I use crimp beads but I pass the tread from many beads by going
back. One bead before cutting the tread I make a little loop and I
touch a little crazy glue, I tighten the tread. Be careful not to
touch any soldered part of your clasp with the glue. I think it
spoils the solder.

I would like to put a nice word about Rio Grande here. I admire
their efficiency and speed of the people of this company.

Kind regards,
Oya Borahan


#11

Crimping pliers will give you the neat little “C”. Practice a few
times first, but it’s pretty easy. And, you can still use the french
wire (gold or silver) to cover the thread or nylon-coated steel.
Gives a little more of a finished look.

-amery


#12

I’ve been doing stringing and beadweaving for the past 3 years. From
much trial and error, I’ve discovered that you just should not use
crimps with thread. You run the risk of cutting the thread with the
crimping process. If you use thread, use either a bead tip or a
clamshell to secure the finding, and then run the thread back through
several beads, knotting a time or two along the way before snipping
the thread. A dot of glue at the snip helps encourage the thread to
stay hidden.

Betty