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Gemstone treatments


#1

How are you all, Coming from a relentless designer, 2 and 3D artist,
wax(amongst other things) carver, I think that when the major part of
the designs in a jewelry company are created with wire, twisted and
manipulated, soldered together with metal shot, with purchased cut
stones added, then of course all current industry methods will, of
course, also be used to sell these things, including everything from
sly advertising to INDUSTRY acceptable consumer price jacking This as
opposed to an artist who relies on creative talent, imagination,
lifelong searching for the very best material and knowledgeable
(industry knowledge), fair pricing.

I mean if money is your game and you accept mediocre
design,advertising and industry standards as your tools as opposed
to ideallic type, consumer friendly standards, that are born out of
beauty and the fairest pricing POSSIBLE to your situation, then there
will always be these volleys, on orchid.

soulwood
dp


#2
   I think that when the major part of the designs in a jewelry
company are created with wire, twisted and manipulated, soldered
together with metal shot, with purchased cut stones added, 

Ok, so let me get this straight. Almost all of the major jewelry
designers of the 50’s and 60’s and people like Earl Pardon, Wendy
Ramshaw, and easily half of the AGTA spectrum award winners since the
design contest was started aren’t really creative, talented people
because they manipulate the metal they work with, use shot in their
designs, and use purchased cut stones? Come on.

Daniel R. Spirer, GG
Spirer Somes Jewelers
1794 Massachusetts Ave
Cambridge, MA 02140
617-491-6000
@spirersomes
www.spirersomes.com


#3

Just read now some of the posts sent during the past week or so
regarding startup gem dealers and gem treatments. Would like to add
my couple of cents before the subjects goes away. Actually, I wanted
to send this post earlier, but this is my first post to Ganoksin
(been lurking for the past couple of years), and didn’t know how to
send until a friend explained how (actually was mailing to
"Ganoskin" - with the s and k in the wrong place!).

I must agree more towards Steve Green’s and Ed Cleveland’s views
regarding the separation of natural stones with treated/enhanced,
than I do with Gerry Galarneau’s (though I have seen Gerry’s posts
in various discussion groups over the past couple of years, and my
impression of him is someone who is straight-forward and honest in
his views). There are many attributes that determine the value of
any gemstone. Chief among those attributes is rarity. A natural
occurring gemstone of beautiful color and clarity is a great rarity
in nature and deserves the optimum price. Anyone working in top
quality gem materials will tell you that a gem material of high
quality, and being natural in origin, would earn a premium over a
similar stone that has been enhanced or treated. That’s why
Sotheby’s and Christie’s prefer auctioning fine untreated gems over
treated. Ms. Antoinette Matlins, one of America’s foremost experts
in stressed in her buying guides (for serious gemstone
buyers and investors) that when it comes to purchasing top quality
stones, only untreated stones should be considered.

But most of the problems lay within the $1 - $1000/carat retail
range (the so-called “commercial qualities”), I believe. On one
hand, Gary said (and correctly so):

The reason for this is that it becomes an arguement that no one
can prove.  GIA nor any gem lab I know of can prove if a gemstone
has been heated or radiated if there is no indicators of radiation
or heating in the stone. Heating or radiation treatments do not
leave indications in most As stated by EGL - We know
that gem treaters are making amethyst out of clear quartz, but we
can not prove it nor identify it.  We do know that from experience
this amethyst does not occur naturally in this quantity and
quality

Yet on the other hand, Gary said something like:

I do have a suggestion for all that have anything at all to do
with My suggestion is that we call natural any stone
that has not had anything added to the stone.  That means that
heating and radiating a stone still makes the stone natural.  Even
blue topaz would be a natural stone under this definition

Gary are you aware that natural occurring deep blue topaz is among
the rarest stone in the world? Far rarer than diamond. And it’s a
very beautiful stone too. But what merit does it have in the gem and
jewelry world now? As a person who loves gemstones just as much as
buying and selling them, it’s like seeing a loved one going to the
gallows. These two different sayings from the same dealer show how
puzzled the industry is. And it’s not Gary’s fault, because I am
just as puzzled.

Another one:

I also do not put a premium on the stone being natural.  There is
no difference in my pricing between stones that are treated and
those which are not 

That’s only further salt in the wound for people who seriously wish
to buy a gemstone, but are scared as to whether they are getting
their money’s worth. When it comes to the Olympic games, and all
sporting events for that matter, athletes are expected to be “clean”
(that is, natural in body and ability, and not enhanced by drugs or
steroids in any way), and athletes breaking this rule have been
banned for life. Yet, when it comes to there are no
differences between a stone that was mined in its natural form from
that which was enhanced in a nuclear or scientific lab.

It’s interesting to note that there are plenty of irradiated fancy
diamonds in the market - pinks, greens, oranges, yellows, etc - yet
these sell far below the prices of “real” fancy diamonds. Why?

In my humble opinion, the truth about the buying and selling of
gemstones is all about greed. Almost everyone in this field - from
the miner sitting in the darkest corner in Africa, Brazil or
Afghanistan - to the suave talking gem dealer sitting in plush
office on 5th Avenue or Rodeo Drive, wants to buy a gemstone for as
cheap as possible and sell for as high as possible. Having been in
this field for six years, that’s my observation of things.
Treatments and enhancements only make it better. It’s like turbo
charging your old Huffy bike into a Ducatti motorcycle. Pure profit,
and the major players who get it all together are laughing on their
way to the bank. With treated gems you are basically selling nothing
for everything. I started my mark in this field supplying Kunzite to
a top buyer. I was supplying him rough cubes SAWN 100% clean and
perfect shape for a $1 a gram (anyone who cuts Kunzite will tell you
that sawing the material is the hardest part, faceting is easy
provided you have delicate hands). The material was pale pink;
something that Afghanistan produces perhaps thousands of kilograms
every year. But after subjecting the material to radiation and
heat-treatment, it was selling for $10 a gram next day as soon as it
got out of the lab (even higher prices per gram for special
quality). I once saw a couple of treated pieces in Bangkok, and it
just blew me away. The color was a mind blowing green (it was never
intended to be that way, the guy was trying to get the classic deep
pinkish-red color after treatment, but the internal chemistry of
Afghan Kunzites were different from other sources), and was selling
for $20 a carat WHOLESALE cut in Bangkok. I have no idea what it was
selling for retail in Europe, the U.S. or Japan. Now we all know
about the various markups that go into a product, but where’s the
justification for marking up a stone purchased for $.20 a carat (in
perfect rough form) to a whopping $20 a carat cut and wholesale in
the world’s gemstone market base? The sad thing about this was that
naturally occurring Kunzite, which in it’s finest and deepest color
qualities (both the red and the intense green varieties) is among
the rarest and most beautiful gemstone in the world, was being
totally overshadowed by this treated variety. Afghanistan is the
world’s most prolific Kunzite producer, and out the thousands of
kilos produced, perhaps only a tiny fraction is of true gem quality.
The way the rejects of this mineral were being made into
"Terminators" to kill their siblings for almost nothing in a lab was
shocking to say the least, and most worrying.

Dyed, diffused, impregnated, etc stones all will be called
"treated".  Doing this will eliminate the current deception of
pricing based upon whether the stone is natural or treated by
radiating or heating.  Cutting will be put on the same level  as
heating or radiating. They will become necessary processes to
produce a marketable stone.  That's my suggestion  

My friend, cutting is cutting. Treating something that was born
light pink into something deep emerald-green is quite another.

I ask Steve Green  - How do you know for sure your stones have not
been heated or radiated?

I can’t speak for Steve, but with me, I only buy rough, and the
rough can tell a lot whether or not the material was fooled around
with. Working at the mines helps a lot too. In fact, it helps a
tremendous amount. However, when it comes to cut goods, at times I
have this little feeling in knowing whether or not a stone has been
treated (not to say that I am right or wrong). It’s kind of hard to
explain, but generally, in my opinion, natural stones have a softer
and more delicate color (that doesn’t mean loss of color or a weak
color, it could be just as vivid and powerful as anything). Natural
stones tend to have more inclusions as well (and again, this doesn’t
have to be a detriment to the overall quality and beauty of the
stone - the world doesn’t look at a ring stone with a huge 10x).
Stones that have been treated and enhanced have this slightly
"artificial" or “synthetic” quality to them. The color is too vivid,
too uniform, and the clarity just as perfect. Yet the stone is cold
and lifeless - it lacks the “jazz” that most natural stones possess.
Natural occurring stones breath “life” that is hard to explain in
words. In the case of pleochroism, treated stones tend to have very
little pleochroism as compared to natural stones (though this may
not be true in all materials, such as Tanzanite, which is frequently
heated). Again, the color seems too uniform, too perfect. Being a
Kunzite specialist I can easily tell from Kunzite that is natural
from material that is treated simply by observing the pleochroism of
the stone. A natural Kunzite usually has intense pleochroism all
over the crystal or cut stone. The heat-treated stones show a much
more subdued pleochroism, almost as if it were amethyst. Same thing
for natural and heated tourmaline. Again, I could be wrong in this,
but that is my view and feeling.

Long time gem dealers like myself will tell you that only in the
last 10-15 years has the availability of brightly colored
gemstones been so abundant  

That may be true for African and Brazilian stones. Shucks, you
should have seen what was coming out of Afghanistan 15-20 years ago.
I have seen a couple of old roughs and pictures from that time
period and was very impressed. Any old timer working in Afghan and
Pakistan stones would tell you that the material coming out today is
nothing in terms of size and quality than what being found 15-20
years. Only the good Lord knows what those old stones are selling as
today and for what price…

Sadly, unless something honest and effective would be done, Ron
Mills’ view about gemstones of the future would probably be reality:

My take is that ultimately natural gemstones will overwehelmed by
phonies and that the market will implode. The public will be
brainwashed into accepting such phonies as Moissanite and,
ultimately, the jewelry business will be awash with so much crap
that the public will wind up settling for costume grade goods". 

In fact, I think the process has already started :frowning:

Sincerely,
Nasim Ahmad
Nasim GEM

“Your American source for top quality gems and precious stones from
Afghanistan and Pakistan”

P.s. Someone asked: “If a tree falls in the forest and no one is
there to see it, will make a noise?” I would say that the answer to
that is “Yes”. You just weren’t around to hear it!


#4

Mr. Ahmad, I cut my cutting teeth on tourmaline from Afghanistan in
1978. My personal favorites were the old blue greens and pinks. In
the late 1970’s I also cut some beautiful blue green aquamarine from
Afghanistan. Yes, they are all sold and I have not been able to
replace them with new stock.

I also have cut tourmaline from Pala, California, Newry, Maine,
Brazil, and Africa. Over the years I have bought many kilos of rough
garnets, spodumene, kunzite, quartz, beryl, tourmaline, and almost
anything available. In the 1970’s and 1980’s the stones I bought in
the rough had a considerable different look than the stones I am
offered for sale now in the rough. In the last five years I have
lost the confidence in my own ability to tell the difference between
natural and treated rough in the better qualities. Lower quality
rough is usually easy to tell and most dealers in rough do not even
bother to carry the lower quality. Higher quality rough looks
nothing like it did 10 years ago. Yet, all the rough I see offered
is sold as natural. The logic is that the miners are such
unintelligent and backwards people that they do not know anything
more than how to dig the rough out of the ground. I disagree with
the logic and think it is nothing more than false.

The USA is the one largest buyer of finished gemstones in the World.
That is fact. In the USA we are seeing a constant flood of
gemstones that have passed through 5 to 10 or maybe more different
hands before they reach the final buyer. What happens to the stones
from one hand to the next is lost in the transaction. In the USA
disclosure is now the law. How can you or anyone expect the final
seller of a piece of jewelry to know what has happened to the stone?
Confidence in gemstones has been so degraded that honest jewelry
stores are no longer selling stones as guaranteed natural without an
expensive gemstone identification from a qualified gem laboratory.

At the point where you have a laboratory report I agree that you can
with some degree of certainty sell a stone as natural. I would not
be totally certain.

By the way, a good cutter adds more to the gem than the rough is
worth. The most important steps in cutting are proper roughing out of
the crystal and orientation of the rough. Cutting makes the
difference between a ho hum gem and one which jumps. As many jewelry
store owners have told me - " You take ordinary stones and make them
look like much more expensive stones". That is why I do not price my
stone by the carat just as a custom jeweler does not sell their
custom gold by the gram. My work is more the work of an artist using
the tools and knowledge gained over 25 years of starting from
scratch.

My thoughts are simple based upon knowledge and observation.
Confidence in gemstones has been eroded. I would advise anyone
buying an expensive gemstone or who owns one now to get the stone
identified again using the current knowledge and technology. You may
be unpleasantly surprised.

Gerry Galarneau

Out of the ashes of the current lies about truth and
confidence may arise. That is my hope.


#5
Stones that have been treated and enhanced have this slightly
"artificial" or "synthetic" quality to them. The color is too
vivid, too uniform, and the clarity just as perfect. Yet the stone
is cold and lifeless - it lacks the "jazz" that most natural stones
possess. 

This is hogwash. I have seen thousands of treated sapphires that
have “jazz” and a whole lot more. I have also seen thousands of
natural stones that I wouldn’t pay 10 cents for, precisely because
they have no “jazz” or anything else for that matter.

Daniel R. Spirer, GG
Spirer Somes Jewelers


#6
This is hogwash.  I have seen thousands of treated sapphires that
have "jazz" and  a whole lot more.  I have also seen thousands of
natural stones that I wouldn't pay 10 cents for, precisely because
they have no "jazz" or anything else for that matter. 

I Totally agree with Daniel Spires Statement above… I grew up in
Thailand … 1964- 1980 ( go for vacations now) . Having a few
friends there who own large stone cutting operations gave me some
insight as to just how much " stone treatment" goes on.

The following statement relates to blue saphire, greensaphire and
ruby.

In the 1960’s there was no known treatments and all of the above
stones were considered genuine. By the 1970’s heat treating of
saphires and other stones was becoming a normal occurance and non
treated stones were becoming more difficult to find. The thai cutters
had also managed to make doublet ruby , saphire, yellow saphires
that are so well made it was not possible to determine if they were
genuine without some equipment.

I happen to have some of these that I have kept as many jewelers did
not believe this until I showed them a few.How they did it, I have
no Clue !

By the late 70’s mid 80’s my stone cutter friends were informing me
that 99+ % of all saphire and ruby cut in Thailand as well as in
other countries were all heat treated. In many cases, foreigners
would go directly to the mines to buy rough saphire … thinking
they were getting genuine untreated Thai saphire… I have to
laugh… Most of the rough saphire then, was being imported from
Australia by the people who owned the mines, then it was heat
treated as the australian saphire was almost black to a usable , good
blue color. One of my friends has 6oo cutters working for his
company and according to him, all of the rough stones he currently
buys from the mines is heat treated. So… so much for proper
disclosure !.

Again, these are simply my observations while I lived in Thailand,
Visited the mines, Bought treated materials at the mines etc…

At this point, I would never believe that a saphire was untreated
unless it was bought in the 1960’s to the late 70’s.

Happy rock hunting !
Daniel Grandi


#7

No. There are no intangible, “empathy” indicators (for lack of a
better word; it’s early in the morning here and the coffee’s not
kicked in yet) which will serve to distinguish a treated stone from
a natural.

To give two examples - Last year in Los Angeles, Charles Carmona, a
gemologist of international standing, told me the story of a gem
dealer who had gone into the jungles of Burma in quest of ruby rough
straight from the source. When he brought back the natural ruby
crystals he had acquired at such inconvenience, they turned out to
be laboratory made in Los Angeles. Moreover, said Carmona, this kind
of thing is not uncommon. It happens every day.

Still with rubies, The “Ramaura” lab grown rubies made by the J.O.
Crystal Company of Long Beach are to such a degree indistinguishable
from natural stones that the company adds a special chemical dopant
to the mix which gives the crystals a slightly orange fluorescence
by which they can be identified as lab grown. And even that is not
fail-safe.

You can pretty much assume all colored stone rough has been treated
in some way. The blue topaz that is so common these days results
from irradiation. Sapphires are heat treated as a matter of course.
Rubies are heat treated to enhance color and dissolve away the
included rutile needles which would otherwise make for a "sleepy"
stone. Most tanzanite comes out of the ground brown and becomes blue
only upon heat treatment. Aquamarine is heat treated to remove the
greenish cast which obscures the more desireable blue. Emeralds are
typically oiled or otherwise impregnated to enhance their clarity.

About the only place where the “too good to be true” indicator works
is with the cheap slices of dyed agate, whose unnatural candy colors
give the game away.

Cheers,
Hans Durstling
Moncton,
Canada


#8
In the 1970's and 1980's the stones I bought in the rough had a
considerable different look than the stones I am offered for sale
now in the rough. 
But that's hardly surprising.  How many gem mines do you know of

that have a lifespan of twenty or thirty years? Very few! In fact,
I can think of quite a few gem deposits that only lasted one or two
years. The stones that you buy now almost certainly come from
completely different mines from the stones you bought back then.
They will therefore inevitably have a different “look”.

honest jewelry stores are no longer selling stones as guaranteed
natural without an expensive gemstone identification from a
qualified gem laboratory. 
In my experience, that's simply untrue - as any visit to a large

jewellery store to buy coloured stones will show.

?8-)
-Michael.

#9
     honest jewelry stores are no longer selling stones as
guaranteed natural without an expensive gemstone identification
from a qualified gem laboratory. 

The question is then, will these stores give you a written guarantee
that the stone they are selling to you is “natural”? It is easy for a
sales person to tell a customer that, “sure, this is a natural,
untreated stone.” There is a huge lack of knowledge amongst the sales
staffs at most stores, big or small.

Joel Schwalb
@Joel_Schwalb
www.schwalbstudio.com


#10

I cut my hand a couple days back, so typing is a bit difficult now
with stiches, and I have to keep this short. Hats off to Lee Einer’s
post regarding the seperation of natural occurring gemstones from
treated/enhanced. I fully share his views, and pray and hope that
the industry would work hard in rectifying this issue (or in the
view of some folks, crisis).

Sincerely,
Nasim
Nasim GEM


#11

Michael & All, Let me explain what I mean by a whole different look
of rough. Rough stones in the 70’s and 80’s came to cutters with
pieces of other minerals attached. They were not cleaned to the
point that the only thing left was the gemstone rough. Inclusions of
other crystals was the norm. Almost all rough had silk or dusky
areas. Fractures and cracks almost always were easy to see because
they penetrated the surface of the rough stone.

The “look” of the finished gemstone had the natural features. In
the eyes of a person who has handled much of the natural rough these
features made the stones alive. Stones on the market today have
flash and color, but none of the character that put life into the
natural stones.

Rough from about 1985 has changed. I have numerous pieces of rough
from earlier times that I use as my “control” pieces to judge
against. Control objects are used in scientific experimentation to
have a known quality to judge a questionable object against. When I
first ran into the minor fractures is rough gemstones I thought they
were caused by the mining process. Dynamite and rough cobbing will
cause hair like fractures into the stone. The key is that these
fracture start on the outside of the stone and fracture into the
stone. These fractures I am now seeing are inside the stone and very
difficult to see until you start cutting. I have also observed these
same roughs as being much more fragile in the cutting process. Facet
edges chip quite easily. I started to wonder what was going on as the
common knowledge of the day was that only finished gemstones were
heat treated. After much talking to rough dealers I have found out
that it is easier and more profitable for them to clean the rough and
heat treat it in the rough than it is to sell natural rough.

I disagree with Steve Green about the heat treatment being done by
ignorant miners by a campfire with a coffee can and sand. All the
miners I know are very intelligent people who have the latest
technology available to heat treat the rough. They are treating
everything they mine that is worth selling. Be it quartz to
corundum. I do agree that heat treating should not be held in the
same bad light as treatments involving diffusion and radiation. But,
I disagree that heat treating should not be disclosed at the sale.
Customers think that natural means the stone has been cut and has had
no other modifications due to the hand of mankind. To not disclose
heat treating is being less than honest to the customer.

Now to the honesty question. How many sellers on this forum sell
colored stones and disclose heat treating? How many sellers on this
forum sell their stones as natural? Why do you not disclose heat
treating?

Gerry Galarneau Setting up a jewelry shop again. After 10 years away
it is a very apprehensive task. This time I plan to incorporate
lapidary into the process to arrive at a flowing process.


#12
How many sellers on this forum sell colored stones and disclose
heat treating? 

We have been doing this for 20 years. We disclose all forms of
treatment in full. We also make it clear to the consumer that there
are new treatments entering the marketplace constantly and that it
is conceivable that something is treated in a way we don’t know about
it. Can’t say that we have ever lost a sale by disclosing
treatment. We can say that we know people trust us because we do
disclose.

Daniel R. Spirer, GG
Spirer Somes Jewelers
1794 Massachusetts Ave
Cambridge, MA 02140
617-491-6000
@spirersomes
www.spirersomes.com


#13

Michael & All, Let me explain what I mean by a whole different look
of rough. Rough stones in the 70’s and 80’s came to cutters with
pieces of other minerals attached. They were not cleaned to the
point that the only thing left was the gemstone rough. Inclusions of
other crystals was the norm. Almost all rough had silk or dusky
areas. Fractures and cracks almost always were easy to see because
they penetrated the surface of the rough stone.

The “look” of the finished gemstone had the natural features. In
the eyes of a person who has handled much of the natural rough these
features made the stones alive. Stones on the market today have
flash and color, but none of the character that put life into the
natural stones.

Rough from about 1985 has changed. I have numerous pieces of rough
from earlier times that I use as my “control” pieces to judge
against. Control objects are used in scientific experimentation to
have a known quality to judge a questionable object against. When I
first ran into the minor fractures is rough gemstones I thought they
were caused by the mining process. Dynamite and rough cobbing will
cause hair like fractures into the stone. The key is that these
fracture start on the outside of the stone and fracture into the
stone. These fractures I am now seeing are inside the stone and very
difficult to see until you start cutting. I have also observed these
same roughs as being much more fragile in the cutting process. Facet
edges chip quite easily. I started to wonder what was going on as the
common knowledge of the day was that only finished gemstones were
heat treated. After much talking to rough dealers I have found out
that it is easier and more profitable for them to clean the rough and
heat treat it in the rough than it is to sell natural rough.

I disagree with Steve Green about the heat treatment being done by
ignorant miners by a campfire with a coffee can and sand. All the
miners I know are very intelligent people who have the latest
technology available to heat treat the rough. They are treating
everything they mine that is worth selling. Be it quartz to
corundum. I do agree that heat treating should not be held in the
same bad light as treatments involving diffusion and radiation. But,
I disagree that heat treating should not be disclosed at the sale.
Customers think that natural means the stone has been cut and has had
no other modifications due to the hand of mankind. To not disclose
heat treating is being less than honest to the customer.

Now to the honesty question. How many sellers on this forum sell
colored stones and disclose heat treating? How many sellers on this
forum sell their stones as natural? Why do you not disclose heat
treating?

Gerry Galarneau Setting up a jewelry shop again. After 10 years away
it is a very apprehensive task. This time I plan to incorporate
lapidary into the process to arrive at a flowing process.


#14

Gerry,

If you wish to quote and discuss/argue what I actually wrote then
please do so. I welcome a good educating discussion. However, please
do not make up things then put my name on them as you did in a
recent post.

The following is a quote from your Orchid post:

I disagree with Steve Green about the heat treatment being done by
ignorant miners by a campfire with a coffee can and sand.

What I actually wrote was:

“IMO they are not the same as a treatment which can be done on a
campfire in a tin-can full of sand by man 300 years ago or today.”

My point was that modern technology (super high temps & irradiation)
are not used for some simple treatments and this deserves
consideration and distinction in my opinion.

And then you go on to say in the same paragraph addressing me: "I
disagree that heat treating should not be disclosed at the sale"
which implies that I think it should not be disclosed. I NEVER
SAID (or think) ANY SUCH THING !!!

And then in the same paragraph addressing me and my past post you go
on to talk about honesty and dishonesty, again making implications
to me and other gemstone dealers.

Gerry, let’s set the record straight.

  1. I feel all gem treatments should be disclosed. Please do not
    infer otherwise.

  2. You blatantly misquoted me. Adding the word “ignorant” changed
    the entire meaning of what I said.

  3. Then you bring into question my and ALL gem merchants honesty
    with your final words "Now to the honesty question. (snip) Why do you
    not disclose heat treating? " How do you know what I and ALL others
    do or don’t do? Stop generalizing!

In this case your actions and words do not serve to educate, clarify
or inform this forum, but only add to the confusion when you
misquote and make false inferences. Whether you believe it or not
there are many many many natural untreated gems out there. All is
not as dark as you tend to paint it.

I think after your last post, the honesty question (who is and who
isn’t honest) is very clear. I think you owe me and Orchid an
apology and a retraction for your less than honest inferences and
made up quotes attributed to me.

To the rest of the Orchid List: Sorry to air my gripes, but I feel
that after such a blatant misrepresentation of what I said in past
posts I had to set the record straight.

Despite the tone of this email I am having fun, and hopefully
helping others understand the gem treatment issues : )

sincerely, Steve Green / Rough and Ready Gems

Your source for fine natural and treated gemstone briolettes. More
naturals than treated too. (And I’ll tell you which are which.)
www.briolettes.com


#15

Mr. Green-

you state in your previous post,

Then you bring into question my and ALL gem merchants honesty with
your final words "Now to the honesty question. (snip) Why do you
not disclose heat treating? " How do you know what I and ALL
others do or don't do? Stop generalizing! 

For what it’s worth, although it would obviously be false or at
least unprovable to state that no gem merchant discloses heat
treating, it is conspicuously obvious to anyone who has so much as
visited mall jewelry stores that many gem merchants do not disclose
gem treatments. Gerry’s actual statement was

 Now to the honesty question. How many sellers on this forum sell
colored stones and disclose heat treating?  How many sellers on
this forum sell their stones as natural?  Why do you not disclose
heat treating? 

Gerry’s statement was pretty clearly directed at gemstone merchants
on this list, not solely and personally towards you. And his
questions are valid. Many gemstone dealers selling to the general
public do not disclose known treatments. For gemstone dealers who
disclose known treatments, but sell stones without known treatments
as “natural” rather than “no known treatment,” the question remains;

If a gemstone dealer sells stones as natural, in light of the
ubiquity of gemstone treatments, how does the dealer know that the
stones are natural, in the absence of certification from a graduate
gemologist? Is the dealer relying on the verbal assurance of the
party from whom he purchases? Is an affadavit secured from the
seller? If the dealer represents his stones as natural based solely
on a verbal assurance from the seller, does that indicate a degree
of naivete inconsistent with a professional in the trade, or is it
more likely that the dealer knows the claim is questionable but is
willing to capitalize on the probable misrepresentation made to him?

Lee Einer
Dos Manos Jewelry
http://www.dosmanosjewelry.com