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Fumes in the workshop


#1

The carbon monoxide alarm goes off from soldering in my home. What
do you suggest to eliminate this problem?

Thank you


#2
The carbon monoxide alarm goes off from soldering in my home. What
do you suggest to eliminate this problem? 

Exhaust vent / fan.


#3
The carbon monoxide alarm goes off from soldering in my home. What
do you suggest to eliminate this problem? 

You need to be shure your fully oxidising your torch gas.

This means if it just propane or butane your air supply to the torch
is not bunged up with crud.

If its propane and oxy, you need to make your flame more oxidising.

Be careful tho, as this will affect your metal if your not using the
right flux for the flame.


#4

Hey Linda,

You don’t want to mess around with CO. It’s odorless and colorless
and seriously dangerous. Are you experiencing headaches, nausea,
flu-like symptoms? If so, you really need to make some changes.
Venting to the outside is a good start, along with bringing in fresh
air.

Obviously there is incomplete combustion somewhere, and it may not
be just your torch. You don’t provide much in your
posting. We don’t even know in what part of the world you live. I
suggest going to the epa. govwebsite and search for carbon monoxide,
and learn more about conditions and possible sources that are in your
home.

I’m just sayin’…

Judy in Kansas, where it is another lovely day. Can’t believe this
is Aug. 1.


#5
"The carbon monoxide alarm goes off from soldering in my home.
What do you suggest to eliminate this problem?" 

Proper ventilation.


#6
The carbon monoxide alarm goes off from soldering in my home. What
do you suggest to eliminate this problem? 

Unplug it.

Paf Dvorak


#7
Unplug it. 

Not such a good idea.

you might just have a death on your advice.


#8

Please be very careful with a carbon monoxide leak. It is a silent
killer.


#9
The carbon monoxide alarm goes off from soldering in my home. What
do you suggest to eliminate this problem? 

You need to be shure your fully oxidising your torch gas.

This means if it just propane or butane your air supply to the torch
is not bunged up with crud.

If its propane and oxy, you need to make your flame more oxidising.

Be careful tho, as this will affect your metal if your not using the
right flux for the flame.

One other thing to consider, if you are soldering on a carbon block,
you scavenge all extra O2, and will produce CO. You will need to
provide plenty of free air to get plenty of required Oxygen.

Tom


#10
Please be very careful with a carbon monoxide leak. It is a silent
killer. 

Silent but deadly.


#11

So, whatever happened to having active ventilation?

Come on, folks, if you’re creating CO (carbon monoxide), then you
absolutely need to ventilate when soldering.

And when you’re soldering, there’s no IF. you are ALWAYS creating
CO, as soon as your torch flame hits the surface of your metal,
whether or not you are using a charcoal block on which to solder.
Charles, please jump in here, if you want to add your to
this.

Ventilate by drawing the fumes away from you (NOT PAST YOUR NOSE)
and the studio space using a good strong fan. An open window does
not do the trick.

Linda Kaye-Moses


#12

Hi

I have an extraction/exhaust fan over my soldering station sucks out
"dirty air" and draws clean air into the room.

A kitchen exhaust fan will do.

Richard