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Foredom advice needed


#1

I am planning to purchase a Foredom Flex Shaft, and would appreciate
advice as to which model is best. I have learned in other areas
that cheaper purchase price does not always equal cheaper long term
costs, and was not sure if I would be better off going on and buying
a more expensive system, or if a less expensive one would really do
as well.

I still have lots to learn, and would like something that I can grow
into, rather than buying something that I need to replace as my
skills grow. At the same time, I am not, nor do I plan to be, a
full time jeweler. I work part time, and plan to continue that. I
work in semi-precious stones primarily, and doubt I will ever do
much with really expensive stones - I just don’t see that as a
market I can reasonably expect to reach. So I’m not sure if the
top-of-the line systems might not be overkill for me.

All advice is greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
Beth in SC


#2

Attn. Beth You have two models to choose from CC light duty or S
heavy duty. You can get a complete set which may end up being
cheaper. The price difference between the two sets will be about
$40.00.

Both the sets use the same Flexshaft & Hand pieces. The difference
is in the amps & rpm on the Motor & Foot Pedals.

A Foredom CC motor with CFL foot pedal & # 30 hand piece could cost
you $165.00.

A Foredom S motor set with an electronic foot pedal & # 30 hand
piece will be $210.00

You should check with a local supply store & save on shipping.

Kenneth Singh
karat46@aol.com


#3

Speaking of Foredom, I was in Lowes Home Improvement store the other
day. They were selling the Foredom “S” kit. I did not get a price,
but perhaps that is a good place to start looking.

Silverfoot-
Jewelry Designer and Craftsman
Main Site = www.firescale.com


#4

The Foredom in my Lowe’s presents itself as a woodworking kit. Is
this actually the same thing? Because the salesman told me he had no
idea why they had it; that it was too pricey for Lowe’s customers;
and that he felt it would be marked down significantly pretty soon,
as it has been sitting there for several months (with me eyeing it
the whole time )! This is actually what prompted my original
query, as I have several Lowe’s gift cards and could use them toward
the purchase!

Beth in SC


#5

My favorite hardware/tool store carries Foredom and had the new
company catalogue. Wow! I sent for one and have enjoyed the time
learning about things I didn’t know they made. Price list is
included, so you can call them for tech info or order by phone or
mail.

If I were buying today, I would buy one that has a reverse on it and
the best foot that I could afford, certainly better than the sewing
machine foot that I got with mine.

I have most of the handpieces, but use the standard one that came
with it most of the time. I could have saved my money. The fat one is
easier for me to grasp for long periods of time. Also a big deal to
me is that handpiece key chuck allows me to use all shank sizes in it
without extra time/effort to change out chucks.

Happy hunting…
Frif


#6

Beth

The S kit with accessories for Jewelers could be had for $200 that
is with kit No. 20, a FCT foot pedal and #30 Handpiece.

You should check what they have in the wood workers kit. If you had
to buy the contents of the kit #20 seperately it is worth more than
$30.00.

I would advise you to do your homework.

Kenneth Singh
kenneth@ringtools.com


#7

Dude!

Apparently you enjoy having to take the bit in and out with a chuck
key, butI have spent many hours looking for that darn key and the
effort to change every bit as you proceed through the work becomes
an almost certain way to develop carpal tunnel, arthritic changes
and the time involved… Think again about your preference. having
two handpieces with different shank receptacles makes more sense
although I have a keyed handpiece as sometimes collets don’t fit.

Ringman


#8

Well with all due respect to those who use special handpieces, the
standard chuck and key (I believe is the #30 foredom hand piece)
should be your first handpiece. It is the most durable and versatile
and should at least always be available for use. You can hold
standard drill bits (all diff. diameters) and a large variety of burs
that do not have standard shanks. That means you save money. The
quick connects are very nice and also more comfortable for smaller
hands. The hammer piece is a wonderful tool too (foredom’s is not the
only brand) .

As far as promoting carpal tunnel… sorry but that’s a reach. (no
pun intended) We as jewelers do so much repetitive motion that
blaming carpal tunnel on your hand piece is like saying it’s cold
because it snowed. Get what works best, then buy the luxuries.

Mark


#9

With all due respect, you obviously do not have any hand pain YET.
Six months ago I bought the quick release handpiece and it has made a
world of difference for me. You don’t realize just how much of that
twisting motion you do in one days time. Eliminating some of that
stress in your hands and wrist is a very wise thing to do for
yourself.

LaVerne


#10

hey mark: Try setting several hundred thousand earrings and you will
understand what I mean, I am not saying that that is the only reason
for carpal tunnel, but repetitive motion will eventually result in
physical changes. To eliminate the culprits from the mass we are
faced with is to give yourself a break and try to make your work
easier. Not revolve around one fits all tool to save a buck and end
up in pain 30 years down the road! Ringman John


#11

Hi Ringman & LaVerne, The original question on this thread was from a
person looking for advice on buying their first foredom setup.

To clarify: I have three foredoms hanging from each of my benches
each with a different handpiece. ( std chuck, quick connect, & a
hammer piece) Does that mean that everyone should spend the money for
that setup? I don’t think so. Do I think the best way to start is
with the #30 chuck? Yes.

As far as carpal tunnel goes, I will also stick to what I said.
Engraving, bead setting, hammering, drawing wire, squeezing pliers,
changing saw blades, & the list goes on, will contribute to wrist
pain more than changing a bur in your handpiece. For me, I’m most
aware of my wrist after using a computer mouse for an extended time.

Lastly, I do not have carpal tunnel yet but sometimes feel a
tightness in my right wrist. Occupational hazard possibly or is it
that darn handpiece?

Mark


#12

Hi Ringman & LaVerne, The original question on this thread was from a
person looking for advice on buying their first foredom setup.

To clarify: I have three foredoms hanging from each of my benches
each with a different handpiece. ( std chuck, quick connect, & a
hammer piece) Does that mean that everyone should spend the money for
that setup? I don’t think so. Do I think the best way to start is
with the #30 chuck? Yes.

As far as carpal tunnel goes, I will also stick to what I said.
Engraving, bead setting, hammering, drawing wire, squeezing pliers,
changing saw blades, & the list goes on, will contribute to wrist
pain more than changing a bur in your handpiece. For me, I’m most
aware of my wrist after using a computer mouse for an extended time.

I do not have carpal tunnel yet but sometimes feel a tightness in my
right wrist. Occupational hazard possibly or is it that darn
handpiece?

Mark