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Flux and fluoride


#1

Hello Smithers,

Confused some on flux and fluorides and hoping for some
enlightenment. My new studio doesn’t have the greatest ventilation
at this point and so looking to get rid of fumes where I can (using
pickle cold, liver of sulfur cold and having good results)

I was at a workshop and the instructor said to get the Ottoflux
silver brazing paste flux from Ottofrei as it doesn’t contain
fluorides. As a dutiful student I ordered it and just got it in the
mail. On their catalog it says no fluoride but on their container on
the back it states: Precautions use adequate ventilation when
brazing. Contains fluorides. Then on the front of the container it
says contains no potassium bifluoride? Not having any chemistry
background I really don’t know if this is actually any safer. Any
input is greatly appreciated. If this is not any safer can someone
suggest a safe paste flux?

Peace,
Carole


#2

I think the Otto Flux is Superior 601 or something similar, if so
then it has no potassium bifluoride but it contains other fluoride
compounds potassium fluorohydroborate and potassium fluoborate. If
you don’t want any fluorides then you can buy Superior 650 or a
similar flux. They are basically just potassium tetraborate, which is
very similar to borax but it is the potassium salt not the sodium
salt so no yellow sodium flare when it is heated with the torch. You
will find it doesn’t work as well as the Otto Flux though.

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#3

Hello Carole,

I embraze the fact that you’re working save however, You’ll always
have fumes.

Rio grande, Stuller, Hoover and Strong, Fisher and many other
dealers are selling saver products compared with fluorides A mixture
of borax and water is -as far as I know- the savest solution.

I’m sure that other people in this forum have more knowledge about
the chemical explanation of borax or other fluxes. Be aware that the
use of 2,4 gramms borax per kilo weight can be deadly for humans. The
poisinous of a chemical is not the chemical itself but the quantity
of it.

Have fun and enjoy
Pedro


#4

i use Handy Flux

John


#5
I'm sure that other people in this forum have more knowledge about
the chemical explanation of borax or other fluxes. Be aware that
the use of 2,4 gramms borax per kilo weight can be deadly for
humans. The poisinous of a chemical is not the chemical itself but
the quantity of it. 

Deadly ?- that is if someone ingests it…I’m presuming most
jewellers, and even novices aren’t affine to drinking ANY chemical or
compound in the studio…At least i hope you all have at least that
much sense ! However, if you are craving a shot glass of apple green
flux, i recommend your getting a new hobby or considering another
business… Have some sense people, nothing in the studio is intended
for ingestion! Whilst the argument for ingesting activated charcoal
(as a detoxificant ) may arise - though completely off topic, -
again, we aren’t here to discuss alternative health notions per se,
but jewelry making ! So better to take the powdered charcoal mix it
with beeswax and a bit of just out the trap cotton lint and make a
nicely shaped pick up ( a cone or stem shape works fine though
working it with warm hands for a couple of minutes makes it able to
take most any shape you need ) to help position and set gemstones and
cabs… bottom line chemicals in the studio are safe when used
properly and with adequate ventilation. there are many ways to remove
fumes from the bench or soldering areas-( from used chicken brooder
hoods, range hoods, to simply cutting a hole and from under the
bench, inserting hosing connected to a shop- vac and turning it on
when needed - to professional air cleaning systems for larger
studios, to small solar and/or battery operated “pet air
conditioners” that stand alone or are intended to hang on a n opened
car window- they work amazingly well to redirect soldering fumes away
from the jeweller’s respiratory system… ) point is to use safety
precautions in anything involving chemicals : and as uncomplicated
and space saving a system as possible for the size and scope of what
one does in his/her studio… rer.


#6

i use Handy Flux

I do too but it does contain potassium fluoride.

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#7
Deadly ?- that is if someone ingests it..I'm presuming most
jewellers, and even novices aren't affine to drinking ANY chemical
or compound in the studio..At least i hope you all have at least
that much sense ! 

Yes,deadly. That is the I’ve got from internet Like I
wrote -in the same article-,the chemical is not the cause but more
the quantity you use.

Borax is/was used in the foodindustry placed onder E-number E-285. So
yes, people eat it.

About having sence. I can recall a case where someone placed a baby
in the microwave to warm it up after a bath.

She didn’t knew that this was harmfull, the manufacturer had to pay
big money and had to change the labeling of their product. Thatmuch
for covering the expression “common sence”.

Lots of people start with making jewelry without knowing about the
chemicals used in tthe manufacturing of it. I admit that I made the
same mistake. I saw a book named “Jeweller, be aware”. That completly
changed my aditude.

Yes Mr Rourke, you’re 100 percent correct with the expression “have
some sense people”. For the ones which do not have thatmuch sense, the
word “deadly” may cause activating their brain to become aware of
what chemicals can do to you even with the use of borax.

Ganoksin is a worldwide common channel for jewelry The
we write will be used on this scale. I’m aware of that
and to keep Ganoksin as a very reliable knowledgeable source of
I like to be as complete as possible to my knowledge.
Better save then sorry.

Have fun and enjoy… but be aware.
Pedro


#8

The baby in the microwave is an urban legend, as is the poddle in
the microwave, the baby in the oven, etc.
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1xc

Elliot
Elliot Nesterman