Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Floor chicken wire


#1
When I ran contractor's shop, the floor was linoleum covered with
chicken wire. 

Leonid, what was the chicken wire for? - Lorraine


#2
Leonid, what was the chicken wire for? - Lorraine 

A lot of gold sticks to hands, especially if hands oily or sweaty.

This drops on the floor and gets carried away on shoe soles.

When floor covered with chicken wire, shoes never make contact with
it. So it is preserved to be vacuumed at the end of the day.

Leonid Surpin
Studioarete.com


#3
When I ran contractor's shop, the floor was linoleum covered with
chicken wire. 

The wire mesh allows any filings that escape the sweeps tray to fall
through so that they don’t become impressed into the soles of your
shoes and carried out of the shop.

I think Leonid may not have actual chicken wire in mind but
something more like the steel mesh called hardware cloth.

In Europe, so I’ve been told, many shop floors are covered with
steel grid panels so sweeps fall through and dropped stones don’t go
skittering around. The panels fit between screwed down rails so are
easy to lift up, rather like a reverse dropped ceiling.

Elliot Nesterman


#4

Yes, Leonid, what WAS the chicken wire for. Lorraine is not the only
one whose curiosity was perked by those words.

Barbara


#5
I think Leonid may not have actual chicken wire in mind but
something more like the steel mesh called hardware cloth. 

Yes, it is hardware cloth. Some call it chicken wire because it is
used to make cages for chickens.

Leonid Surpin
Studioarete.com


#6
so sweeps fall through and dropped stones don't go skittering
around. 

You can also buy various floors from industrial suppliers that are
rubber with a grid of holes. The rubber is easy on the feet and the
grid means that any dropped things stay where they fall. Another
option I’ve heard of is cork - things just stop dead when they land.


#7
You can also buy various floors from industrial suppliers that are
rubber with a grid of holes. The rubber is easy on the feet and
the grid means that any dropped things stay where they fall.
Another option I've heard of is cork - things just stop dead when
they land. 

If your floor were made of a soft material you’d have to send the
whole floor to the refiner to be burnt; sweeps will get impressed
into it as you walk on it.

The advantage of the metal grid floor is that you can lift up the
panels and easily gather any sweeps that have fallen through, which,
not being trod upon, will not be impressed into the flooring
material.

Elliot Nesterman


#8

Leonid,

With chicken wire on the floor, didn’t it make it extremely
difficult to find teeny tiny parts dropped on the floor? I usually
put an ear on the floor, closing the opposite eye so anything (no
matter how small) that is on the floor stands out (sticks up) and is
immediately visible. I thought this was a common practice…

Janet in Jerusalem


#9
With chicken wire on the floor, didn't it make it extremely
difficult to find teeny tiny parts dropped on the floor? 

Actually it helps. Wire prevents bouncing of small diamonds and
parts all over. If you drop something, it will be in close vicinity
of where it happened. Flashlight usually reveals the location but if
not, than vacuuming with pantyhose over the tube catches the culprit.

Leonid Surpin
Studioarete.com


#10

When I drop a teeny tiny part on the floor, I’ve found its often
easier and more fruitful to just start making another part rather
than wasting hours searching.

I’ve gotten to the point that I don’t even look down anymore, and
just start anew. (And am more careful next go 'round!)

Paf Dvorak


#11

My apron catches 99 % of what I drop and makes for a convent place
to put tools I am using for a complicated setting job.