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Essential burrs


#1

Hi folks,

I’m just about to embark on some new stone setting techniques other
than the bezel settings that I always make and I’m awaiting delivery
of a Foredom Allset Master stone setting system so that I can cut
accurate seats and channels, etc.

I’d like to know what sorts of burrs you think are essentials for
stone setting. I already have a set of good quality burrs where the
profile of the cutting surfaces is in the shape of a round brilliant
diamond’s profile - I can’t remember what they’re called. I also have
a set of similar ones where the sides are straight/vertical and the
lower edges are like the pavilion of a round brilliant - again I
can’t remember what they’re called. What other types of burrs do
stone setting folks routinely use and for what purpose? Do I need
the cup burrs to dress prongs for example?

Thanks in advance.

Helen Hill
UK
http://www.hillsgems.co.uk


#2

Sooner or later all burs become essential. Hart burs are used for
the seat area itself but what if you have a deep bellied stone? If
you keep cutting with the hart until you think the stone finally fits
you may have no metal left. Small wheel burs are good for relieving
for a pavilion. I use them by, oh jeez this may hard to describe but
here goes…Cut with the end of the wheel rather than the sides. For
example in a channel the shank of the bur will rest on the opposite
channel rail from the side you’re cutting(this is mostly for
squares). By using succeedingly smaller wheels you can carve up a
nicely shaped azure, uniform and bright. You can get tight into the
corners this way. If you used a bud or flame bur the finish would be
somewhat choppy.

A krause bur has its applications because it cuts down almost to
infinite small. Also good for following a carved line without so much
jumping out.

One thing to watch for particularly on hart burs is the coarseness of
the flutes. Too coarse a hart will just dig in too quickly, or else
catch on the piece and whip back out and score up your work. Better
off with sharp fine harts…more control. But they can burn up if
you go too fast.