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Entering shows with fees


#1

What do you guys think of shows with entry fees? Not craft shows/
fairs, but gallery shows at for-profit galleries that charge an
entry fee?

I just added up all the shows I’d like to enter and it’s $150.00.
Seems a bit much.

What say you, Orchidians?

Elaine
CreativeTextureTools.com


#2

I have always felt that entree fees are a way for the gallery to
pass along costs to the artist instead of taking on the
responsibility of covering the cost by actually having to sell
product. Entree fees cover costs and increase profit for the gallery,
taking a percentage of sales does not seem to be enough. The gallery
wants to make money from artists that are not even included in the
show and therefore have no opportunity to recover the cost of the
entry fee. Seems kind of one sided to me. I feel the gallery should
cover all costs of the show from the percentages that they receive
from sales. No sales no money, a bit more incentive. The gallery is
after all receiving the lions share of the promotion from any show
and by charging an entree fee they have indirectly increased the
percentage they take on sales… What I say.

Frank Goss


#3

Depends… shows cost money to put on - if properly done, there are
significant advertising expenses, extra staff expenses, opening night
expenses, etc. On the one hand, it seems like this should just be
overhead the gallery covers, and not charged to artists; on the other
hand, perhaps it makes sense to charge the extra show fees directly
to the artists who might benefit from the expenses…

I guess it would depend on whether you feel the fees are an effort to
gouge artists, or a genuine effort in tough economic times to create
a good sales opportunity for artists.

Beth Wicker
bethwicker.com


#4
From an organizer's perspective it is really expensive to host a
show, and am more than happy to pay a call for entry fee in stead
of an entrance fee to see the show. 

Here are some costs to consider, juror fee and anything surrounding
that, call for entry/postcard printing and mailing, opening reception
additional help for gallery, food, drinks ect. and inevitably some
return shipping of work.

Just a few things to consider,

Christine
christinebossler.com


#5

A lot of it depends upon the purpose of the show and who gets what
from it. If the money is for prizes after expenses then that seems to
be a reason but if you are expected to just be part of what is in
reality a selling exhibition then you should question why you are
being asked to pay upfront. What does the gallery get out of it?
more questions and answers are needed to make an opinion on the
reasonableness or otherwise of the exact charges.

Nick Royall


#6

HI Elaine,

Are you talking about applying to compete to have your work
exhibited in specific gallery shows? Or just applying to galleries
generally?

Linda


#7
What do you guys think of shows with entry fees? Not craft shows/
fairs, but gallery shows at for-profit galleries that charge an
entry fee? I just added up all the shows I'd like to enter and
it's $150.00. Seems a bit much. 

Companies who provide you with a place to show and sell your art
have costs involved which include at least rent, insurance,
promotion, employees, perhaps some food and beverage costs. They
also are in business to make money. Investigate how long they have
done shows, who their target audience is, how many people attend
their events, and decide whether or not the investment is worth it
to you. $150 does not seem like a lot of money for a show. The
American Craft Association has a reputation of putting on some high
quality shows with a wide variety of art being exhibited. They have
a waiting list to get into their shows and their fees for the April
2012 show in St. Paul are $850 plus a fee of $30 to participate in
the jury process.

Galleries usually take a percentage of the sale of art work, often
ranging from 30 - 50 percent. This is part of the cost of doing
business as an artist. You can also sell your work through a website
or join with a few other artists to put on a show. You will need to
rent or find a place, promote and all of the other functions that go
into putting together a successful show. It comes down to a decision
to use a gallery or show venue to sell your work so you can continue
to make your art or you can put together a show yourself. If you
decide to participate in a show or gallery do your homework to make
sure that the venue, promoters are going to be able to get your work
in front of potential buyers.

Pat Gebes


#8

This is the main reason I believe in the society, np association,
cooperative type of organization to run a gallery. When the artisans
and artists have a stake in the place, they come up with more
reasonable ways to run a show. My 2 cents. Maybe 3 with inflation.


#9
gallery shows at for-profit galleries that charge an entry fee 

I’ve never heard of such a thing in California. Is that a phenomenon
in other parts of the country?

Allan


#10

If the entrance fee carries with it the chance that the potential
participant may be denied by a jury, then I don’t really think it is
fair. It makes people who cannot profit from the exhibit help pay for
it.

However, it does assure that the people who do pay the fee are
fairly certain that their work will be accepted. This automatically
culls out inferior work and reduces the time the jury has to evaluate
possible participants.

$150 entry fee does seem high to me - if there is an additional
participation fee coming after that - but not if it is the only fee
to participate.

Susan
Sun Country Gems LLC
suncountrygems.com


#11
However, it does assure that the people who do pay the fee are
fairly certain that their work will be accepted. This
automatically culls out inferior work and reduces the time the jury
has to evaluate possible participants. 

I’m afraid I don’t see your logic here. If paying the fee gets you a
spot, then it isn’t juried, it’s sold. That means the only work
culled out is the work of those who cannot afford to pay.

On the contrary, having to pay before you jury will tend to weed out
those whose work is less likely to get in.

Noel


#12

Noel,

I think you completely missed this poster’s point.

However, it does assure that the people who do pay the fee are
fairly certain that their work will be accepted. This automatically
culls out inferior work and reduces the time the jury has to
evaluate possible participants.

I'm afraid I don't see your logic here. If paying the fee gets you
a spot, then it isn't juried, it's sold. That means the only work
culled out is the work of those who cannot afford to pay. 
On the contrary, having to pay before you jury will tend to weed
out those whose work is less likely to get in. 

His point was that those who might apply say to themselves, “Well, my
work really isn’t all that good, so my work probably won’t be
accepted. I don’t think I’ll enter because that would just be
throwing my money away.”


#13

I will not put work in a show that charges fees to jury! I agree
with Noel all fees do is cull out the people who can’t afford to or
won’t pay to be in a show.

It’s right along the lines of craft sales that claim to be juried
but take the first 20 potters that meet their criteria… even if the
next 20 potters that apply are better!

Lynne


#14

The juried shows that I know about are ones where there is a jury
fee ranging from $15 - 30. The actual show fee isn’t usually due
until the show sends an acceptance. I could be wrong but I think a
truly juried show should ensure a better balance among the various
crafts. With good balance the probability having a successful show
improves because there shouldn’t be a disproportionate number of
jewelers relative to other crafts. Show promoters have a vested
interest in having happy exhibiters who will find value in applying
for their shows in future seasons.

Pat Gebes