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Enameling questions


#1

I have an order for a pair of red earrings - true red that is. I
thought it would be fun to try enamel, however when I did a search
for red enamel I can’t find any. I’m told that it has to have lead
in it to be a true red and so Thompson’s isn’t making it anymore.
Does anyone have a source? I will need it within the next two
weeks. The other thing I wondered, would it be possible to make my
own using glass scraps from stained glass or the glass rods used in
bead making? I don’t want to go to the expense of using the Cernit
kit or other epoxies for one project, plus I really would like to
try the enamel. thanks, Jan


#2

I think this depends on two things.

  1. what is meant by true red. ( Thompson’s has both opaque and
    translucent reds - how true you think they are is another question.
    You might look at their URL : www.thompsonenalmel.com. If you use
    transparent enamel, you need to use gold foil beneath it. ), and

  2. where you live (. You can get lead based enamels, from either the
    Enamel Emporium 713 984 0552 in Houston, TX. Or EnamelWorks 206 525
    9271 in Seattle. They both import Ninomyo (sp?) enamels. Again if
    transparent, you need foil.)

Opaque enamels are bright and show well. Transparent enamels use the
detail in the metal to add depth. With foil, it is spectacular. Red,
unfortunately, is one of the harder colors to work with since it
will burn out but it sure is “purty”


#3
    I have an order for a pair of red earrings - true red that is.
 I thought it would be fun to try enamel, however when I did a
search for red enamel I can't find any.  I'm told that it has to
have lead in it to be a true red and so Thompson's isn't making it
anymore. Does anyone have a source? 

Jan: I am sure you will get a lot of replies to your question of red
enamel. Actually, I can’t wait to see what the others have to say on
this topic! I use Ninomiya Leaded Enamels which can be purchased by
Coral Shaffer at Enamelwork Supply Co., 1022 NE 68th St., Seattle, WA
98115. 1-206-525-9271. She is very informative and may be able to
help you out with your red enamel questions.Whether or not she
carries the red you are looking for I am not sure. You have picked
one of the most difficult colors to start your enameling adventure.
Are you enameling on sterling, gold or fine silver? Do you want an
opaque, translucent or transparent enamel? Ninomiya does have some
beautiful reds…but know that most reds have a tenancy to burn
out…which means the enamel can get black specs in it and actually
start looking like burnt toast. Some reds are more user friendly than
others depending on what metal you are enameling on. Some of the
opaque Ninomiya reds need an undercoat on copper or silver. (Coral
will be able to explain this to you) I am sure some of the other
enamelists who are more experience with a variety of reds from
different enameling manufacturers will be able to share their
experience. If you have more questions you can email me off the forum
and I can give you more Take care. Linda Crawford Linda
Crawford Designs Willits, CA http://www.lindacrawforddesigns.com

“If you don’t know where you are going, then it doesn’t matter which
road you take, does it?” Cheshire Cat in Alice in the Wonderland


#4

I bought a red enamel to use with Precious Metal Clay. Once it was
fired though, the color was pretty much grey. The blue and the green
worked fine, but not the red. I would test fire some of the red
before enameling the final piece to make sure it will come out red.

Cathy


#5
  I'm told that it has to have lead in it to be a true red and so
Thompson's isn't making >it anymore.  Does anyone have a source?
Enamelwork Supply Co. 1022 N.E. 68th Seattle WA 98115 1-206-525-9271 

If you’re working on silver, most reds, yellow and some purples have
a reaction to the silver and change color, usually not to something
you want. So be specific when you call. Good Luck Koranna


#6
I bought a red enamel to use with Precious Metal Clay. Once it was
fired though, the color was pretty much grey. The blue and the green
worked fine, but not the red. I would test fire some of the red
before enameling the final piece to make sure it will come out red.

Cathy, the red needed to be separated from the PMC by a clear flux
layer to prevent reaction with the silver. Enamel manufacturers all
provide specific instructions for using their products. Your enamel
supplier should have that

Allan Heywood


#7
If you use transparent enamel, you need to use gold foil beneath
it. 

Gold foil is not needed on fine silver with transparent enamel if
you use a good coat of flux underneath. (such as Bovano’s
Cristallerie #3 for silver or N1 Ninomiya-- all leaded) Another thing
to remember is to not fire high (not over 1450’) or for too long or
the transparent reds will turn a yellowish brown. Underfiring is
always a good idea until the very last firing— even then be
careful. Opaque red (leaded) like 175 flame is good for a true red
(if you can find someone that still has it)


#8
I think this depends on two things.
1) what is meant by true red. ( Thompson's has both opaque and
translucent reds - how true you think they are is another question.
You might look at their URL : www.thompsonenalmel.com.  If you use
transparent enamel, you need to use gold foil beneath it. ), and

Hello; A further question. Why does gold foil have to be used
underneath red transparent enamel?

Thanks
Eric V. Schmidt


#9

I just answered that 4 days ago but I guess some of you missed it. It
is not necessary to use gold foil under transparent reds if you use
enough flux so that none of the red enamel touches the silver. It is
necessary to fire low and do not overfire. Underfire each coat-don’t
use many coats or it will get dark. When overfired, tr. reds will
become and orange brown. Try orange peel until the last firing. Even
then be careful not to fire too long. Takes some practice to get
lovely reds and pinks. This our guild members learned when we invited
Faulker Fusager to give a workshop. Have a look at his lovely
cloisonne on www.itsmagick.com If you do use gold foil you get a
different look. Louise @lgillin1


#10

Hi Eric - It’s all to do with the base colour, a bit like
watercolour painting. If you start with a silver -ie: grey blue -
surface, a true red is virtually impossible to obtain as even though
the actual enamel is red it will appear pink, brown, sludge coloured
against that background. You need to start with a yellow base.
Assuming you are enamelling on silver, an alternative to gold foil
is a coat of flux underneath the red. The flux will give a yellowish
colour to the silver metal in the same way that gold does.

Incidently, a Japanese company - Kujaku - does make a leaded enamel
that gives a beautiful true ruby red straight on to silver. I don’t
know if it’s available in the USA but would highly recommend trying
it out.

Deborha Miller


#11

Greetings Orchidians. This latest thread on enameling has inspired
me with a new design. I’m a designer, 18K wax casting, some
fabrication. I know nothing about enameling and was never really
interested until you all inspired me these last few weeks. I have
just ordered a book on the subject, but haven’t read anything other
than the posts here. I have a nice, rather simple design in mind,
but before I start carving my wax, I’d like some advice from the
pros:

  1. Nearly all the posts referred to enamel on silver. I want to
    work in 18K. I’m thinking of a lime green enamel on green gold,
    and/or an orange enamel on an orangey gold (peach or rose perhaps,
    or dark yellow). Will this work?

  2. I assume that the deeper the transparent enamel, the darker the
    color…would that be a correct assumption, so those areas where I
    want a lighter color should be carved shallower?

  3. Should I be carving in some undercuts to secure the enamel, or
    is the bond between metal and enamel so strong that it isn’t
    necessary?

  4. I have learned here that stones should be set afterward, but how
    about assembling parts with solder? My stone settings, for
    example…should I do them in wax and cast it intact? How about
    other findings; bails for instance, which have to be soldered?
    Before or after? It sounds like the kiln temp is pretty close to
    solder melting temp.

  5. Lastly, after it’s done, is it possible to alter the surface of
    the enamel by carving or polishing?

Thank you in advance. It’s incredible, what I’ve learned from this
wonderful forum. I’m so inspired now, to take a new turn in my art
thanks to you!

Tess Headley