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Electrical cord for modern american kiln


#1

I have an old half-dome kiln by Modern American. It’s 110 volts with
a two prong power intake. I can’t find a cord. Does anyone know
where to get one?

Thanks
Georgia


#2
I have an old half-dome kiln by Modern American. It's 110 volts
with a two prong power intake. I can't find a cord. Does anyone
know where to get one? 

You mean an electrical cord?
If so, Homo Depot sells them.

If I were you, I’d get a grounded cord (three prongs) and attach the
ground with a self-tapping screw to the body of the kiln.

Paf Dvorak


#3

I found a thread about probably similar kilns at Cubi.org
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ep80rp One poster/responder mentions a
for the kilns.

I hope this is what you are looking for.

Ken Sparks


#4

Hi Georgia,:

I have an old half-dome kiln by Modern American. It's 110 volts
with a two prong power intake. I can't find a cord. Does anyone
know where to get one? 

If I were you, I’d cut a piece of the old cord off & take it to a
hardware store. Then ask the people at the store if they have a cord
of the same size.

If possible, get a replacement cord or an extension cord of the
correct wire size. If you get a, cord with the plug already on it,
great.

If you can’t get a cord with the plug already on it, get an
extension cord & then cut the end off it to connect it to the kiln.

Good luck!
Dave


#5
I can't find a cord. Does anyone know where to get one? 

Georgia, just go to the hardware store, buy an extension cord and
cut one end off and install it in the kiln. A cord is a cord.


#6

Hi Georgia,

I have an old half-dome kiln by Modern American. It's 110 volts
with a two prong power intake. I can't find a cord. Does anyone
know where to get one? 

Make it safe.

If your kiln two prong power intake will accept a standard extension
cord, DON’T do that. The molded plastic extension cord end is not
suitable for the high current and high temperature on your kiln. Many
110 volt kilns draw 15 amps of electrical current, overloading most
extension cords.

You can probably make the required cord from hardware store parts,
but it has to be the right stuff.

Probably should be 14 AWG wire size or larger (12 AWG is larger),
and the rubber sheath kind, not the vinyl plastic kind most extension
cords are made of.

You may find a nylon heavy duty cord end (not the cheap plastic
kind) that fits your kiln power intake. If not, then you may need to
connect your new power cord wires inside your kiln.

Your cord that you make should be the 3 wire kind with the green
wire attached to the metal cabinet.

Feel free to email me directly, if I can help.

John
The Jewelry Equipment Dr.


#7

Hi gang,

I think we’re missing something here: the OP mentioned that there
were two prongs.

If it’s what I think it is, he meant two prongs sticking out from
the side of the kiln. (It’s an old beehive, or tabletop kiln,
right?)

What it probably uses is one of those old detachable plugs for irons
or waffle irons. Those slid onto two pins that stuck out from the
powered item.

If that’s what it is, just take the kiln to a store that specializes
in repair parts for old appliances, and they can probably fix you up
easily, with a cord that’s the right wire size.

The reason I say this is that I’ve got an old Amaco trinket
(beehive) kiln that uses that same system, and just about all of the
older tabletop kilns I’ve ever seen use the same setup. It’s only
the more recent (1990+) ones that have them wired in.

FWIW,
Brian


#8

I think we’re missing something here: the OP mentioned that there
were two prongs.

If it’s what I think it is, he meant two prongs sticking out from
the side of the kiln. (It’s an old beehive, or tabletop kiln,
right?)

Could probably be simply fixed by calling in an experience
electrician to convert the two prong connection with a new cord that
then can be plugged into a normal wall socket.

MAK


#9

Hi Michael,

There’s nothing wrong with it. (The two pin system) and it does
plug into a normal socket. (If it’s what I think it is.) The two pins
are where the plug plugs into the kiln itself, not the wall. No
need for an electrician, just a new cord to fit the pins.

(Good news is that all of the pin sets I’ve seen for that system (at
least in the US) seem to use the same setup, so there shouldn’t be
much difficulty finding the ‘right’ cord set.)

They tend to be on older electrical heating gear, so you may not
have ever seen one.

Regards,
Brian


#10

If this is what I’m visualizing, these are the type of cord that were
used on things like waffle makers and table top skillets. The
replacement cords are stil. l made by companies like Woods
industries. Search for “Appliance replacement cord”. For something
like this you will want a minimum of a 12 gauge cable…

Ron Charlotte
Gainesville, FL


#11

Brian,

My thought was if you could not find a new cord that plugs into the
kiln, was to have an electrician come in and change out the two pin
plug on the kiln itself. If the plug on the kiln itself can be
opened the two wire leads can have a new cord spliced in with a plug
for the wall. Electrician recommended to determine the correct size
wire on the cord.

MAK


#12

The two prong cords burn up over time as they are so close to such
high heat. I’ve gone through many of them. So, hardwiring could be
rather a pain to replace.