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Efficient way


#1

We have begun to make inexpensive sterling rings out of wire
(patterned and otherwise). I would appreciate suggestions as to
the best way to solder these rings in the most efficient way. At
the present time I am individually soldering each ring using paste
solder and the “Little Torch”. This of course works beautifully
but is quite slow and not intellectually stimulating. Any
suggestions would be much appreciated.

Best
Barry


#2

You could make the rings from solder core wire and solder them
in a kiln- this is how chain is usually manufactured. Many large
refineries will make solder core wire to your specification.

Rick Hamilton
Richard D. Hamilton

Fabricated 14k, 18k, and platinum Jewelry
wax carving, modelmaking, jewelry photography

http://www.rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton


#3

Hi Barry,

 At the present time I am individually soldering each ring
using paste    solder and the "Little Torch". This of course
works beautifully    but is quite slow and not intellectually
stimulating. Any    suggestions would be much appreciated.

You might try putting a board(s) full of paste applied rings in
a kiln & bringing it up to soldering temp. You could also try an
Electro-melt furnace; it’d be a little more difficult to to load
though.

If you need to use a torch, you might try a propane torch. Ther
larger flame may save you some time. FWIW: The latest Micro Mark
catalog (800-225-1066) had what looked like a pencil sized
propane torch connecte d via a hose to a disposable propane
cylinder. There were several optional tips available also. It was
priced at $49.00 ( torch, hose & reg).

Dave


#4

why is it so slow to solder rings. it is production
work…but it can,t take more than a few sec. to hard solder
a piece like that. Boring yes but you are makeing a buck-- that
is why you are doing it. Marty


#5

I seem to remember that Rio Grande has a soldering board with a
special surface so you can line up a series of pieces and press
them into the board which will hold them in place. Then you can
simply solder one after the other , going right across the board
until they are all done. It probably saves some time, in that
you can do it like a mini-mass production thing instead of one at
a time. Hope this helps. Sandra


#6

Rick - What is Solder Core Wire ? Thanx - Laura


#7

I seem to remember that Rio Grande has a soldering board with a
special surface so you can line up a series of pieces and press
them into the board which will hold them in place. Then you can
simply solder one after the other , going right across the board
until they are all done. It probably saves some time, in that
you can do it like a mini-mass production thing instead of one at
a time. Hope this helps. Sandra

Setting a job up so that you are preheating your next piece as
do a solder will save time.


#8
I seem to remember that Rio Grande has a soldering board with
a special surface so you can line up a series of pieces and
press them into the board which will hold them in place.<<

Actually you can use any flat fire/heat proof surface. I
regularlly lay o ut several rows of sterling links for chain on a
regular firebrick, apply paste solder to the inside of the join,
turn the brick around so I’m looking at the join from the
outside, then go down each row with the torc h. Never time
myself, but I’d guess under 5 minutes for 100 links. Pick the
rings up on a copper wire after they’re soldered. When they’re
all pick u p, twist the ends of the wire together & put in the
pickle. Saves time tryin g to fish individual rings out of the
pickle.

Put the brick on a turntable (one from the Walmart housewares
dept, they’ re used to store plates on in your cupboard).

Dave


#9
  Pick the rings up on a copper wire after they're soldered.
When they're all pick u p, twist the ends of the wire together
& put in the pickle. Saves time tryin g to fish individual
rings out of the pickle.  

Dave, this is a great idea. What a time saver. Keep up the
great tips. And thanks.

Linda
@Red1Eagle