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Education and The Bottom Line


#1

Suzanne, you will have your hands full with this one. I haven’t
time just now, as the muse is with me for creating something
important, to go into the whole subject in depth. However, as it
takes off, I want to say that over the years I have become aware of a
great many artists, artisans and crafts people who got less than a
great formal education because they were any combination of learning
disabled, i.e., dyslectic, ADHD, for instance. However, they are
great with their hands and often quite talented creatively as well.
It seems to me that a lot of jewelers fall into that category and
are often the self taught, or slightly taught. My hope is that it
not become a subject where they will be made to feel inferior or
self-conscious. Therefore, let me be the first to say that a degree
or formal education has nothing to do with talent or a gift for
creating beautiful things, be it music or jewelry. A gifted person
would do well to choose a partner who can take care of the paperwork
and other details of business to smooth the way as they happily
create beauty whatever they do.

No Creative Blues Here.

Pat


#2

Learning disabled Artists and Artisans

 I have become aware of a great many artists, artisans and crafts
people who got less than a great formal education because they were
any combination of learning disabled, i.e., dyslectic, ADHD, for
instance.  However, they are great with their hands and often quite
talented creatively as well. 

In 1991 after a very bad accident, I returned to work when I could
walk again. Amnesia can be considered a form of learning disability .
When I could not remember what to do next, I would pick up the most
appropriate looking tools and let my mind clear as for meditation .
My hands seemed to remember what my head could not. And my mind
followed.

You will retain more than you remember. You will need faith and
patience to encourage hidden skills to come forth. Firmness and
gentleness together is required. Squalling wall eyed fits just
happen, just lay the moment aside and move on. You will learn to work
in new and unexpected ways. You will continue to grow. ROBB


#3

I was totally aghast when I discovered that I was a dyslexic, not
only till the age of 40 did I know what my own problems were. you
can’t imagine the shock!

I had to struggle through my formative years groping and trying to
learn my craft. Although it took me quite a tad longer, I have
excelled… and now am calling myself

“A Happy Dyslexic”, very happy! I taught myself to learn how to type
and to operate the PC, but am creative in writing and setting
diamonds…(humble here)…now I am a teacher of stone setting, many
of us have some form of learning disabilities we should never fall by
the way-side.

“We” have lots to offer the world…look at Einstein, Churchill &
Tom Cruise. So if anyone is moaning that they have a certain learning
problem, don’t wanna hear whining,

life is too short…after all…its ‘normal’ now to have a learning
problem…:>) its a G-d given gift, lets all use it to the
utmost…gerry!