Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Difficulty to cure ceramit properly


#1

Hello to All,

I’m new to the orchid site. Please forgive me if this question has
already been asked but I only find a couple of emails on the subject
that don’t directly answer my problem.

I just started using Ceramit and having a very difficult time
getting it cure properly. I’ve tried the kitchen oven and just
allowing it to air cure but to no avail. The enamel remains soft and
can not be polished. I know that it’s possible to buff it out since I
have apiece that I did about 6 months ago and it has hardened to the
point that it can be satisfactorily buffed. How do I get new pieces
to harden satisfactorily. I believe that I’m following the
instructions properly. One of the Orchid item stated that it is
difficult to find a Ceramit kit that was not out of date. How can I
tell if this is the case with my kit?

Thanks for any help you can offer.

Mike


#2

Hi Mike

I personally haven’t used the Ceramit… but I have read so many
dang books on nearly every jewelry technique and I remember reading
that the humidity can have an impact on how resins like Ceramit set
up. Do you remember if it was super humid on the days you’ve used it?
I see your email hails from Tampa Bay so I am guessing you are used
to dealing with some humidity :wink:

I don’t know what you could do to avoid using the Ceramit in
humidity other than trying it in winter when the air may be a bit
drier?

Laney


#3

The other thing that occurs is that you may have a problem with your
catalyst. Ceramit is a two-part resin with all the problems that
implies if you don’t get the proportions right, or the catalyst has
gone bad, etc.

RC


#4
I personally haven't used the Ceramit... but I have read so many
dang books on nearly every jewelry technique and I remember
reading that the humidity can have an impact on how resins like
Ceramit set up. 

I haven’t tried Ceramit, but if humidity is an issue buy a good
dehumidifier. I live in SC, and run an industrial unit constantly in
my studio to try and keep the humidity in a reasonable range. I got
mine at Grainger, an industrial supply chain. This might help, and
will certainly help your metal tools!

Beth in SC where it is actually NOT terribly humid today for a
change! It has been like soup around here all week.


#5
I got mine at Grainger, an industrial supply chain. This might help,
and will certainly help your metal tools! 

I think it’s just the opposite: humidity is needed for the cure of
resins. But probably not at the levels of SC.


#6

I’ve had the same problem. It got sorted out when I cooked it longer
and a little lower than the directions say. I thought Ceramit had
some interesting possibilities but finally the hassle made me drop
my plans.


#7

Reading through the literature, there’s another possible cause of
the problem with Ceramit. The hardener (catalyst) has a shelf life of
about a year. After that it gets less effective.

From the description of the problem, I suspect the catalyst has
gotten too old to give good, consistent results.

RC