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Design


#1

On the subject of design… What are the basic elements of a
"complete" design ? I’ve noticed that some pieces don’t look right
until another element is added such as- a border, another stone,
texture, doming… Other pieces are too busy and need to be
simplified. It can be very difficult for some people to design.
(like me) I think analytically first. I look at other people’s
work and try to see what they got right. Then of course there are
the one`s whose work defies the norm and still looks great.

Allyson
@iamorrison


#2
 On the subject of design... What are the basic elements of a
"complete" design ?  I've noticed that some pieces don't look
right until another element is added such as- a border, another
stone, texture, doming... Other pieces are too busy and need to
be simplified. It can be very difficult for some people to
design. (like me)  I think analytically first.  I look at other
people's work and try to see what they got right.  Then of course
there are the one`s whose work defies the norm and still looks
great. 

I find that “complete” design depens on Personal taste. Some LOVE
busy, some love simple. As long as they buy, does it really matter
what I (as the one who made it) think about the piece? Most of the
pieces I sell are the ones that I’m not thrilled with . . . guess,
my customers and I differ in “taste”


#3

Hello Ian, I’m new to jewelry, but I do have a lot of experience as
a traditional artist in other media. I don’t think there is a true
and tried formula for good design of whatever it may be the piece
you’re working on, however, you can try to get a better sense of
design by visiting museums or getting some books on traditional
fine arts and design. Especially books on composition, which deals
a lot with ‘balance’, visual perception (how we perceive a piece of
art and the visual tricks our eyes create). The more you refine
your taste by looking at all kinds of art forms, the easier it
will be for you to come up with your own designs. Also, you
mentioned: ‘there are some pieces that need to be simplified’…
that is probably your own judgment that is asking you to simplify
or to add to the piece. In the hands of a different artist, a piece
that seems too complex may seem just right. Society and trends also
play a major role in determining how complex or ornate a piece
should be: our century is very minimalist and tends to create art
that are bare and clean. Studying some art history also helps to
acquire a different sense in respect to that.

—Eni Oken
~3D Digital Artist~
http://www.oken3d.com


#4

Allyson, This is a VERY difficult question. It depends on the type
of design desired and very much on personal taste. After a while
you do develop a sense for what works and what doesn’t, but it’s
hard for me to disseminate that

    What are the basic elements of a "complete" design ?  

As you have noticed, intuitively, a complete design needs to be
balanced. This is fairly straight forward with symmetrical
geometric designs, but less clear with say a asymmetrical organic
design. Although it can be harder to pull off the clean geometric
design, as everything has to be perfect. If you are interested in
finding out more about how to create a balanced asymmetrical (not
necessarily organic) design I would recommend going to your local
library and looking into a school of design call the "Bauhaus"
which started in Germany in the early twentieth century and moved
to the U.S. around World War II. Most design since then is
influenced this movement.

    I look at other people's work and try to see what they got
right.  

That’s a good way to learn, borrow some elements from an existing
piece and incorporate them into your design. Once again you can
look to recent and ancient history for references. It helps to
know what has come before and learn from an others experience.

I hope this has been of some help,

Eddie
Ed Colbeth Metalsmith, UMASS Dartmouth
Taunton, Massachusetts (Soon to be Deer Isle, Maine)
508-823-9704

ICQ# 6247734


#5

Dear Eni, what a cogent summation on design. Thankyou. It reminds
me of what the English-born Australian art critic Giles Auty wrote
when he summed up his method of assessing art as “Head, Heart and
Hands”. Briefly paraphrasing, Auty used the analogy of the Head as
the intellectual stimulus, the Heart as the emotional, intuitive
element in creativity, and the Hands as representative of the skill
in executing the work.

“Head, Heart and Hands” is an approach I have since used with my
own students when exercising our critical faculties or when
assessing any work, be it jewellery or any other art-related item.
Regards, Rex from Oz