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Deoxidized sterling casting grain


#1

Has anyone else tried deoxidized sterling casting grain?

Kenneth Gastineau


#2

Has anyone else tried deoxidized sterling casting grain?

I don’t sell silver, but I use it for making master models. I used some of
that #57 from United Precious Metals on Saturday. Pretty clean. Virtually no
oxidation. A little more expensive. I think that it would make a difference
to those companies that are selling silver castings by the gram. Seems fine
for modeling.

http://www.knight-hub.com/manmtndense/bhh3.htm
e-mail: @Bruce_Holmgrain
snail mail: POB 7072, McLean, VA 22106-7972, U.S.A.


#3

Kenneth
I have and still use the De-ox Sterling from United Precious metals… the
metal itself is really great… I like it alot…
MarcFrom: owner-orchid@proteus.imagiware.com on behalf of Kenneth Gastineau
Sent: Monday, October 07, 1996 8:16 PM
To: orchid@ganoksin.com
Subject: Deoxidized sterling casting grain.

Has anyone else tried deoxidized sterling casting grain?

Kenneth Gastineau

procedures


#4

At 12:16 AM 10/8/96 +0000, you wrote:

Has anyone else tried deoxidized sterling casting grain?

Kenneth Gastineau

Kenneth, I have used United deox silver for 3 years now, it is WONDERFUL! My
castings come out totally clean (just don’t overheat the silver when you cast).

             Richard Laspada

#5

Richard wrote:

Kenneth, I have used United deox silver for 3 years now, it is WONDERFUL!
My
castings come out totally clean (just don’t overheat the silver when you
cast).

                 Richard Laspada

Richard:

How do you know if you are overheating the deoxed silver? Do you cast as
soon as it seems molten or do you let it soak up heat a little longer? What
problems have you experienced in the castings when it is overheated?

I have been using the #57 alloy for about a year now. I like it alot,
especially since there is absolutely no fire scale. However, I am still
fine tuning its use. I am melting in a propane fueled melting furnace.

I also got a small quantity of deox bronze from them. I haven’t tried it
yet, but I am looking forward to seeing how well it works. Kind of
expensive about $20.00 a pound (expensive for bronze anyway). I am planning
to use it for small detailed accents.

I’d appreciate any tips you might have. Thanks

Kenneth Gastineau
gastin@mis.net


#6

The BIG question, is HOW MUCH is the de-ox silver casting grain? How much
is just one ounce of this stuff? Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html


#7

Dave Stephens wrote:

The BIG question, is HOW MUCH is the de-ox silver casting grain? How much
is just one ounce of this stuff? Dave

Dave:

Here are the folks that have the patent on the deox sterling. Call and ask
what the current price is. I think my last shipment was close to seven
dollars an ounce.

United PMR
2781 Townline Road
Alden, NY 14004
800-533-6657

Angelo “Stick” Lorenzo is the salesman I work with.
I use their newest alloy #57, it costs more but casts bright.

For me the added cost is offset by savings in labor, no firescale to buff
off. I also have fewer rejects.

Kenneth Gastineau
gastin@mis.net


#8

Dave Stephens wrote:

The BIG question, is HOW MUCH is the de-ox silver casting grain? How much
is just one ounce of this stuff? Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html

orchid@ganoksin.com

about 8 bucks pr. oz.


#9

Oops, I forgot to mention that I use a Neycraft spin caster for my casts

                    Richard Laspada

#10

Richard wrote:

Kenneth, I have used United deox silver for 3 years now, it is WONDERFUL!
My
castings come out totally clean (just don’t overheat the silver when you
cast).
How do you know if you are overheating the deoxed silver? Do you cast as
soon as it seems molten or do you let it soak up heat a little longer? What
problems have you experienced in the castings when it is overheated?

I have been using the #57 alloy for about a year now. I like it alot,
especially since there is absolutely no fire scale. However, I am still
fine tuning its use. I am melting in a propane fueled melting furnace.

I also got a small quantity of deox bronze from them. I haven’t tried it
yet, but I am looking forward to seeing how well it works. Kind of
expensive about $20.00 a pound (expensive for bronze anyway). I am planning
to use it for small detailed accents.

I’d appreciate any tips you might have. Thanks

Kenneth Gastineau
gastin@mis.net

I overheated it once and the cast came out very dark and required excessive time
to polish. The answer to how hot: JUST hot enough for the cast it really
depends on what you’re casting and how much intricacy. Generally I cast when
the metal will stay molten for about 3 or 4 seconds after the flame is removed.

                   Richard Laspada

#11

Richard Laspada wrote:

Richard wrote:

Kenneth, I have used United deox silver for 3 years now, it is WONDERFUL!
My
castings come out totally clean (just don’t overheat the silver when you
cast).
How do you know if you are overheating the deoxed silver? Do you cast as
soon as it seems molten or do you let it soak up heat a little longer? What
problems have you experienced in the castings when it is overheated?

I have been using the #57 alloy for about a year now. I like it alot,
especially since there is absolutely no fire scale. However, I am still
fine tuning its use. I am melting in a propane fueled melting furnace.

I also got a small quantity of deox bronze from them. I haven’t tried it
yet, but I am looking forward to seeing how well it works. Kind of
expensive about $20.00 a pound (expensive for bronze anyway). I am planning
to use it for small detailed accents.

I’d appreciate any tips you might have. Thanks

Kenneth Gastineau
gastin@mis.net

I overheated it once and the cast came out very dark and required excessive time
to polish. The answer to how hot: JUST hot enough for the cast it really
depends on what you’re casting and how much intricacy. Generally I cast when
the metal will stay molten for about 3 or 4 seconds after the flame is removed.

                       Richard Laspada

orchid@ganoksin.com

Another thing to watch for when you are casting is in stirring the
metal.I use a carbon rod and stir to make sure there are no unmelted
lumps and then cast if it is melted then it is hot enough…Gavin