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Creating studio name, suggestions?


#1

-Can you suggest best way to come up with a name for an art studio.

Several names I had hoped to use are already taken when I searched
on goggle.

I would prefer not to use my name or the country I am living in but
where to go from here?

Do you pick something easy to remember?

Or connected with your style of jewelry?

Or how did you come up with your studio name?

Sharron


#2

The name of your first pet and the name of the street you lived on
as a kid.

Oh, wait, that’s something else.

There are any number of ways. Astrology, mythology, alchemy,
chemistry, metallurgy, literature, art history, nature… There are
influences everywhere.

My studio is Ajour Design. I trained in a French tradition shop, so
cutting mise–jour was something we did nearly every day. Ajour is
French for openwork and it reminds me of the tradition in which I
was trained.

Elliot Nesterman


#3

Hi Sharron, I have a friend who named hers after her cat. People
always assume it’s her name, it’s kind of funny. Years ago I called
mine Goldworks, I remember talking to someone at Hoover & Strong and
she said that there were two pages of shops with the same name on her
computer screen. That made me feel less than creative, I later
changed it. I’d suggest you just keep your eyes and ears open for a
name you like and the ‘Universe’ will send you one. I listen to
audiobooks all day and have a note pad on my bench where I write down
phrases, ideas or words that interest me or made me think. For me
it’s fun to look back at, for you it might lead to a name that you
like? I envy you for just starting out, that was such a long time ago
for me.

Mark


#4

Actually I am certainly not starting out. I am setting up a new
studio where I now live and also setting with a new name.

I name I used before is a Spanish name but now I live in a Spanish
speaking country everyone and his dog has that name.

Thus my search for a new studio name.

Thanks for the suggestions.
Sharron


#5

I love your name Ajour Design Elliot

I’m a bit late to this conversation, but I have been struggling to
come up with a name for my studio for the last couple of years. My
studio is about 300 feet from the Deschutes River here in Central
Oregon and on a warm summer’s day I can hear the river with the
windows open. Over the years of being a maker the metaphor of moving
water has taken on many shapes and contours in my work. water has
always been a positive, sometimes life giving reference in my life
and work.

I would love to somehow tie the idea of the river or moving water in
to the name, but everything I’ve come up with so far seems too
hokey.

Anyone care to visit me and help come up with a name? I’ll supply
the wine.

Happy Holidays everyone.

Jim
James Dailing


#6

My studio name came after I realized that my original choice was
also incredibly popular and I’d never stand out (it something
involving the word Dragonfly, as I, my friends and some family have a
’thing’ for them).

What I eventually came up with was much different, it was one of
those things that “just came to me” one day. It’s called MonkeyBird
Studio., and it’s a play off of something my brother and I used to
insult each other with - well, we’d actually torment my mother who
hated hearing us say it.

Don’t ask me why or how it came to me like that, I can’t even dream
a reason up.

I have a very personal attachment to it, hearkening back to days of
mischievous children at play, and even of family. For the outside
world, it’s just a cute name that’s different, I hope. I honestly
don’t know how people ‘take’ it; though that’s often an important
topic of research in naming a business I preferred to go with my gut.

There are a lot of tricks out there in google-land on coming up with
a general name, cute or professional sounding, even memorable. But it
comes down to what you’d like to see yourself called day in and day
out, have on business cards, etc, and also say, repeat, and write
out.

Good luck!
Cheers,
Becky

The insult was “monkey butt” for those curious.


#7

For me I wrote down several that I thought of and thought on them
for awhile. Since I generally consider my self a lapidary first and
within my family I’m call Chuck. It hit me one day that it should be
Chucks Rock Studio. People remember it and their first thought is a
rock music studio till they see my work.

I feel like it was kind of sent to me, or it hit me in the head and
it finally sunk in.

Charles


#8

Wanting a unique name that had some versatility as I was not sure
exactly where my smithing would take me, I use my husband’s first
name and a short version of my name: Edgin Creations. Logo includes
the anvil that I use for most everything. People seem to remember it
and my first name. Helps to be visible in town in community events
(not just selling, but helping).

Ginger Smietana


#9
I would love to somehow tie the idea of the river or moving water
in to the name, but everything I've come up with so far seems too
hokey. 

There’s actually an e acute at the end, Ajour-ay. But plain text
email drops out accented letters.

FWIW, “aquavitae” is water of life in Latin, whence the Scandinavian
liquor “akvavit,” the French “eau de vie,” the Polish “okowita,” and
others.

You might also look at the Japanese language. That culture has a
very deep and philosophical relationship with water.

Wikipedia tells me that the name of your river is from the French
"Riviere des Chutes," River of the Falls. You could go with a French
name “Atelier des Chutes.” Just some quick notions.

Elliot Nesterman


#10

Hello James

Keep it short and early in the alphabet. The river is good or
perhaps inspiration from your favorite technique like fire or
hammering or casting. If you can use your last name even better. You
want people to be able to find you. These come to mind: JD or Dailing
Metalist. Gems by JD. Hammer Master.

Let us know what you come up with.
Judy in Kansas, who hopes everyone has a wonderful holiday


#11

a river going by can be going in a number of ways - flowing,
tumbling, babbling, streaming. if it is in rapids or at the base of a
falls in french it is said to be boiling — chaurdiere. Again the
accent is missing so I will add the Canadian Multilanguage
keyboard… chaudiere.

Barbara on a grey December day on the island


#12

I was going to suggest Riverdail, but the .com is already in use, so
how about Rivendail?

You’ve got:

Rive - French for riverbank and most of river

Riven - for split apart with a tool

and Dail for your name.

Sounds nice and Rivendail.com is available.

Alison


#13

And in the weird and wonderful world of the internet, again the
proof is that accents will be lost between here and there. Chaudiere
is written with an accent grave while ajoure is written with an
accent aigu. But somehow they get lost in the universe of english
american.

Barbara on another grey day in Canada


#14

I went through the same naming issue a few times in regard to
software products and websites, and eventually came to the following
conclusion.

It would be nice to have a name that describes your product or
service, but you can waste a lot of time and energy trying, only to
find out that every name you think of is already taken. In the end it
is the other way around - your product or service needs to make its
name.

A very important (at the time) computer spreadsheet program had the
name ‘Lotus’ - Lotus 1-2-3. The name had nothing at all to do with
computer spreadsheets, meant nothing at all as far as I know, but
their product really made a name for itself. Same goes for Apple and
Google. In our own filed of interest, I don’t know what the name
Bonny Doon has to do with hydraulic presses, but they sure made that
name mean something with their products, and I think everyone on this
list knows what Bonny Doon is about.

So if you can find a name that describes what you do that’s great,
but if you can’t, pick any name at all that pleases you and just get
on with letting what you do make the name.


#15

I like Alison’s suggestion: riverdail An obvious misspelling, but
like a burr under the saddle, it sticks in your mind.

I had the same problem when I was looking for a name for my company.
Everybody was using new concepts, and it had no “stickiness”.

knew concepts is phonetically the same, but it memorable.

Lee (the saw guy)


#16
Google. In our own filed of interest, I don't know what the name
Bonny Doon has to do with hydraulic presses, but they sure made
that name mean something with their products, and I think everyone
on this list knows what Bonny Doon is about. 

There’s a town called Bonny Doon up in the mountains behind Santa
Cruz, CA. It’s where Lee was living at the time.

Regards
Brian


#17
pick any name at all that pleases you and just get on with letting
what you do make the name. 

Awesome point, thank you!


#18

The name of my company is Honors Gran Jewelry. I grew up across the
street from a well known silversmith named Gran Miner (back when we
rode dinosaurs to town…). I watched and learned from him and his
Navajo apprentices from the time I was 4 years old. He died before I
grew up so he never knew the impact he had on me as an adult
silversmith.

The name of my company honors Gran.

Honors Gran Jewelry
1714 CR 1, Suite 18
Dunedin, Florida 34698


#19

If you were to google Bonny Doon CA, you would come away puzzled
because Alberic’s observation about my living in the town of Bonny
Doon is not quite correct. Bonny Doon and Brigadoon share a common
trait. they are non existant! They are both states of mind. Back in
the early days of CA history, there was a lumber camp that provided
redwood for the building of San Francisco, but once the redwoods were
harvested, the only thing left (also now gone)was a post office. When
I decided to move from the LA area (Manhattan Beach), we wanted to
really get away from the hustle/bustle/mass humanity of So Cal, and
chose the total opposite. Bonny Doon is a geographic area whose
boundaries are the school district. There are a couple of two lane
roads thatwander through it, with only drive ways leading to either
acreage or homes. “There is no there there”.

When I decided to start Bonny Doon Engineering, I was looking for a
distinctive name that would “stick”. It helps to have a good product
to back up the name. Lee (the saw guy)