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Courses recommendations


#1

I am new to the jewelry crafts, and I have already learned much from
the archives and the current discussions here. In particular, the
mention of Viking Knitting in yesterday’s digest was of interest as I
am currently producing various sizes and styles of loop-in-loop
chains.

I would like to solicit recommendations from the members here as far
as what courses would be of benefit for a new goldsmith (avoiding the
term silversmith as it is usually associated with the manufacture of
large items, flatware, etc.). I work full-time in emergency medicine
and am looking at this as a hobby with the potential for added
income. Then again, my idea of a hobby also includes teaching
recreational scuba diving, which includes carrying liability
insurance and maintaining some expensive life support equipment.

In other words I am not adverse to spending some money on training
and decent equipment with which to work, it is just that as a
resident physician I am somewhere on the pay scale higher than a
technician but lower than a nurse. I am looking for courses that
would be condensed (2-3 days when I can fit it into my schedule), not
too expensive (~$500 or so), and that would potentially lead to the
ability to sit for the bench jeweler certification exam.

I would also like some reading recommendations (I have already read
"The Complete Metalsmith" and “Basic Jewelry Making Techniques” cover
to cover), and suggestions as far as how to approach a jeweler with a
request for part-time apprentice experience.

Thanks for your time!

Rudy Bescherer, Jr.


#2

Rudy,

please tell us where you from, so we can help you with classes in
different parts of the country. there are many very good schools and
courses.

Jennifer Friedman
Ventura, CA
@jennifer_friedman


#3

Wow, a resident with enough time and energy to scuba dive and make
jewelry? Amazing.

You don’t say where you are. Assuming you are in the US, in a
metropolitan area, one possibility is taking courses from GIA
(Gemological Institute of America) when they come to your city.

I’m sure many people on the list will recommend Revere Academy,
which I recommend as well, despite having not been there myself.
However, there are many fine schools that can meet your needs
without your having to travel. Check into the ones near you.

While it might be nice to stick with one school and earn a diploma,
it’s not necessary. You can take lots of different classes here and
there and still take the JA bench certification tests.

As to approaching some one for an apprenticeship – the first step
is to have something to offer. Wait until you have enough skill and
experience.

Or, offer to pay for the privilege of working for someone. Because
it’s “tuition” and worth it. How’s that for controversy? What do
people think of that?

As to reading material, your next books:

  • the two large tomes by Oppi Untracht

  • anything by Revere (he has videos too you know)

  • I happen to like the little book by Jinks McGrath, may be out of
    print, and it’s another beginner book, but it covers things in a
    different way, good pictures

Elaine
Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#4
    I would also like some reading recommendations (I have already
read "The Complete Metalsmith" and "Basic Jewelry Making
Techniques" cover to cover), and suggestions as far as how to
approach a jeweler with a request for part-time apprentice
experience. 

My favorite books on jewelry making, in no particular order are:

Theory and Practice of Goldsmithing by Erhard Brepoul, Charles
Lewton-Brain, Tim McCreight
http://www.ganoksin.com/jewelry-books/us/product/0961598492.htm

Jewelry Fundamentals of Metalsmithing by Tim McCreight
http://www.ganoksin.com/jewelry-books/us/product/1880140292.htm

The Encyclopedia of Jewelry-Making Techniques by Jinks McGrath.
http://www.ganoksin.com/jewelry-books/us/product/1561385263.htm

James in SoFl


#5
Or, offer to pay for the privilege of working for someone. 
Because it's "tuition" and worth it.  How's that for controversy? 
What do people think of that? 

I don’t think paying for the privilege of working for someone would
be condoned by the Departments of Labor. If you are engaged in any
way in the production of saleable goods for your employer, you need
to be paid, and paid at least a minimum wage.

Lee Einer
Dos Manos Jewelry
http://www.dosmanosjewelry.com


#6
I  don't think paying for the privilege of working for someone would
be condoned by the  Departments of Labor. If you are engaged in any
way in the production of saleable goods for your employer, you need
to be paid, and paid at least a minimum wage.

Yes, I thought someone would point that out.

I guess what I was thinking of was more along the lines of private
lessons that happened to be at a person’s place of work. Still
illegal?

Elaine
Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#7
    Or, offer to pay for the privilege of working for someone.
Because it's "tuition" and worth it.  How's that for controversy?
What do people think of that? 

I agree with another poster, that if you’re working, you should be
paid. Another aspect to understand is perception. You walk into a
jewelry store, offer to work for them for free in return for learning
the trade. Now, this jewelry store has more than likely $million plus
in inventory. Would YOU be willing to take someone on who offers to
work for free?? It smacks of desperation. The last thing a jeweler
wants near his/her bench is a desperate person. There has got to be a
better way.

Betty


#8
  I guess what I was thinking of was more along the lines of
private lessons that happened to be at a person's place of work.
Still illegal? 

It is not illegal in the US to teach private lessons at a site which
is also a workplace, AFAIK.

Lee Einer
Dos Manos Jewelry
http://www.dosmanosjewelry.com


#9

I am from southern NJ, about 30 minutes east of Philadelphia. Thanks
for the input thus far!

Rudy Bescherer, Jr.


#10

Hi Lee, Saw your post. It is not only legal but is also the best way
to get personalized, focused, teaching at the precise area of
interest and level of the student. Over the years I have taught
workshops for guilds, worked for product manufacturers at trade
shows, consulted for major jewelry manufacturers at their shop and
had people come to my shop to learn. I even had some people come all
the way from Brazil to learn moldmaking (I know some Spanish but we
needed an interpreter for Portuguese). I find that after almost
thirty years in jewelry production that I really enjoy teaching. I’m
not interested in starting a jewelry school. What I really enjoy is
imparting as much as someone can absorb. If you’ve seen my ad in
Metalsmith mag with the byline “Your Creation, Our Passion”, the very
bottom line reads in small print “consider a one week one-on-one
intensive training opportunity”. Some people want to learn a lot
about moldmaking, some focus on the wax work, some on the casting and
some on the finishing (auto and hand). Some take a global approach
and want to learn as much of the total process as they can. All this
is to say that there are folks that want to impart their knowledge to
people that are eager to learn.

John, J.A. Henkel Co., Inc., Moldmaking Casting Finishing, Producing
Solutions For Jewelry Artists