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Computorized milling machine


#1

I’m Looking for one of those computorized milling machines that
you see at those engraving places. The idea is that you can scan
an image into the computor, and it will send coordinates to a
vertical mill, wich in turn carves out a “rendition” of the
image. Does anyone out there in cyberville know who makes these
things, and about how much one is going to set me back?

Thanks.
Tim Goodwin
@tmn8tr


#2

I know I’ve seen CNC machines at Gold International Machinery
Corp. Website ( http://www.goldmach.com ), but I just looked and
didn’t see any mentioned.

I know they used to, maybe still do, carry the Orogold 3-axis
milling machine. It’s around $2,000.

Here’s their phone no. (800)619-GOLD, or 401-324-7200

Dick Caverly


#3

I’m Looking for one of those computorized milling machines that
you see at those engraving places. The idea is that you can scan
an image into the computor, and it will send coordinates to a
vertical mill, wich in turn carves out a “rendition” of the
image. Does anyone out there in cyberville know who makes these
things, and about how much one is going to set me back?

A basic simple machine with 3 axis control starts at $1500 with
very basic control software- you also need a computer, a cad
program such as corel’s and there is a learning curve of several
months. I am looking at one: www.supertech.com/root/taigmill.htm

Rick

Richard D. Hamilton

Fabricated 14k, 18k, and platinum Jewelry
wax carving, modelmaking, jewelry photography

http://www.rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton


#4
I'm Looking for one of those computorized milling machines that
you see at those engraving places. The idea is that you can scan
an image into the computor, and it will send coordinates to a
vertical mill, wich in turn carves out a "rendition" of the
image. Does anyone out there in cyberville know who makes these
things, and about how much one is going to set me back?

Greetings Timothy and all-

What you’re talking about is a CNC mill and probably the best in
the world comes from the US- SERVO. The drive motors on most of
these mills are called servo motors if this tells you anything.
The prices for these machines varies dependent on whether you
require 3, 4, or 5 axis. I was recently pricing 4 axis setups and
I can relate to you as to their cost. The Servo version was about
$26,000., this consisting of the 3 axis mill (x,y,z) and an
electronic indexer and the board and software to control it. This
is what is required to machine like say a class ring or the metal
mold to reproduce it. If your design is 3 dimensional but not
round, you can probably produce it on a 3 axis machine.I have
made metal molds using a 3 axis mill, but this sometimes calls
for some “creative” machining techniques. These are "to die for"
machines I talking about. There are certainly less expensive
machines out there, you just have to consider the amount of
usage,etc. and decide if you can get by with a less expensive
version or not. These machines are software driven, so your
capabilities are going to be limited by what the particular
software you have will do. The top of the line in the software
area right now seems to be one called Artcam II by Delcam or
another by Scanvec called Machine shop. Both of these companies
are on the net with these as their domain names. The prices for
these softwares is about $8,000. Again, there are less costly
versions out there on the market- these two that I mentioned
seem to be the most advanced and the ones to have if money is not
an issue.There is another software called Bobcad which is more
reasonably priced, but I don’t know it’s capabilities. They are
also on the net. I also found a company called Super-tech that is
offering a 3 axis CNC for about $1500. that I am investigating.
The software it uses was written by them and you can download it
off of their web site. I couldn’t get it to run on this computer
as I’m using win95 and it is DOS based. I e-mailed them and
supposedly have the answer to the problem, but have been too busy
lately to try it out. Tim, you might check out a magazine called
Awards and Engraving- they did a comparison of the various
software, what their capabilities are, cost, etc. last year in an
issue. They are located in Bloomfield, Colo. Sorry, don’t have an
address handy. Hope this helps you out and if I can be of further
service to you, e-mail away!

Ricky Low
Jeweler and Engraver
Houston


#5

Dear Tim:

I know the college of Art and Design in Philly, PA actually
teach students how to do this technique. You may want to call
their jewerly design department and ask them some questions about
the mill machines…

DeDe

DeDe Sullivan
Producer
Manhattan Transfer Graphics
Tel: 212-907-1204
FAX: 212-370-9346
E Mail: @dede


#6

Tim,

There is a company out here in Irvine, Calif. that makes
computerized milling machines to operate with a CAD CAMM program
and a computer. I looked into it a couple of years ago. Not a
really inexpensive piece of equipment. They had two models, a
basic and an advanced unit. The basic unit (PNC 2500S) cost
$9,950 and came with a three-axis milling machine, a G-code
driver and a complete software package that included a tutorial,
drawing asnd editing features, and three dimensional design with
viewing angles The designer’s computer uses a plotter to draw a
diagram of the desired model and the computer automatically
produces the three dimensional working prototype. It’s a push a
buton asnd walk away type of thing. The more advanced model (PNC
3000S) cost $11,950. Then for an additional $1,200 you could get
a machine vise, collet set, 16 assorted mills and 20 blocks of
modeling wax, and a sensor. The company is called Roland Digital
Corp. and are at: 1961 McGaw Avenue, Irvine, Claif. 92714,
1-714-975-0560.

Barry


#7
Does anyone out there in cyberville know who makes these
things, and about how much one is going to set me back? 

Gesswein has one for $50,000.00. You better have a really
marketable product at that price. Mark P.


#8

If you want to do a little work yourself & understand your
machine & software there a several low end hobbyist type units
available. Sherline makes a small lathe & mill for about $500.
Them make a complete line of accessories for it. It’s widely sold
in the US, made in CA. However, it doesn’t have CNC capability.
To get that you by a kit with the servo’s, interface boards &
some software. The kit is made specifically for the Sherline.

Home Shop Machinist, a bi-monthly magazine for machine shop
hobbyists has several ads for kits & complete machines every
issue.

Here’s some sites & email addresses that may have more info.

Home Shop Machinist magazine email. vpshop@aol.com

Sherline lathes, mills & accessories

MicroKinetics Corp CNC kits for Sherline
http://www.microkinetics.com

Hanser Gardener Practical CNC Training (books)
http://hansergardner.com

The following companies don’t have emails or sites listed.

ah-ha Design Group Conversion harware & software for Sherline,
612-641-1797. In the UK call Eagland Machine Tools
01420-23830 .

FLASHCUT CNC Complete CNC systems based on Sherline equipment

888-883-5274

MAXNC Sherline kits & other CNC products 602-940-9414

BACK TRACK CNC mills 847-998-0821

I have subscribed to the magazine since it started
publication(15-20 year s ago), but have never done business with
any of the listed companies & hav e no interest in any of them.
Generally speaking, the magazine’s advertiser s have been good to
do business with over the years.

Happy CNC’ing.

Dave


#9

You-all have been going wild on this computerized milling
machine thread — what do you use the thing for?


#10

You-all have been going wild on this computerized milling
machine thread — what do you use the thing for?

I would use it to speed up my die making for use in
hollowforming. As you may know it takes “forever” To carve O1
Tool steel by hand.

-Thanks to all of you Webwarriors out there for your help on the
research end. Looks like a pretty Expensive endeavor for what I
need (more like “WANT”) it for.

Thanks again,
Timothy Goodwin
@tmn8tr


#11

Backtrack has a Sherline mill with 3 controllers for $1500. I’m
very inclined to try this out. It might be a cheap enough
learning experience.

Bruce D. Holmgrain
e-mail: @Bruce_Holmgrain
http:\www.knight-hub.com\manmtndense\bhh3.htm
snail mail: pob 7972, McLean, VA 22106-7972
phone:: 703-593-4652


#12

Tim,

Have you tried masonite dies or Hydraulic press for
hollowforming? Both inexpensive alternatives. Frank