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Companionship in studio


#1

I used to share my then rather large studio, a converted warehouse,
with painters. This worked out really great as we were able to
bounce ideas off each other. We set up in opposite ends of the space
and had a nice sitting area including sofas in the middle. We would
work away in our “corners” and meet up for tea- and lunch breaks etc
in the middle. There we would discuss the ongoing work of each other
or had just generally a jolly good time. Over the years I found that
there was need for some rules re the working space:

private space and -time has to be clearly defined .There are times
when privacy is needed. i.e. that new design your working on is not
quite “there” yet. Your studiopartner walks over and starts talking
about it. That could be very helpful or really disturbing. Or you
think you’ll walk over to your mate to discuss your problem only to
find him/her having “private time with picasso”. And do you really
wanna spoil that? ( we used to have a “frustometer” with a dial that
we could set from ‘don’t talk to me now’ to ‘I am feeling really
good’) worktime/leasuretime needs to be defined .Everybody works
differently and has different needs.(with professional painters
generally no problem, as they were really hard workers) emotional
emergency strategy (i.e.if you blow your top go for a walk outside
and don’t contaminate the studio environment) general studio rules
(i.e. music, access, visitors, security etc) studio environment rules
(i.e. all acids, polishing, varnishing etc done in separate room)

This may all sound very strict and negative, but doesn’t need to be.
Just be aware of your needs and plan for funtime as well! We used to
have a High chair up one wall. This was a comfortable seat 4meters
up and accessible by ladder,yes we had a high ceiling. If you felt
really great, say after that gallery just called you to say that
this and that has sold, you could climb up and wear the crown which
was placed there, and look down to the world from above. Too bad you
had to climb down after a while!

Greetings from the powder in wintery Queenstown, New Zealand.

Juerg

O R B I T Contemporary JEWELLERY
Award Winning Designs
Q U E E N S T O W N - N Z
@Juerg_P_Muff1


#2

Hi Sharron

I used to share my then rather large studio, a converted warehouse,
with painters. This worked out really great as we were able to
bounce ideas off each other. We set up in opposite ends of the space
and had a nice sitting area including sofas in the middle. We would
work away in our “corners” and meet up for tea- and lunch breaks etc
in the middle. There we would discuss the ongoing work of each other
or had just generally a jolly good time. Over the years I found that
there was need for some rules re the working space:

private space and -time has to be clearly defined .There are times
when privacy is needed. i.e. that new design your working on is not
quite “there” yet. Your studiopartner walks over and starts talking
about it. That could be very helpful or really disturbing. Or you
think you’ll walk over to your mate to discuss your problem only to
find him/her having “private time with picasso”. And do you really
wanna spoil that? ( we used to have a “frustometer” with a dial that
we could set from ‘don’t talk to me now’ to ‘I am feeling really
good’) worktime/leasuretime needs to be defined .Everybody works
differently and has different needs.(with professional painters
generally no problem, as they were really hard workers) emotional
emergency strategy (i.e.if you blow your top go for a walk outside
and don’t contaminate the studio environment) general studio rules
(i.e. music, access, visitors, security etc) studio environment rules
(i.e. all acids, polishing, varnishing etc done in separate room)

This may all sound very strict and negative, but doesn’t need to be.
Just be aware of your needs and plan for funtime as well! We used to
have a High chair up one wall. This was a comfortable seat 4meters
up and accessible by ladder,yes we had a high ceiling. If you felt
really great, say after that gallery just called you to say that
this and that has sold, you could climb up and wear the crown which
was placed there, and look down to the world from above. Too bad you
had to climb down after a while!

Greetings from the powder in wintery Queenstown, New Zealand.

Juerg

O R B I T Contemporary JEWELLERY
Award Winning Designs
Q U E E N S T O W N - N Z
@Juerg_P_Muff1


#3
We used to have a High chair up one wall. This was a comfortable
seat 4 meters up and accessible by ladder ... you could climb up and
wear the crown which was placed there, and look down to the world
from above. 

I love this!

I also like the physical description of your studio. Where I am now
we all have separate rooms. Some of the rooms are quite large and
shared by several people, and I do share with someone but she’s never
there. Which is ok. I like to be alone; my mess is my mess and I
don’t generally annoy myself! :slight_smile: I like to have people around too.

Christine in Littleton, Massachusetts
No one deserves lung cancer.