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Cloud Dome lighting options


#1

I just got my cloud dome in the mail today and have already started
experimenting with it.

Oh the excitement!

I was wondering what type of lighting are you guys using with your
cloud domes? Tungsten, fluorescent, incandescent, sunlight? Any tips
for a beginner?

Thanks,
Tracey in NM
http://www.fireflyjewelrydesign.com


#2

I love my Cloud Dome. I use horrible flourescent lighting which is in
my studio and have my digital camera set to flourescent. I can shoot
the picture, load it into my computer, Photoshop it and email all
within 2 minutes. Speed is what I like and my photos are professional
quality.

Sam Patania, Tucson
www.patanias.com


#3

Hi:

I just took some pictures last week by following the lighting advice
in this article

(if the link doesn’t work it’s under “jewelry photography” in Tips
from the Jeweler’s Bench" on the Ganoskin website. I got the
lightbulbs from a local photo shop and the clamp on light fixtures
from Home Depot. The set-up worked perfectly. As far as I can tell,
I will need a professional photographer only very rarely now. The
only thing is to be careful not to leave anything unattended. The
lightbulbs and fixtures get extremely hot. Also,you don’t need
additional diffuser because you have a cloud dome already.

Good luck
Kim Starbard


#4

We tend to use flourescent tubes which are not only cooler so they
can be left on without having to wear shorts but also they give a
whiter light which suits our work. We still have to adjust some of
the shots on screen and they are by no means perfect but we could not
possibly send each new piece to a photographer - either cost wise or
time wise. Taking ones own photos means one is able to finish a piece
in the morning and have it for sale by lunchtime - one is chuffed!

Good luck
Andrew


#5

I’ve been using a 5000K Flood Lamp in a reflector. The Cloud Dome is
so easy to use, that’s all I’ve needed. The photos come out great.

Cindy Crounse
Refined Designs


#6

Kathy:

Take your photos back to the processer and have them correct the
color. Their machine is printing for another lighting condition. Your
photos taken in daylight should be the right color as there is
nothing to change the daylite color. I would also suggest that you
use a lighter gray background. Something like pearl gray. You can get
felt patches 12X12 inches in lots of different colors.

ken


#7

Thanks for all the suggestions, I plan to try them all to see which
best suits my current camera and situation. I’m thinking I need to
go back to what I used to use, lower ASA slide film, like the Fuji
Velvia slide film, forget pictures, and quit being cheap by taking
my film to be processed at Wal-Mart. Slide film needs to be sent out
of the area where I live to be processed and cannot be done in one
hour so planning ahead needs to be done. I used the 400ASA on the
suggestion of a friend who tries to make me think she knows it all
and guess what?? All right, some pictures were OK but most were not.
I have a digital camera on the "want to buy/need to have " list, you
know, the one we all have then we need to pay the electric bill or by
food?? Life just gets in the way sometimes. Thanks again to all of
you; I will post in the future when I have tried some of your
suggestions.

Kathy Anderson


#8

Kathy, since you’ve decided to send your film out for processing,
have you tried York Photo Processing? I used to use them back in the
days before my digital camera. I was a shutterbug and was constantly
having film developed, but couldn’t afford normal photo processing
prices. Their turn around time was relatively quick (roughly a week
or less) and their prices just could not be beat by anyone. Not even
Wally World.

Check them out here: http://www.yorkphoto.com/helppricing/t_=0

Scroll down to just about the bottom of the page and you’ll find
their pricing for slide developing.

Hope this helps,
Betty