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Casting Shibu-ichi alloy


#1

I’m a sculptor casting unique bronze sculpture and would like to
cast some small work using the Japanese alloy Shibu-ichi. Would you
have any on it’s quality for casting and any
peculiarities involved in casting it? I will be casting 5 to 10 oz.
pieces and some will require silver brazing. I have concerns as to
whether there will be some reticulation problems with this alloy.
What can I expect regarding surface color and how will it take the
patina? How will the end result differ in color and nuance from
using regular bronze alloy?

Most importantly, could you give me an idea of the pour temperature?

Thanks for any help you can give me with these questions.

Terry Kreiter


#2
    I'm a sculptor casting unique bronze sculpture and would like
to cast some small work using the Japanese alloy Shibu-ichi. 

Which alloy of shibuichi? How much silver in the mix?

Brian Adam
Auckland NEW ZEALAND


#3

Not near enough Shibuichi generally casts well.

25% melts @ 1750 F
15% melts @ 1825 0F

What alloy of shibuichi? There is a vary broad range starting at 5%
and each colors differently. What patina solution? If you are making
your own alloy you should do a set of patination tests. There are no
short cuts, I am afraid you will just have to do the work yourself.
There are just too many variables to what are very general questions.

Bill

Reactive Metals Studio, Inc.
PO Box 890 * Clarkdale, AZ 86324
Ph-928/634-3434 * Ph-800/876-3434 * Fax-928/634-6734
E-mail- @Michele_Deborah_Bill
Catalog- www.reactivemetals.com


#4
I'm a sculptor casting unique bronze sculpture and would like to
cast some small work using the Japanese alloy Shibu-ichi. Which
alloy of shibuichi? How much silver in the mix? 

I could add:

To help you a little, take a look at a phase diagram such as the one
found in this pdf document:

http://tinyurl.com/ajjxw

and choose from a selection of useable alloys from 10% to 70% sil
content.

Note that while the liquidus temps are different, and rise as the
alloy is closer to 100% copper, most (all those between 8.8% and 92%
copper) share a solidus of 778 degC (1432 degF).

Which is about the temperature of my hard solder.

Brian Adam
Auckland NEW ZEALAND