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Casting machine upgrade


#1

We have been casting for over 30 years with a Galoni Perfacast
Junior centrifugal machine. I will need to purchase a new gold
casting machine soon. I would like to get anyones opinion on what
type and manufacturer to buy, vacuum verses centrifugal. I cast
about twice a week usually 4 to 6 flasks. Please email me or call me
@ 800-617-6667 with ay suggestions. Thank you in advance for your
time. Marie


#2

Good morning Marie,

I noticed that you were possibly looking to upgrade and purchase a
new centrifugal casting machine.

May I suggest our #750 Giant Casting Machine which I could offer to
you at a special Orchid Member price of $ 285.00.

If you need to contact me for any additional regarding
our casting machines, please feel free to call our toll-free number:
1-(800) 332-5573 or you can contact me at my personal E-Mail Address:
Lucadent@verizon.net

We are located in Brooklyn, New York and have been manufacturing
centrifugal casting machines since 1930.

Thank you very much,
Sincerely,
Richard Lucas, V.P.
http://community.webtv.net/lucadent


#3

Marie,

Both types of casting machines have there place depending on what
type of work you are casting. I have both types in my shop but I
must admit that I rarely use my vacuum caster. I prefer the
centrifugal caster because it has been more dependable on a wider
variety of castings. If you are casting heavy objects either machine
can be useful but if you are casting light weight filigree style
items your success rate will improve with the centrifugal.

My vacuum caster is an older machine with a vacuum on one side for
debubbling my investment and the other side is a vacuum caster. This
machine is the type were you place the flask on top of the machine.
I have learned how to overcome the drawbacks of this type of setup
but my suggestion is that if you wish to use a vacuum caster you
should get the type of machine were the flask is lowered into a
sleeve. With that type of machine you will use a perforated flash
that allows an even draw of suction.

The other benefit of a centrifugal machine is that there is
basically no maintenance. My machine is 25 years old and I have
never had to do anything to it. The vacuum caster requires regular
maintenance and if a pump goes bad they are a little costly to
replace.

Good Luck
Greg DeMark
email: greg@demarkjewelry.com
Website: www.demarkjewelry.com


#4

I was going to ask a similar question. I would like to know the
pros/cons of centrifugal, vacuum, and/or induction casting from the
people that are using them.


#5

Hello Tim and all, I use both Centrifugal and vacuum, I use my
centrifugal casters more than the vacuum, My main reason for this is
the cost of perforated flasks, and I=92m a tight wad, when I have to
compete with off shore casters for my crumbs.

If I had the money to spend, I would jump on a Neutec system from
Rio. In the late 70s a company I worked for in Los Angeles, had a
very early Induction machine that was unbelievable for it=92s day, the
quality of the castings was far superior to an open system .

I guess vacuum assist is OK for a cheap way out, but if you have the
clientele and enough work to lay out 20 or 30 thou. Go for an
induction system I really also think that centrifugal casting is not
far from becoming a thing of the past, for many reasons safety being
at the top of the list, in 30 years, I=92ve seen and received quite a
few burns, mostly from investment breaking down because some one
tried to get 1 extra row of pieces on a tree.

Another thing to consider is also during the casting process with
either vacuum or centrifugal, whether using a torch, or an electro
melt you will be exposing your molten metal to Oxygen, during the
pour or cast unless of course you are casting in a shielded
atmosphere. Memco used to sell a pretty nice unit for under 4000.00
back about 10 years ago, not sure if they are still around or not
but they were a good entry level commercial quality system for small
shop, but no where near as nice as the Neutec units.

I think it has become pretty well recognized that Vacuum casting
does yield superior results as far as getting the gases out and
yielding castings with less porosity if the burn out was good and
clean and the investment mixed correctly, Kind of like I think
blueberry is the best ice cream you know. ;^}

It all depends on budget, talent, or knowledge and how much will you
use it. And how good you want your casting to be.

Help others make informed buying decisions with Neutec USA. We
welcome your opinions and experiences with their products ordering,
customer service and and over all satisfaction.

Write an Anonymous Review
http://www.ganoksin.com/resources/review.php?id=1725

Kenneth Ferrell
www.shadras.com


#6
   I think it has become pretty well recognized that Vacuum
casting does yield superior results as far as getting the gases out
and yielding castings with less porosity if the burn out was good
and clean and the investment mixed correctly, Kind of like I think
blueberry is the best ice cream you know. 

I love this forum for how diffferent people have such different
experiences.

I use a centfrifugal kerr long arm for silver, 150-400 grams per
flask, 4-6 flasks per casting that are 3"x7". I use a neycraft
centrifugal for gold. I cast my own line for wholesale, and I cast
other metalsmiths designs in sterling and 14 kt, plus my own 14kt, 18
kt, 22kt yellow gold and 14 and 18 kt white golds. I have done
hundreds to thousands of pieces per week.

I use a hand mixer to mix investment, I get them at thrift stores
for a buck or two.

I am a small caster, but I just finished an unusually large order of
1200 sterling toggles, 2400 pieces (twelve pounds of silver!), it
took me three weeks to cast and tumble them. I torch melt with
oxy-acetelyene and I have virtually no problems with porosity. We
make rings that we have to hammer up to size, we cast prongs that
don’t break, we shape and bend pieces after they are cast and they
don’t break which is one symptom of porosity. Once in while I will
have a divit I have to solder with gold.

I just started using Cobb’s prime white 14 kt alloy. I am adjusting
to the higher flask temp that you are supposed to cast at. There
seems to be a difference is how thin pieces come out. Seems to be
more tempermental about cracking.

Seems like the common thread about casting is that using oxy-acet
and centrifugal has lower quality castings, not true for me. It is
economical for me to do it this way. Which ever way you cast, you
develop a feel for it. It is a balance of proper mixing of
investment, proper burnout, proper flask temp when you cast. I am
low tech, problems have been far and few between and it is cheap to
fix or replace whatever breaks. I needed a low investment way to
start, ten years ago.

Richard in Denver


#7
   I just started using Cobb's prime white 14 kt alloy. I am
adjusting to the higher flask temp that you are supposed to cast
at. There seems to be a difference is how thin pieces come out. 
Seems to be more tempermental about cracking. 

Update on my using Cobb’s new white gold that doe not have to be
rhodium plated. I have made about 4 rings, and it is not easy to
work with.

Has the problems you would expect with higher nickle content, I
won’t use it any more. Too brittle, pieces cracked, hard to solder,
harder to set.stones in. Made my life harder for two weeks. Been
there, done that, over it. Great fantasy.

Richard in Denver