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CAD Cool


#1

Hi All,

I’ve been busy and hunkering underground with projects. However, I
couldn’t resist posting this one to the group. I met Bathsheba at an
informal Burning Man gathering in Boston who brought three of these
cool hand held sculptures. I held these little beauties in my hand
and had to show and tell.

http://www.bathsheba.com

Beyond the usual CAD stuff for making bling rings with stone in
place, this rocked my boat. Personally, this is the most exciting
thing for working in CAD I have ever seen. I have heard the
technology is doing the same technology for gold and silver, but the
weight for steel and bronze seems just perfect.

Enjoy all.

-k

M E T A L W E R X
School for Jewelry and the Metalarts
50 Guinan St.
Waltham, MA 02451
781 891 3854
www.metalwerx.com


#2

Hi Karen

I agree this is the most exciting use of CAD that I’ve seen and
thanks for bringing it to our attention. I don’t make convention
jewelry so three stones rings and such don’t do it for me. This is
not a criticism of those who do make those things.

I spent some time looking at Bathsheba’s site in amazement at the
things she’s producing and the technology that allows her to make
them. The thing that struck me is the perfection of the mathematical
models of the sculpture.

Wm Morris once wrote an essay about the ‘touch of the hand’ in
making things. The essence of his essay was as I remember it was that
no matter how hard one tries to make a thing perfect, one can’t
because of ‘the touch of the hand’. The evidence remains that the
object was hand made. Perhaps if it’s done just so; there’s even a
little bit of the maker’s soul in the object. These mathematical
models are so perfect that they look a bit alien in their perfection.

KPK
If the work you do doesn’t change you; you’re not doing it right.


#3

Too cool! I’ve admired Bathsheba’s work for a while on the website,
and I envy you the chance to see and hold these wonderful
sculptures. They really do bring the perfection of mathematics into
the physical world, and that direct metal printing process is one of
the most innovative things I’ve ever seen.

Janet Kofoed
http://users.rcn.com/kkofoed


#4
http://www.bathsheba.com 

Thank you Karen, for sharing this link. I got caught up in it and
the many mathematics/art links, and lost myself for a couple of
hours. Just came up for air, and had to thank you. Fabulous
resources.

T


#5

Thanks Karen,

It was good to see Sheba’ get some recognition on Orchid.

http://www.bathsheba.com

Her work has been an inspiration to me because it pushes the envelope
what’s possible to achieve with CAD/CAM.

It takes a special (or perhaps it’s spacial) :wink: kind of creativity
to gracefully mesh the area where Art and Math intersect. Maybe it’s
because my mind doesn’t work that way that I’ve been fascinated with
that genre of computer aided design.

I’d like to share some of my Math/Art bookmarks, including the site
of Rinus Roelofs, another sculptor who uses Rhino to create art with
a mathematical sensibility.

http://www.rinusroelofs.nl/rhinoceros/rhinoceros-00.html
http://www.evolution-of-genius.de


http://www.susqu.edu/facstaff/b/brakke/evolver
http://www.linas.org/art-gallery/numberetic/numberetic.html
http://www.seb.cc

Regards,
Jesse
http://jdkjewelry3d.blogspot.com