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Boric acid


#1

By the way, boric acid (in a powder form) is available at almost
any pharmacy, in the eye care section. Took me a while to figure
that one out! :slight_smile:

I usually buy the largest jar I can get- make sure you buy
powdered boric acid- it also can be found as crystals (that
doesn’t work well).Rubbing alcohol (isopropal) works just fine to
mix with.

Rick
Richard D.
Hamilton,Jr.
Goldsmith
<http://www.rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton


#2

By the way, boric acid (in a powder form) is available at almost
any pharmacy, in the eye care section. Took me a while to figure
that one out! :slight_smile:

Dave boric works really well for firescale Boracic acid is what
I use I would check first before using boric over diamonds in case
its different our chemist seems to sell both. Some books might
mention mixing with methylated spirits instead of water it does
dissolve better but its messier Gerald *

  opalsopalsopals*
  *     Arrowtown Opals & Jewellery             *
  *       po. box 17 Arrowtown S.I              *
  *             New Zealand                     *
  *     Ph 64 3 4421288 Fax 64 3 4421488        *
  *  http://www.netprophet.co.nz/nzsi/opals.htm *

#3

By the way, boric acid (in a powder form) is available at
almost any pharmacy, in the eye care section. Took me a while
to figure that one out! :slight_smile:

I usually buy the largest jar I can get- make sure you buy
powdered boric acid- it also can be found as crystals (that
doesn't work well).Rubbing alcohol (isopropal) works just fine
to mix with.

Actually it is my belief that denatured alcohol should be used
for your mix. BTW, yellow gold does not need to be coated - all
stones however, do. Mike


#4

Hi,

I’m glad you clarified me on that! I just thought you had
"happy fingers" and had typo’d! Where would one find Boracic
acid?

Dave Sebaste


#5

A 50%/50% solution of boric acid and alcohol works well for
firescale prevention. Ignite the alcohol after dipping the piece
and as it burns off it leaves a coating of the boric acid. Flux
your joints and pickle after soldering and your on your way.

A long time ago, I was using boric acid and alcohol for coating
jewelery prior to firing when I noticed a slight burning
sensation in my left hand. Upon looking down, I noticed that the
whole jar was ablaze. In my haste to put it down, I managed to
spill it over most of my hand. I had more than a little trouble
getting it out. Not too big a deal. No real damage to my bench or
any tools. My hand required six or eight months to heal. Since
that time I have forbidden my mechanics from using the mixture.
Instead, we just use the powdered boric acid. Seems that static
and grease can go a long way toward causing the boric acid to
stick to the work. It’s quicker, too, as one isn’t inclined to
wait for the alcohol to burn off before firing.

http://www.knight-hub.com/manmtndense/bhh3.htm e-mail:
@Bruce_Holmgrain snail mail: POB 7072, McLean, VA
22106-7972, U.S.A.


#6

Thought it should be Denatured alcohol. Not sure why.


#7

Bruce,

Thanks for the warning re: dangers of alcohol/boric acid. I
have made it a practice to immediately cover and move the
container I use out of the way before lighting my torch. I will
keep in mind your episode, though, since it only takes forgetting
once to provide an obviously painful reminder.

Sharon


#8

I have to reiterate here that boric acid for silversmithing is a
BAD idea if you’re serious about avoiding firescale on silver.
Boric acid for gold works fine. I’m really surprised you
silversmiths out there don’t seem to know about Pripps flux from
reading the posts. Pripps is described in Tim McReight’s Complete
Metalsmith book but I have an easier recipe that Peter Rowe sent
me and will post it tonite…Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html


#9

Actually it is my belief that denatured alcohol should be used
for your mix. BTW, yellow gold does not need to be coated - all
stones however, do.

I don’t know if I’d want to fire up too many machined yellow
gold watchbands without coating them. Plenty of other hard to
reach areas on yellow gold work. Pretty hard to match some of
those finishes. What’s the point of coating the stone?

Bruce D.Holmgrain E-mail: Manmountaindense@Knight-Hub.com WWW:
http://www.knight-hub.com/manmtndense/bhh3.htm Snail Mail: POB 7972,
McLean, VA 22106


#10

A> I don’t know if I’d want to fire up too many machined yellow

gold watchbands without coating them. Plenty of other hard to
reach areas on yellow gold work. Pretty hard to match some of
those finishes. What’s the point of coating the stone?

I’m not sure that the type of alcohal really matters as long as
it burns cleanly and doesn’t contain additives like benzene. I
have to agree that coating gold makes a big difference- heating
alloys with a goodly percentage of copper does produce something
akin to firescale if they are unprotected. Rose gold alloys
especially. Coating stones is a good idea- but protecting them
from more than moderated heat is best.

Rick Hamilton
Goldsmith
<http://www.rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton