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Bezels


#1

To say that you are cutting the B wire twice at the compleation
of the circle, or oval,etc so the cut on wire matches? Did get
it right?

JimR


#2

To say that you are cutting the B wire twice at the compleation
of the circle, or oval,etc so the cut on wire matches? Did get
it right?

Damn, its hard to make words work here. Yes, I think you got it
right, maybe. Lets say for simplicity you have a piece of bezel
wire stretched out in front of you. If you cut through it with
the shears, then those two pieces will match when you put them
back together right? You’ve cut a straight vertical cut, but the
edges of the cut bevel away from you if you look at them under a
loupe. Using this principle, you have to keep your cuts
identical, in that your shears don’t flip over when you do the
second cut, or your bevel will change (I think?) Your scissors
stay in your hand and you use the same two finger holes in them
when you cut the other edge trying to fit the length to the
stone. The bezel wire also stays in the same relative position so
its as if the join is from making one cut through one piece. I
have a piece of tape on one leg of the scissors which I keep on
the bottom when I make the cut each time so I don’t change the
position of the scissors when I cut the other end. You make the
cut with the outside surface of the bezel facing you for each
cut. Don’t flip it over, I also put a small mark inside the bezel
wire showing bezel base so I don’t lose orientation. Because this
edge has a bevel when the two pieces go together they form a
perfect joint if your vertical cut is perfectly straight which is
not hard to do. This is all really deadly simple and completely
eliminates filing to fit edges together and gives a better join
with more surface area in the join. IS IT CLEAR YET? Dave

Art Jewelry for Conscious People
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