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Best optical visor?

Sharron,

I have had great success with .99 cent glasses in a variety of
magnifications, the price is right. I also buy the very small frame
glasses that fit into a tube similar to a lipstick. They enable me
to look away easily without having to take of the glasses. I find
the visors bulky and heavy.

My original visor was simply a metal band, adjustable, that fit
around the head, with the typical lens thing in front. Unfortunately
this was among my stolen stuff and I cannot find a similar one
anywhere. Teresa

Sharron, Not everyone wears prescription glasses and there are times
when you need magnification. Joel

Joel Schwalb
@Joel_Schwalb
www.schwalbstudio.com

Hi Sharron and all -

    I also have been using regular prescription glasses which are
stronger than my regular reading glasses and haven't used my
optical visors since. But now I wonder why everyone doesn't do
this> What are the reasons people actually use the visors as
opposed to eyeglasses? 

One thing different about the optivisor is that it allows us to wear
our glasses at the same time. It magnifies over the prescription
glasses correction. This allows me to have optivisors in several
strengths for different needs - rather than several pairs of
prescription glasses.

Not everyone has simple prescriptions where the eyes are the same to
be able to just buy stronger reading glasses (which are not made with
safety material) at a drugstore. My (progressive trifocal)
prescription glasses are made with the polycarbonate lens for safety
and they cost about $200+. Never needed glasses until my 40th
birthday. Started out using the cheap “readers” and now, it seems
that my prescription changes every other year - and that gets costly.

Also, I seem to have missed it in this string, but, optivisor makes
lenses in glass and, recently, I noticed they are using plastic for
lenses as well. I’ve always used the glass ones and they last
forever. Fortunately the parts are repairable or replaceable and we
can just pick up and swap a new strength of lens when needed.

I felt really weird when I started wearing the optivisor back in the
70’s - but, now I feel naked working without it. I’ve gotten used to
the scratches in metal looking like canyons. :slight_smile: They still do the
job - so, I’ve never invested in a new system.

Aloha,
Cynthia in Honolulu

I also have found the reason in using Opti-Visors and combination
with my half-frame lenses way back when…decades ago! I have spoken
many times before that lense number 5 is best for me!, why? I don’t
have to bend over the bench-peg too close to see that I am doing.
a.k.a. “Hunch Back of Notre Dame”…:>) neck spasms, back aches,
lousy posture, eye fatigue…all because of poor lense and eye glass
fittings…Gerry, the Cyber-Setter!!!

 My original visor was simply a metal band, adjustable, that fit
around the head, with the typical lens thing in front.
Unfortunately this was among my stolen stuff and I cannot find a
similar one anywhere. 

Teresa, The style magnifer you describe is generally offered in
dental lab catalogs and is called The Almore Binocular Loupes.You
might try Zahn Dental Co. 800-496-9500 They also carry other styles
which are less confining than the optivisor. Joe Dule

I have purchased several magnifying visors, ones that have a velcro
strap in the back and several flip-down plastic lenses (you
determine the degree of power required - 2.2, 1.1, or 1.5x “loupe”)
from Northern Tool for the price of about $5 each (MP242C Multi
Power Head Magnifier. For that price, you can buy several and not
worry when you wear it out.

Their web site list this under head magnifiers, along with a more
expensive ($24) model. www.northerntool.com

On another note - The construction isn’t designed to last a
lifetime, but the price is right. These are not ANSI approved, so
if you are planning to use them in a grinding operation you might
want to wear safety glasses, too.

Mark