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Bench Grinder


#1

Hi! I just found a 6", 1/3 H.P. Bench Grinder. Does anyone know
how and IF this can be converted into a buffer?

Thanks

Kathie


#2

Hi! I just found a 6", 1/3 H.P. Bench Grinder. Does anyone know
how and IF this can be converted into a buffer?

Yes - very easily. You just need to buy a spindle to hold the
buff and screw it on the shaft. Any jeweler’s supplies would
have them, like Swest (1-800-527-5057). Should be less than $5.

Jill
@jandr
http://members.tripod.com/~jilk


#3

Hi Kathy, Yes the grinder can be converted to a buffer very
easily. Basically you need to know the shaft size of the wheel
that is on it. Also is the grinding wheel on the right hand or
the left hand side. After you get this you can order
a buffer spindle from Rio Grande or Graves. The Graves web site
home page is http://www.rockhounds.com/graves/index.html You can
order a catalog form them which will not only have the necessary
spindle but also the buffs and compounds in various and sundry
textures at pretty good prices also. Ed Ward Ward’s Stone Creations


#4

Hi! I just found a 6", 1/3 H.P. Bench Grinder. Does anyone know
how and IF this can be converted into a buffer?

You should get a dust collector too- the dust will otherwise
rule your life and every posession will be covered with it. Even
with a dust collector it escapes, and it will destroy regular
vacuum cleaners. A dust collector will eventually pay for itself
if you do gold work, and refine the stuff.

A helpful hint…

Rick
Richard D. Hamilton

Fabricated 14k, 18k, and platinum Jewelry
wax carving, modelmaking, jewelry photography

http://www.rick-hamilton.com
@rick_hamilton


#5
Hi! I just found a 6", 1/3 H.P. Bench Grinder. Does anyone
know how and IF this can be converted into a buffer?

Kathy, I was told to cut off the threaded part of the shaft . .
. then screw on the spindles. See my reply elsewhere in this
area . . .


#6
 Hi! I just found a 6", 1/3 H.P. Bench Grinder. Does anyone
know how and IF this can be converted into a buffer? Yes - very
easily.  You just need to buy a spindle to hold the buff and
screw it on the shaft.  Any jeweler's supplies would have them,
like Swest (1-800-527-5057).  Should be less than $5. Jill >>

Just one more thing . . . it was suggested that the threaded
portion of the shaft be “cut off” before screwing the spindle
onto the shaft. Reason, it fits better into the dust collector,
and spins more evenly. I purchased a metal cutting hack saw
(white blade) at Sears, and was able to cut off the threaded part
in a few minutes (took a few minutes for each end- mine was the
double shafted - right and left) One also has to remember . …
when you order you have to specify which spindle you want . .
.left or right or both. I think I paid less than $4.00 each when
I ordered from Indian Jeweler’s Supply.


#7

not just a helpful hint but consider it a necessity for health
reasons. black lung is not a pretty disease . remember how many
of your polishing compounds are silica based not to mention the
cotton fiber from the buffs. ask your health insurance provider
about the hazards of silica and cotton dust. be smart, be healthy
,you are going to breath this stuff for a lot of years. start
your protection earlyin your career and enjoy a long and
prosperous one. my two cents on an ounce. Frank


#8

Kathy! Please don’t cut anything off a motor shaft. There are
thread on spindles available from several sources. If you cut
the threads off you maybe left with a shaft that is to short to
do anything with. If you use a spindle that locks on with set
screws that tighten onto the shaft then the threads will get
burred and you will have later problems if you try to use a
flange and nut to hold things (Grinding wheels) on. If you use a
threaded spindle you also will probably need to get a thinner
nut to tighten against the spindle so that it is locked on. You
thread the nut on first then the spindle. You tighten the nut
against the spindle by rotating it in the opposite direction from
the one that you used to put it on with. I can’t tell you
clockwise or counterclockwise because I don’t know which side of
the grinder you are putting the spindle on. This locks it on so
that it doesn’t loosen. Set screws are used to lock on spindles
on plain shafts not threaded ones. If you ever build any of your
own equipment always make sure that the rotation of the device
will tend to tighten things. If you put a right handed thread on
the left side of a machine it can come off usually to the
detriment of the device and or the operator. Same thing happens
if you put a left handed thread on the right side of the machine.
Also never stand in front of a grinding wheel when the machine is
first turned on. If the wheel has cracked it will disintegrate in
the first few minutes of running and the sharp pieces will be
thrown at you. A lot of people have never been instructed in the
safe operation of buffing and grinding equipment and they do get
hurt. You may do it a thousand times without any problems but the
1001 it breaks and they are picking shards of a silicon carbide
wheel out of your face or chest. Power equipment can be
dangerous. How many of us use Dremel or Foredom tools with out
face protection. Far too many I know, I’ve been in a hurry and
haven’t worked under a shield or with a face plate. I’ve had
loose pieces flung past my head too many times. We all have done
stuff that in a machine shop would get us fired because of the
danger to others and ourselves. We should start a thread on shop
safety. Ed Ward Ward’s Stone Creations