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Beginner's corner - alloying colored golds


#1

Hi Ganoksin it is I super novice again spurned on buy inactive brain
transmissions, brought on by reading articles about innovations in
the jewelry world. First & Foremost thank you Mr. Gerry Lewy you know
why. New York Ganoksin members (students mainly like me) please if
your in the NYC area at the 92nd Street YWCA jewelry school which is
getting hot hot hot for the summer Mr. Lewy will be there in a few
months to teach do not miss the event or else your going to really
hate yourselves. Mr. Jonathan Wall will tell you when Mr. Lewy will
be there, get your seat in the Stonesetting class given by this
Master Teacher do not wait.

Okay i had a question a real one.

i always admired rings worn by a Dental technician while she was
preparing me for the dental procedures i was having, she said she
purchased them in Puerto Rico in a particular town, she was wearing
lavender gold, with purple stones, Blue gold with blue stones and
Green gold, i had never seen gold prepared that way nor have i again.
I get kinda angry that in NYC of all places jewelers stick to the
boring white, yellow rose and occasionally green but why??? i mean
why not alloy and do colorful gold??? Please exactly can someone
show me illustrations of this being done or pictures of gold jewelry
that is alloyed or dyed to match the stones set??? if you can’t do
that at the least would someone tell me how to create lavender /
purple, blue, or green??? thanks!

the new girl Sabra.


#2

Well doesn’t the lack of coloured golds say to you business
opportunity?

Blue gold can be alloyed, but I think it’s an intermetallic, so the
surface comes off. Green gold is green gold Lavendar… haven’t even
heard of it… maybe it was a Shakudo, that can have a purple colour.

Regards Charles A.


#3

Sabrina,

Green gold has an alloy with a high percentage of silver and small
amount of copper and zinc. If I remember correctly Purple or
lavender gold is made with an alloy of aluminum but it is very
brittle so best used for inlay work or small parts. I am not sure
about blue gold and I know there are a few members that have vast
knowledge of gold alloys that might answer but my guess would be an
alloy with cobalt.

Greg DeMark
http://www.natureinspiredjewelry.com


#4

there is a digital book that is being sold online all about the
different alloy combinations. it primarily talks about enameling
alloys but there is info about all the different colours. you can
get it on the ganoksin site and it costs next to nothing.

http://www.ganoksin.com/listing/ecom-catshow/dab.html

les


#5

thanks for answering i’d like to join in with the others talking
about CAD / CAM Vs FABRICATION but i’m just taking my first Rhino
class this week (Lol) thanks again i’m saving this e-mail. I think
colored Gold is hot !!!


#6
thanks for answering i'd like to join in with the others talking
about CAD / CAM Vs FABRICATION but i'm just taking my first Rhino
class this week (Lol) thanks again i'm saving this e-mail. I think
colored Gold is hot !!!!!! 

I’m using Rhino at the moment, the place where I study was looking
at Jewel CAD, but they weren’t interested in educational discounts,
so it sort of tilted the CAD direction to Rhino.

What I find about Rhino is that the interface isn’t as nice as other
packages, however if this is all you ever use then you’ll have no
conflicting comparison and it fine.

What Rhino does that’s really nice is that it’s.stl output is A1,
meaning you draw it and can CAM it right off the bat. With the
graphics packages I use, although making models is a dream, there is
no native .stl output, so you have to clean up the models for CAM.

A down side to Rhino (it isn’t a down side as far as manufacture
goes), is that it’s render isn’t that nice.

Regards Charles A.