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Aspiring Jeweler requesting help


#1

Well, at least I finally figured out how to work this thing…

Anyway, Im an aspiring Jeweler. I took classes in HS and learned
techniques to make Jewelry from sheet metal, but the problem is, I
dont know where to buy sheets of precious/semi-precious metals, the
ones I HAVE found only tell you the elemental composition of the
metal, and I dont know it, so could someone tell me either:

A: what is the elemental composition for Fools gold (i think its
also called Jewelers gold) and what the composition for Nickel
Silver, so i can attempt to purchase them off the site.

B: An EASIER site to use than the Argen Corporations site

All help being appreciated! Thank you!
Dominic


#2

Here is a site for technical info.
http://www.technicalmaterials.com/metal_prop/index.html

One place to check for ordering
http://www.onlinemetals.com/


#3
    A: what is the elemental composition for Fools gold (i think
its also called Jewelers gold) and what the composition for Nickel
Silver, so i can attempt to purchase them off the site. 

Fools gold is iron pyrite, and not at all gold, nor is it anything
like it, except that it is yellow. Its composition is FeS2.

Nickel silver is typically an alloy of nickel, copper and zinc. It’s
interesting to note that “nickel silver” actually contains no silver
at all. I strongly advise you to NOT use it for jewelry
applications, as many people have an allergy to nickel. You may use
it for years before someone with an allergy pops up, but when you
do, it ain’t pretty. Sterling and fine silver are both inexpensive
when compared to other jewelry metals, and far less dangerous than
nickel.

    B: An EASIER site to use than the Argen Corporations site 

The site that sponsors this newsgroup has an industry resources
page. There, you can find all of the metals sources you need:

James in SoFl


#4
Nickel silver is typically an alloy of nickel, copper and zinc.
It's interesting to note that "nickel silver" actually contains no
silver at all. I strongly advise you to NOT use it for jewelry
applications, as many people have an allergy to nickel.

As one with a nickel allergy, I’m all for avoiding it in pieces that
will come into contact with skin. But if the design keeps the nickel
away from skin contact, or the the piece functionally doesn’t come
into contact with skin (e.g., a brooch), then there’s no reason to
avoid it.

Christine in Littleton, Massachusetts


#5
what is the elemental composition for Fools gold (i think its also
called Jewelers gold)

Sorry if this has already been answered (I tend to be about a day
behind on my posts), but I’m guessing that you’re thinking of a
yellow metal variously called Jeweler’s Bronze or Merlin’s Gold.
This metal is truly neither bronze nor gold, but actually red brass,
which is 85% copper and 15% zinc.

You can find red brass and nickel stock (sheet, wire, and tubing) at
Indian Jewelers Supply:

Both metals are great for practicing your piercing, filing, and
forming techniques before moving on to more expensive metals, but
mind what James in SOFL said about the nickel allergy and be sure to
make your customers aware of this danger if you intend to sell
nickel pieces.

Most importantly, experiment, and have fun!

Jessee Smith
www.silverspotstudio.com
Cincinnati, Ohio


#6

Fools gold from a prospectors standpoint is iron pyrite or sulfide
found in quartz.

Manganese bronze - really a brass-- could maybe be a fools gold too…
It is gold colored and doesn’t really tarnish. Also called high
strength yellow brass… See www.copper.org for almost everything on
copper.

it is alloy 86500 or about 55-60% copper, 36-40 % zinc wit a little
tin, iron nickel aluminum and manganese… cartridge case brass is
70% copper 30% zinc

jesse


#7
As one with a nickel allergy, I'm all for avoiding it in pieces
that will come into contact with skin. But if the design keeps the
nickel away from skin contact, or the the piece functionally
doesn't come into contact with skin (e.g., a brooch), then there's
no reason to avoid it. 

My experience of having participated an the manufacture and sale of
thousands of jewelry items made with nickel silver, has led me to
believe that it is impossible to work with this metal without
contaminating your work space. Although the pieces we made and sold
were not designed to contact skin, polishing cloth contamination
caused my wife to develop allergic sensitization which contributed
to the development of Reynodes. Since nickel is all around us in
the form of stainless steel and other alloys, it would be healthier
not to become sensitized. Further the solders and fluxes often used
for nickel may also pose health hazards. That said I still keep a
pile of nickel silver sheet and wire which I play around with while
working on new ideas.

Cheers Martin


#8
Although the pieces we made and sold were not designed to contact
skin, polishing cloth contamination caused my wife to develop
allergic sensitization which contributed to the development of
Reynodes 

I have two questions for you, Martin:

  1. I didn’t realize that it was possible to develop a sensitivity to
    nickel - I’ve never reacted badly to it (touch wood), but now you
    have me concerned. I’m unlikely to give up working with nickel
    altogether, as I enjoy the contrast it provides in married-metals
    designs. How much/what type of contact causes a sensitivity to
    develop?

  2. What is Reynodes? I Googled it to no avail.

Thanks for your input!

Jessee Smith
www.silverspotstudio.com
Cincinnati, Ohio


#9
    2. What is Reynodes? I Googled it to no avail. 

Raynaud’s disease. I’ve also seen it spelled Reynaud’s but since
the Mayo Clinic uses the first spelling I’m going with that one. :smiley:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/invoke.cfm?id=DS00433

Sojourner


#10

jessee,

I am aware that some people develop a nickle allergy and the way
they find out is a little rash near their bellybutton from their
jeans button!

I currently have a customer that wants white gold, but also has a
nickle allergy…I chose the palladium white gold that has no nickle
content… with all the different and new metals out there I am sure
that you can find an inexpensive, yet nickle free metal.

-julia potts
julia potts studios


#11

Martin probably meant ‘raynaud’s syndrome.’ If you google ‘raynaud’s
syndrome+nickel’ you’ll get useful info.

David Barzilay
Lord of the Rings
607 S Hill St Ste 850
Los Angeles, CA 90014-1718
213-488-9157


#12

Hi Jesse,

I can answer your question about “Reynodes”-- the correct spelling
is Raynaudes Syndrome, if this is the disease he means. My daughter
has Lupus, and probably Raynaudes, which is common in people with
diseases like Lupus and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Not much is known about this syndrome, except that there is some
sort of interruption of blood flow to the extremities -specially the
fingers and toes. Cold weather can really affect people with this.
Can turn fingertips purple/white/bright red…and can be serious,
leading to gangrene. There is no known cause or cure for this
syndrome, and is one of the diseases for which less is known than
even Lupus, which totally confounds the medical community.

Humans can develop allergies to anything at any time. Multiple
exposures to chemicals, dust, whatever, can result in allergic
reactions to the substance. On an individual basis, reactions can be
mild, moderate, or severe.

I have multiple chemical sensitivities (I think from growing up in
Western MA, next door to some heavy industries) and have to be
careful with what I use or expose myself to while making jewelry.

Many people have allergic reactions to nickel (hives/rashes mostly),
so it is something I wouldn’t use in jewelry that touches the skin.
My daughter can’t wear sterling silver, which is a real bummer, but
a much less common problem.

Hope this answers your questions a little bit.

Nancie
www.moonfishdesign.com


#13

Okay- I missed the original post on this , but “reynodes” got my
attention. I’m not sure what the poster was referring to, but I have
"Raynaud’s Phenomenon" , and from what I have been told, there is
really no way to pin-point why people develop it. For me it involves
fingers and toes that lose circulation when they get the slight bit
cold, either from cold weather, or even in summer, if my feet get
slightly damp… the color goes from my toes, from white, yellow, to
blue in extreme cases. Submersing them in warm water sometimes is
the only way to bring them out of it. (Or wearing those charcoal
heat pads in my shoes, that really works well to prevent it from
happening when I feel it coming on.) It’s a very uncomfortable
feeling, not painful, but cold,dead sort of feeling. I’ve been
assured by my doctor that no damage is being done , just warm them
up and start again! This is probably way more than is
warranted here, but I think it is a rather common condition, and
I’ve been told not much can be done about it. Could have been
precipitated by an old nerve injury, but they say sometimes there is
no specific cause. Sorry if this is off base for the thread…

www.LauraGuptillJewelry.com


#14

I’ve suffered from Raynaud’s for about three years now. Winter is
the worst. That’s why I keep a space heater in my studio and try to
keep my hands warm. While I doesn’t prevent me from working, my
fingers turn white and are really stiff until they warm up. Now it’s
moved to my toes. Oh the agony of aging!

Tammy


#15

Hi Nancie, Jesse, et al,

I’m just returning to the Orchid fold after eight months as a
first-time, full-time dad, but saw your comments on Reynaud’s (or
Raynaud’s) Disease and thought I should add a word or two. FWIW, I’m
44, and have had this condition ever since I was about nine. That
winter, while I was on a backwoods hike with some of my elementary
school classmates, I accepted a dare and promptly fell through the
thin ice of a small pond; by the time we got back to shelter, I was
already exhibiting some of the symptoms of frostbite (fingers
purplish-red, not black), with my fingertips so swollen that they
were shiny.

Ever since then, whenever the ambient temperature dips below 50
degrees Fahrenheit, all color exits my fingers and the tips become
numb and unusable. The diagnosis of Reynaud’s was first made about
twenty years ago. Since then, many of those I’ve met who also have to
deal with this annoying condition have had similar tales of exposure
to tell. I can’t say whether the two are inexorably linked, but the
shock of frostbite seems to have been the precursor in my case, as
well as several of theirs. Has the same been true for any of you?

All the best,
Doug
Douglas Turet, G.J.
Turet Design
P.O. Box 242
Avon, MA 02322-0242
(508) 586-5690
@doug