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Ashanti Casting


#1

Richard O. Martin wrote:

In terms of “gravity” casting, one of the most interesting techniques
that I ever came across was a workshop on ASHANTI CASTING that I hosted.
…(snip) If anybody is interested, I can go into more detail.
Lee Marshall
Bonny Doon Engineering http://www.bonnydoonengineering.com

Lee:

I’m definitely interested in more info

As I mentioned in the original post, I hosted the workshop. Paulette
Werger was the instructor. She learned the technique from Max Frohlich.
She wrote an article that appeared in the Fall 1992 issue of Metalsmith
magazine. (back issues are available. Contact Bob Mitchell at:
rmitchel@cftnet.com).
Briefly, the wax model is invested with a mix of clay and finely chopped
grass, until a layer of about 1/2" is developed. Prior to investing, the
wax is weighed and the appropriate amount of casting grain is set aside.
A sprue is added and when the clay is firm, a cup is formed of clay that
is part of the investment. The metal is placed into the cup and then the
cup is closed over. The metal and the wax are now in a "closed circuit"
container.
The flask is placed in the furnace UPSIDE DOWN! and raised to pouring
temp. At the proper temp., the piece is removed from the furnace with
tongs, gently swirled around to allow any bubbles in the melt to rise to
the surface, and then the flask is turned over and the metal pours down
into the cavity.
I’ve left a lot of stuff out, but this is the general drift of how it
works. For further info, with a very detailed description of the entire
process, get the magazine.

Lee Marshall
Bonny Doon Engineering http://www.bonnydoonengineering.com


#2

At 10:50 PM 11/12/96 +0000, you wrote:

Richard O. Martin wrote:

I’m definitely interested in more info

(snip)

I’ve left a lot of stuff out, but this is the general drift of how it
works. For further info, with a very detailed description of the entire
process, get the magazine.

Lee Marshall

Thanks so much, Lee. I’m always impressed at how dumb our so-called
"primitive" ancestors were. I’ll definitely search out the magazine because
this technique makes a lot of connections to other work that I’ve wondered
about.

Regards,

Rick Martin
MARTIN DESIGNS