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Art Jewelry Mag Nips at Heels of Lapidary Journal


#1

That giant sucking sound you hear is the vacuum left by Lapidary
Journal (as far as this silversmith is concerned, anyway) as it moves
away from featuring articles on fabricating jewelry toward more and
more metal clay and “easy! easy!” beaded jewelry. Meanwhile, Art
Jewelry Magazine, which started out as far more hobbyist-oriented
(heavy on the beading, metal clay and wire wrap) appears to be moving
into the space LJ just vacated. The latest issue has a first rate
article on soldering for beginners, as good as Sara Sanford’s
articles for LJ used to be. And the “Gallery” feature each month
showcases items that are most definitely not produced by hobbyists.

In spite of all my whining here, I still intend to renew my
subscription to LJ. I’m not ready to let go of it yet. But the way
that AJ keeps raising the bar is a very encouraging development.

Mona


#2

Mona, I agree with some of your observations, but personally I was
disappointed with the latest issue of Art Jewelry because of its
strong emphasis on what is a very expensive medium to work with
(unless you like tiny things), viz., metal clay. And, as I mentioned
before, I rarely see things modelled from metal clay that look as
good as the fabricated jewelry I see.

It seems to me that just as the field of polymer clay (very
affordable; no expensive equipment needed) had begun to produce some
really interesting art pieces and effects (rather than just those
teddy bears and gnomes…), magazine projects featuring such
things have faded away.

I still subscribe to both magazines, partly because I’m always
looking for good solderless jewelry projects for my students (since
I teach in a place where I have no torch or storage space). And, I
still see a few things I enjoy for myself.

Judy Bjorkman


#3
Meanwhile, Art Jewelry Magazine, which started out as far more
hobbyist-oriented (heavy on the beading, metal clay and wire wrap)
appears to be moving into the space LJ just vacated. The latest
issue has a first rate article on soldering for beginners, as good
as Sara Sanford's articles for LJ used to be. And the "Gallery"
feature each month showcases items that are most definitely not
produced by hobbyists. 

I was also going to mention this, Mona. Finally a magazine that is
bridging the gap between beading and doing incredibly complex
intarsia or fancy facets. LJ seems to not fill that gap very often
any more, although the last issue had a great article for beginners
by Robert Beauford of Taos.

Many, many craftspeople move from beading to metalsmithing when they
follow the natural urge (feed the creative beast) to learn more
advanced skills such as metalsmithing and lapidary. Many people lack
the time, funds, or opportunities to take classes in these latter
endeavors, and thus I think the great explosion in metal clay and
wire wrapping in lieu of metalsmithing - you can do those at the
kitchen table.

Having a magazine that clearly understands that there’s a whole next
step in the artistic learning process is just super, speaking as a
self-taught metalsmith and lapidary who moved from beads right into
cutting and setting my own stones. I learned quite a bit from that
AMAZING soldering article. Look it up folks, it’s a keeper even for
old hats who develop bad habits!

Roseann


#4
   Meanwhile, Art Jewelry Magazine, which started out as far more
hobbyist-oriented (heavy on the beading, metal clay and wire wrap)
appears to be moving into the space LJ just vacated. The latest
issue has a first rate article on soldering for beginners, as good
as Sara Sanford's articles for LJ used to be. And the "Gallery"
feature each month showcases items that are most definitely not
produced by hobbyists. 

Although, most of the projects in the latest issue are metal clay
projects…but I like the fact that Art Jewelry is geared toward
people who, like me, have some basic metal skills, but are maybe
coming from a beading/wire background and starting to do more
metalsmithing. While most of the fabrication projects in LJ seem to
be geared toward someone more advanced than I am, the fabrication
projects in Art Jewelry seem like things I could tackle. I hope Art
Jewelry continues to have articles for the beginning to intermediate
level of fabrication. I also enjoyed reading the article about
forming a wood bangle - not something I’ve ever thought about
trying, but it’s nice to see some interesting variety in a jewelry
magazine, other than the standard materials and techniques I’m used
to reading about.

– Leah
www.michondesign.com
@Leah2


#5

I received a couple of sample copies of the Art Jewelry magazine. I
thought it was awful. Because I was expecting “art jewelry” not a
bunch of metal and fimo clay projects. At least Lapidary Journal is
about lapidary materials. If the magazine had called itself Clay
Jewelry or Art Clay Jewelry I would have found that easier to
accept. But it is not about Art Jewelry. It’s about clay. I wanted
to be inspired not see a bunch of beginning pmc projects. Truth in
advertising is needed here.

Bottom line, I was very disappointed in it. 8-(

Carla


#6

According to the folks at Art Jewelry, they’re publishing according
to projects submitted.

So if we want to see more projects that AREN’T metal clay (and I’m
among that group) then somebody who knows what they’re doing has to
SUBMIT a project to the magazine.

Please, please, please?

I was happier with the last issue than the one before, but I did
still feel it was heavy on the PMC stuff, which I have less than no
interest in.

Just my opinion, YMMV.
Sojourner


#7
So if we want to see more projects that AREN'T metal clay (and I'm
among that group) then somebody who knows what they're doing has
to SUBMIT a project to the magazine. 

I just wanted to mention that the soldering article was written by a
regular Orchid subscriber and poster “coralnut” Don Dietz.


#8
    So if we want to see more projects that AREN'T metal clay (and
I'm among that group) then somebody who knows what they're doing
has to SUBMIT a project to the magazine. 

I couldn’t agree more! I’ve been a professional writer for 20+
years, and thought I’d get back into freelancing after being in other
types of communications and jewelry . . . Combine the two and write
about jewelry, maybe.

I contacted AJM and got their guidelines and rate schedule, and as I
expected, for an article that you plan, set up the production of the
piece, write, photograph all aspects of production professionally,
and provide resource - all-in-all a good 40 hours of work
at least, they pay $500-600 (I found the guidelines on my computer,
but can’t find the exact pay schedule, which was in an email). It
boils down to 30-50 cents a word or less, and most mags pay $1-2 per
word. Usually I can do low-pay pieces if I can flip them to other
markets, but AJM buys ALL rights - they can rerun it umpteen times
without compensating the writer again, including putting it in a book
or on the web.

So writing for mags like that is often a community service. I’m all
for that! (Just spent the weekend volunteering to teach a bunch of
kids about wildlife.) But right now, I’m not able to spend that much
time for basically compensated for materials and a little time. I’m
sure lots of writers are in the same boat!

Roseann


#9

On the other hand, for those of us who do have a great interest in
PMC, it’s really nice to have a magazine so focused on it as opposed
to the gazillion bead stringing mags.

Also, for those who have only seen the more prevalent simplistic
style of jewelry created with PMC, and are curious to see some
really professional work, try Gordon Uyehara’s site:
http://home.hawaii.rr.com/energies/jewelry.html or Hadar Jacobson’s:
http://www.artinsilver.com/gallery.htm

another 2 cents,
~Jan


#10

Hi, everyone. As the editor of Art Jewelry magazine, I don’t often
have the time to post to websites, but I thought I’d take a moment to
respond to a few of the comments made here about this thread.

In spite of all my whining here, I still intend to renew my
subscription to LJ. I'm not ready to let go of it yet. But the way
that AJ keeps raising the bar is a very encouraging development.

I subscribe to Lapidary Journal, too, Mona. I think they lost their
focus over the past couple of years when they jumped on the beading
bandwagon and began hosting shows and such, but I suspect they will
soon regain their direction. I hope they soon regain the content and
quality they once featured on a regular basis. Perhaps I’m
optimistic, but I think the market can bear two quality publications
dedicated to jewelrymaking.

I agree with some of your observations, but personally I was
disappointed with the latest issue of Art Jewelry because of its
strong emphasis on what is a very expensive medium to work with
(unless you like tiny things), viz., metal clay. And, as I
mentioned before, I rarely see things modelled from metal clay
that look as good as the fabricated jewelry I see. 
I still subscribe to both magazines, partly because I'm always
looking for good solderless jewelry projects for my students
(since I teach in a place where I have no torch or storage space).
And, I still see a few things I enjoy for myself.

Judy, I will admit that the quality of some of the pieces in Art
Jewelry may not be up to the caliber of the average project you see
in some other magazines. Please bear in mind we are a start-up
publication and still in the throes of establishing ourselves in the
marketplace. Any magazine is only as good as the quality of the
submissions it receives. We are working VERY hard at getting
top-notch, innovative projects of every medium other than beading.
Thankfully, artists out there have begun to discover Art Jewelry,
and we are starting to get in some really stellar submissions.

As to polymer clay, I agree with you that some really interesting
pieces have come to light. I’ve contacted a few artists whose work I
thought was amazing, but no nibbles yet. If you have the ear of any
good artist you know, by all means, send them our way!

Having a magazine that clearly understands that there's a whole
next step in the artistic learning process is just super, speaking
as a self-taught metalsmith and lapidary who moved from beads
right into cutting and setting my own stones. I learned quite a
bit from that AMAZING soldering article. Look it up folks, it's a
keeper even for old hats who develop bad habits!

Thanks, Roseann! We appreciate the kind words, and it’s nice to see
that someone recognizes the need for a magazine beyond beading but
before gemcutting. That’s an awfully wide gap, and Art Jewelry is
trying to fill it with publishing a variety of projects geared
toward artists of all levels. (Forgive me if that sounds horribly
commercial, but it is true.)

Although, most of the projects in the latest issue are metal clay
projects...but I like the fact that Art Jewelry is geared toward
people who, like me, have some basic metal skills, but are maybe
coming from a beading/wire background and starting to do more
metalsmithing. While most of the fabrication projects in LJ seem
to be geared toward someone more advanced than I am, the
fabrication projects in Art Jewelry seem like things I could
tackle. I hope Art Jewelry continues to have articles for the
beginning to intermediate level of fabrication. I also enjoyed
reading the article about forming a wood bangle - not something
I've ever thought about trying, but it's nice to see some
interesting variety in a jewelry magazine, other than the standard
materials and techniques I'm used to reading about.<< 

Lapidary Journal features stories on gemcutting and commercial
jewelrymaking, two areas that Art Jewelry currently has no intention
of pursuing. We are content exploring a wide array of media-hence
the story on the wood cuff-and, indeed, our goal is get artists to
think beyond the usual fare. With that said, however, I can tell you
that our magazine is geared toward an equal mix of metal, metal
clay, and wire, with smaller portions of less common media, such as
glass and stone, organics, and enamels/resins/lacquers.

I received a couple of sample copies of the Art Jewelry magazine.
I thought it was awful. Because I was expecting "art jewelry" not
a bunch of metal and fimo clay projects. At least Lapidary Journal
is about lapidary materials. If the magazine had called itself
Clay Jewelry or Art Clay Jewelry I would have found that easier to
accept. But it is not about Art Jewelry. It's about clay. I wanted
to be inspired not see a bunch of beginning pmc projects. Truth in
advertising is needed here. Bottom line, I was very disappointed
in it. 8-( 

Ah, the vagaries of a title! I joined the company after the title
was selected for this magazine, Carla, and I understand your
confusion. “Art jewelry” as a term exists in the industry and
connotes high-end, gallery- or museum-quality jewelry. "Art Jewelry"
the magazine is meant to imply jewelry made using artistic methods.
I admit, we have a ways to go before our title fully conveys our
intentions.

As to our inclusion of metal-clay and polymer-clay projects in our
pages, well, some of them are every bit as artistic as traditional
metalworked pieces. In fact, our July 2005 issue features an
incredible piece by Terri Torbeck (our Associate Editor) that
combines the two mediums in spectacular fashion. These "new-fangled"
mediums may not be your cup of tea, but I happen to find the wide
array of media covered in our magazine endlessly fascinating.

According to the folks at Art Jewelry, they're publishing
according to projects submitted. So if we want to see more
projects that AREN'T metal clay (and I'm among that group) then
somebody who knows what they're doing has to SUBMIT a project to
the magazine. Please, please, please? I was happier with the last
issue than the one before, but I did still feel it was heavy on
the PMC stuff, which I have less than no interest in.

Zen, I completely agree with you that our last issue was a bit heavy
on metal clay. Our July issue (which hits the newsstands first week
in June) will also feel like it has too much metal clay. But Art
Jewelry, as I said above in my response to Judy Bjorkman, is in the
start-up phase: We fill pages with what we’ve got. At the moment, it
happens to be a lot of metal-clay projects.

In Conclusion

I cannot stress enough to the readers of Orchid how much we need
your submissions! It is YOU who shape the content of this magazine,
YOU who give it character and merit. If your jewelry or your
technique is interesting and would be worthwhile to other readers,
please share it. Don’t worry if your writing isn’t stellar-that’s
what my staff and I are here for. We will polish your prose and make
an article worthy of your piece, whether it is composed of
traditional metal, metal clay or polymer clay, or some other medium.

Well, I won’t take up any more time with this thread, but if anyone
wants to email me personally, please do so. I appreciate the
opportunity to respond to all the comments posted here about Art
Jewelry. Thank you!

Dori

Dori Olmesdahl, Editor
Art Jewelry Magazine


#11
    all-in-all a good 40 hours of work at least, they pay $500-600
(I found the guidelines on my computer, but can't find the exact
pay schedule, which was in an email). 

If I could get paid $15 an hour for doing something I love (and I do
love to write), I’d take it in a heartbeat.

Too bad I don’t know enough about jewelry making to write something
up for them - that’s better than what I bring home in a month.

Guess it all depends on your perspective…

Sojourner
Keeping in mind that it IS a new mag with shaky readership
numbers…


#12

In response to Dori Olmsdahl’s post to Orchid, I want to say ‘thank
you’ to Dori for so much for taking the time to post such an
excellent, well-thought response to some of the opinions expressed on
the Orchid forum, which is a priceless resource for jewelry
professionals as well as for those who want to market to jewelry
professionals. Dori - you are at the helm of an exciting new
publication that is generating much interest - great job!

You will see my later response to the problem of pay for writers.
This is a very old problem: how can we afford to create wonderful
articles for a wonderful publication, if the pay is not commensurate
with time spent on the piece?

This is a problem not just with writing but with all art. There are
ALWAYS those who can afford to spend lots of time writing for
publications that can’t, for whatever reasons, pay a living wage to
its contributors; many writers (or jewelers or painters or
potters…) have spouses whose jobs pay the big bills, or who enjoy
retirement or other income that floats them while they pursue writing
or other arts.

This causes an overall depression in pay rates for writers or in
prices for quality jewelry, for example. I recall a few years ago
reading an article in a jewelry magazine featuring fantastic jewelry
with reticulated sterling and gemstone centerpieces and lavish
beadword. But the artist said she sells them for “a few hundred
dollars” because she just wants to make up her materials costs and
then make enough to buy more beads at the Tucson shows…these are
pieces that a jewelry professional would charge over $800-1000 for. I
was so mad to read this!

Probably I just opened a can of worms, but this is a subject that is
a sore spot with me - when people allow their work to be undervalued,
or who undervalue their own work, this causes the rest of us to
suffer . . . No wonder most freelance writers (dare I say "real"
ones) or jewelry professionals can’t pay their own health insurance,
put sufficient funds aside for retirement, etc.

An Orchid member has since pointed out that he’d love to work for
$15 an hour doing writing - but I can’t do that, even though I live
in a very affordable place (Tucson). Add it up. At $15 an hour it’s
not possible to support a professional business with your own health
insurance, retirement, mortgage, overhead, etc. Pay for writers has
not changed since the 1970s. Most writers have advanced degrees, the
equivalent of master jewelers, and should be paid commensurately -
it’s a tough job.

And I guess my point is: Why should writers or artists HAVE to take
low pay because it’s something they love or because the pay is
depressed by others who will do it cheaply?

Enough ranting!! Thanks for letting me blow steam :wink:

Roseann


#13
But it is not about Art Jewelry. It's about clay. I wanted to be
inspired not see a bunch of beginning pmc projects.

Not sure which issues you received as samples, Carla, but among the
PMC articles in recent issues was one featuring the work of Ivy
Solomon, who won the 2004 Saul Bell Design Award for her work.
Hardly what I’d call a “beginner.” One of the first issues, which
came out in April 2004, featured an elaborate PMC pod pendant
embellished with keum-boo and gold wire. I’d previously thought of
PMC as a “quick and dirty” medium, but the care and workmanship
involved in constructing this piece took care of that misconception!

Recent issues have featured many articles involving PMC, but there
have also been ones on wire-wrapping, knitting Viking chain,
fabrication, and other topics. While I would still like to see more
articles aimed at the advanced metalworker (more like those early
issues), Art Jewelry does have a lot to offer. Why not give it
another chance?

[Usual disclaimer]

Cheers,

Jessee Smith
www.silverspotstudio.com
Cincinnati, Ohio


#14

At the risk of irritating a number of people, I’m very happy to have
a magazine that DOESN’T focus on beads! Jewelry is many things, and I
believe you’re seeing such a large amount of metal clay articles
because it is a brand new medium (outside of Japan, that is). You
can’t possibly expect every magazine to contain everything each of us
is interested in.

To the person who objected to the metal clay content because it’s an
expensive medium…have you priced out the cost of casting silver
jewelry? The equipment, the tools, the time…I can produce a one of
a kind, carved ring with a gemstone setting in Art Clay Silver in
less than 3 hours, and I dare you to distinguish it from a similar,
“fabricated” ring. Any jewelry, using any medium, can only reflect
the skill of its maker. If you get a chance to look at any of the Art
Clay books produced in Japan, you’ll see jewelry that will take your
breath away, in design, execution and polish.

I think Art Jewelry magazine is off to a fabulous start, and when LJ
returns to its gemstone roots, I’ll be very happy.

Jackie


#15

My biggest ovation for AJM is for their diligence in portraying the
medium of “metal clay” rather than PMC or Art Clay Silver. It’s
very, very refreshing to read an entire issue and see projects listed
without mention of a particular brand. Metal clay techniques are
non-partisan, and I applaud AJM for focusing on the commonality.

Jackie


#16
Keeping in mind that it IS a new mag with shaky readership
numbers.... 

Actually, they have a subscription base of 45,000. I don’t call
that shaky.

Elaine
Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#17
And I guess my point is: Why should writers or artists HAVE to take
low pay because it's something they love or because the pay is
depressed by others who will do it cheaply? 

One reason is because everyone and their cousin is now a “jewelry
artist” (just look at all the jewelry magazines out there on the
shelves with step-by-step how tos and all the craze over PMC) and a
huge portion of those do it as a hobby. The people I know that do
this as a hobby have husbands with middle to mostly high income and
they picked up jewelry making as a hobby. I know some that are
thrilled to make back their materials plus about $10 - for hours and
hours of work. In all reality, if they actually figured it out - they
are probably taking huge losses on each and every piece. Why?
Because they don’t have to rely on it as a business to make income.
There are probably more people that fall into the hobby jeweler
category now than there are artists that rely on their work as their
main source of income. It’s a huge problem - but what do you do?
Sometimes I think there are more instructors out there teaching than
artists out there selling. It’s a completely oversaturated market.


#18
    And I guess my point is: Why should writers or artists HAVE to
take low pay because it's something they love or because the pay is
depressed by others who will do it cheaply? 

But you really don’t want to know the answer. The BUYER ALWAYS
establishes the VALUE. Your task is to find the kind of buyers you
want buying at whatever price you become willing to make the deal at
and you want to STAY AWAY from the lower paying buyers. (And what
magazine buyers and the advertisers in the magazine are willing to
pay for space ads are all factored into what the editors are willing
to pay for writing----and as long as their are people who WILLINGLY
make that trade for their writing effort why shouldn’t the editors
pay only that?)

The reason minimum wage laws (and usually price fixing and other
market distortions) ALWAYS have the long run OPPOSITE effect from
what they intend is that they NEVER change the BUYER’s VALUE point so
the buyer ALWAYS ends up choosing something else (even nothing) that
suits their value requirements. Sure, a few benefit for a while from
the distortion but the overall effect decreases the level total GDP
would have reached absent the distortion.

James E. White
Inventor, Marketer, and Author of “Will It Sell? How to Determine If
Your Invention Is Profitably Marketable (Before Wasting Money on a
Patent)” Info Sites: www.willitsell.com www.inventorhome.com,
www.idearights.com www.taletyano.com www.booksforinventors.com


#19

I used to hate the quality of the PMC pieces that I saw in
magazines. They looked totally unprofessional because of their
horrible finishes. They looked like dried Play-dough that was spray
painted silver. I thought the problem must be the material itself
but the links listed on Orchid and a few pieces in recent magazines
have shown me that this is not the case and there are a few people
who understand the importance of a good clean finish. Those people
will raise the standards for everyone now, I hope.

    tools, the time...I can produce a one of a kind, carved ring
with a gemstone setting in Art Clay Silver in less than 3 hours,
and I dare you to distinguish it from a similar, "fabricated" ring.
Any jewelry, using any 

It’s true that there is no way, that I know of, to carve a wax,
invest it and burn it out in a kiln in less than 3 hours. Just the
investment drying time and burnout time require way more time than
that and I certainly spend MANY more than 3 hours carving an
intricate wax. I don’t cast in in silver unless the customer
understands they are mostly paying for labor anyway and that the
details of the piece will wear out faster than in gold.

I understand that PMC fills a gap but what concerns me is the fact
that PMC is still basically fine silver rather than sterling isn’t
it?

I can’t tell you how many sterling silver rings I have repaired.
Some have been almost brand new. They bend, they break, they wear
out quickly compared to gold. I cringe at the idea of someone
bringing me a fine silver PMC ring that needs work. And I know this
will happen eventually. And what about the bales that are part of a
PMC pendant? Geez, sterling bales are always wearing out! Do
customers who buy these pieces understand what they are buying?
Often they do not. Most are shocked and dissapointed with the
sterling jewelry they bring me and it is certainly harder than fine
silver. For that reason I would not consider using PMC except for
specific uses where the parts would not get daily wear and tear.

And I do subscribe to Art Jewelry Magazine although I may not do so
again. It is filling a niche…so far it’s just filling not mine.
I’ll probably look at each issue and buy one if it does interest me.

Jennifer
Highland Goldsmiths
NW Mulino


#20

I think Roseann Hanson has a valid point that writing for magazine
publications is done mainly for the love of the art, but it doesn’t
take long before the novelty wears off and practicality sets in.
I’ve written quite a few technical articles for trade journals
through the years. It takes hours to pare the writing down to the
bare minimum for publication purposes, make it easy enough to
understand for those who have constraints in either language or
skill, do the drawings or the photos; and in the end, I make less
than what I get for sizing a half-dozen rings, which would only take
a couple of hours, tops.

A magazine retains ALL publishing rights, even though they sell back
issues, electronic and hard copy reprints, and republish the same
article in a special issue several years later. Even though I wrote
the article, I own nothing and cannot republish myself. And it’s a
nightmare trying to get photocopies of the articles I’ve written to
go into workshop or resume’ packets from Kinko’s.

If a magazine wants high quality projects to publish, from those who
are knowledgeable in the field, in order to promote their magazine
as being on the forefront in an area, then they need to reconsider
how they go about paying for their submissions. Starting pay for a
technical writer starts at $60 U.S./hr. A general writer is paid per
word, but they can resubmit their stories repeatedly, as long as
they aren’t running concurrently with another publication, except in
the instance of newspaper journalism. However, a magazine looking
for project submissions pays next to nothing, and they wonder why
they don’t get more/better submissions. If it comes down to doing
real work at the bench that pays a decent wage or submitting an
article, well…let’s just say I wasn’t born stupid and my momma
didn’t drop me on my head enough to make me stupid. OK, OK, so she
did drop me on my head a few times and my sister did shut my head in
the car door a few times.

Art Jewelry has the potential to be a great magazine, and has got
off on a good foot. I’m impressed with the quality so far, and it
does seem to be plugging up that hole that LJ left. I like the
variety, even though not all of the projects are in my focus or
interests. In a perfect world, it would be nice if there was a
magazine that presents technical articles that addresses a variety
of skill levels, from the rank amateur to the bench professional.
I’d like to see someone just starting out be able to open a magazine
and start with the simple projects, and after a few more issues, be
able to attempt a project a little above what they have previously
learned, and in the process keep adding to their skill sets.
Something to foster their education and to keep them growing. For
the old fogeys, I’d like to see slick tricks that make things go
easier, better or faster.

When it comes right down to it, all of us began with simple things,
and grew as our skill sets grew. We all started at the bottom and
worked our way up. Presently, we have publications that address
either–this is what anyone can do at the kitchen table–or you have
to be quite advanced in your bench skills. We don’t have anything
that goes from the one extreme to the other, something that bridges
the gap inbetween and educates us, to make us stretch in our skills
and design. That’s a huge niche, not to mention it has a high
probability of expanding the audience outside of the U.S.

Orchid is an excellent example. Remember when Orchid first began?
Back in 1995 or 1996, it probably only had around 100 members, and
look at how it’s grown! Look at the scope of subjects covered, from
technical to suppliers. Hanuman is a leader in what can
be accomplished with dedication and a clear vision. It evolved to
serve the needs of this community, and it keeps growing.

So, Dori, Art Jewelry has a great beginning. After reading all these
posts, I hope you realize it has even greater potential and the
means to attain phenomenal success. However, you’re going to have to
offer enough renumeration or benefits to those who really attract
people to your audience, in order that they won’t suffer burnout.
Treat the writers nice, and you’ll never lack for good articles.
Have good articles and you’ll never lack for avid readers.

Katherine Palochak