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Arctic Fox anti tarnish silver


#1

Since there has been a recent thread about anti-tarnish (or should
that be tarnish-resistant?) silver, I’d like to know if anyone has
had any experience with working in the Arctic Fox so-called
anti-tarnish silver from Umicore Precious metals?

If so, is it as good or as bad as any of the other new silver alloys
on the market? Is it as white as Argentium? Does it fuse well? Does
it need/can one heat harden it? According to the company’s blurb, of
course, it’s probably the best thing since sliced bread, but any
info from personal experience would be most welcome.

Janet


#2

Hi Ja

Since there has been a recent thread about anti-tarnish (or should
that be tarnish-resistant?) silver, I'd like to know if anyone
hashad any experience with working in the Arctic Fox so-called
anti-tarnish silver from Umicore Precious metals? 

net, I was all set to order some when I read the Material Safety
Data Sheet on it.

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/ep820i [PDF file]

Silver Fox contains Silver, Copper, Zinc and Indium.

The section on fume fever while soldering gave me pause to reflect.
I know MSDS are written up to be scary as can be, however given
degree of exposure when you combine soldering, sanding, polishing
exposure I just didn’t want to deal with it.

SECTION 5 - REACTIVITY DATA

Chemical Stability: Product is stable under normal ambient working
conditions generally involves melting. Avoid adding any amount of
water to molten metal, as an explosion may result. Ensure all cast
items are completely solid before water quenching.

Hazardous Decomposition Products: If heated to excess in the molten
state, metal fumes may be liberated. It is strongly recommended that
casters avoid exposing this alloy to temperatures above 1010 oC.

Route of Entry: Inhalation or skin contact during use. Skin contact
in form supplied.

Effects of Acute Exposure to Material:

Inhalation of freshly formed fume may cause metal fume fever.
Initial symptoms may include dryness and irritation of the throat.
Several hours after exposure signs may include a metallic taste in
the mouth, headache, fever, chills, excessive sweating, muscle
pains, nausea, vomiting and weakness. Recovery from symptoms
reportedly occurs within 48 hrs. Metal fume is reportedly not
generally fatal.

Skin contact with metal pieces: dermatitis is generally not expected
with this alloy. Should it occur, wash area thoroughly with soap and
water and wear gloves.

efficiency particulate filter (NIOSH APPROVED). When soldering or
brazing, consult the MSDS for the solder or brazing alloy to ensure
ventilation is suitable. References include the current version of
CSA STD. Z94.4 Selection, Care and Use of Respirator

Aurora


#3
The section on fume fever while soldering gave me pause to
reflect. 

This happens only “If heated to excess in the molten state”. No
different than any other metal alloy. Have adequate ventilation, and
try not to boil it.

Al Balmer


#4

Thanks for that info Al - so would making granules on a charcoal
block, heating until the ball is spinning qualify as ‘excess in
molten state’. Granted a granule isn’t going to fume a lot, however
I go on marathons of melting scrap pieces for granules, working at
it for an hour or more.

I use a 600-800 cfm exhaust fan with an 8 inch flexible pipe down to
the soldering station. I should be Ok, still I like to work as
non-toxic as possible.

Aurora