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Altitude and annealing?


#1

I live at 6,000 feet above sea level. It takes me longer to boil
and bake things. Is it possible that annealing and other heating
procedures would be affected by this altitude? Would they be
slower? Or am I just imagining things?

Tracey


#2

I don’t think altitude would make a difference in annealing and
other heating. The difference that it makes in baking and boiling is
based on the fact that water boils at a lower temperature because of
the lesser air pressure. Since annealing and the like has nothing to
do with water it shouldn’t be affected.

Janet Kofoed


#3

Tracey,

I moved from WY and a mile high to sea level in VA. I don’t notice
any difference in annealing time but it sure took longer to bake
potatoes and boil eggs in WY. I used to live in Ecuador at 9,200
feet; it took forever to get the charcoal warm enough to grill
anything, everything cooled off in an instant and it took my
enameling kiln an extra half hour to reach the correct temp, so
probably some heating procedures are affected.

Donna in VA


#4

Hi Tracey,

re your comment

   I live at 6,000 feet above sea level.  It takes me longer to
boil  and bake things.  Is it possible that annealing and other
heating procedures would be affected by this altitude?  Would they
be slower?  Or am I just imagining things? 

The question takes me back to grade 12 physics

P1T1=P2T2. If you were able to create a vacuum, you could find that
water would boil at room temperature, say 20 deg C. Things don’t
cook very well at that heat. Alternatively, if you use a pressure
cooker and not let the water boil at standard atmospheric pressure
then the water temperature must rise to boil. I’ve been told that
mountain climbers bring along small pressure cookers so that at high
altitudes they can cook the food.

So what we are talking about is the boiling point of liquids. The
boilling points of gold silver and copper are respectively 2,807,
2,212, & 2,567 deg C respectively; values so high that a change in
pressure lowering the bp is marginal.

Thus the question now is does the lower pressure influence the
formation of large crystals from small crystals. Given the relative
high melting points of the metals, it’s unlikely or at least
marginal. But I could be mistaken.

David


#5

It will effect the boiling point — but this will not be
noticeable in any thing you do.

jesse


#6
I don't think altitude would make a difference in annealing and
other heating. The difference that it makes in baking and boiling is
based on the fact that water boils at a lower temperature because of
the lesser air pressure. Since annealing and the like has nothing to
do with water it shouldn't be affected.

As far as the metal goes you won’t see a difference but your fuel-
atmospheric air torch will not burn as well, giving off less heat
with a more reducing flame. You will get less air ( oxygen ) in
the mix so combustion is poorer. Problems with an electric kiln in
a less developed country are more likely due to a low or erratic
line voltage .

jesse