Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Alternative to Liver of Sulfur


#1
To make a gun power you need Potassium Nitrate, not Potassium
Chlorate; addition of sugar will not do anything, you need
charcoal for that." 

I would never claim that I know anything about this first hand…,
but do you have empirical data that sugar will not work in place
of charcoal? hmmmmm…

The best I can say here is DON’T try it to find out… John Burgess’
comment

Just by grinding the compounds together may well lose you a hand
and mess up your face! I KNOW!!!

is accurate worth taking note. (Thanks John.)

Should we really be discussing fireworks on a jewelry forum? It
seems like semantics and inaccurate chemistry formulas/names can be
the cause of a pretty good pyrotechnical display in responses. This
is not without good reason. For those who cannot discern when the
chemistry is off by a mile may find themselves at risk. Others who
know will step in to provide caution. For that I am grateful.

What I enjoy most about this forum is the dedicated problem solving
being shared with those people having a need and by
those who genuinely know solutions to those problems from experience
and deal in facts; not casual or irresponsible input. I cherish this
exchange and have never found its equal anywhere else. Let’s
continue.

J Collier
Small Scale Metalsmith
http://jlcollier.com


#2

Here is the reason why sugar will not work:

Sugar is primary a glucose.

Glucose formula is C6H12O6

The mole of glucose is 12 * 6 + 1 * 12 + 16 * 6 = 180 grams, but
only 72 grams of which is carbon and the rest is plain water.

Gun power is a mechanical mixture which derives is explosive
properties from releasing energy stored in nitrogen bonds of the
potassium nitrate.

You need pure carbon for that and in sugar carbon is bound to a
water molecule.

To answer your another question about empirical data; the answer is
no, I do not have any empirical data.

Empirical - means " as a result of practical observations ".

I do not find it productive to engage in experiments for which there
is no scientific under-pinnings.

However, I am always eager to learn, and if you are aware of some
mechanism which would make sugar an equal substitute for carbon, I
will gladly amend my remarks.


#3
Sugar is primary a glucose. Glucose formula is C6H12O6 

Not so, Table Sugar is Sucrose (also called saccharose) It is a
disaccharide (glucose + fructose) with the molecular formula
C12H22O11.

Back to jewelry making…

Mark H


#4
Not so, Table Sugar is Sucrose (also called saccharose) It is a
disaccharide (glucose + fructose) with the molecular formula
C12H22O11. 

You are correct, but it does not change the fact that sugar is not a
substitute for carbon. And I agree with you that there is too much
chemistry in this thread anyway


#5

The January 2005 issue has a good article on patinas, and includes a
sidebar for using a boiled egg in a jar. Boil and peel an egg, put
egg and jewelry piece in a jar with a tight lid and wait. It can take
up to three days to get the patina you want. I used this method for
the first piece I patined and it is still a lovely color.

Priscilla Fritsch
LuckyDog Designs


#6
Here is the reason why sugar will not work: <snip>

Times have changed.

When I was in high school (late 50’s) there was an article in
Popular Science or Mechanics Illustrated giving directions on how to
make your own rocket, including instructions on how to make the
fuel. Sugar was melted in a pan on the stove and sodium nitrate was
stirred into it. While the mixture was still molten it was poured
into the rocket body. I tried making a couple of them (my parents
thought it was okay since I was just following a magazine article).
I was lucky, nothing bad happened and the stuff sparked and fizzed
like crazy when lit. The smoke smelled sweet and the rockets went
nowhere. Still, it was a lot of dumb fun for a 14 or 15 year old
kid.

John
John Winters