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[again] torch/acetlyne v. oxy acetelyne


#1

It was suggested to me recently that I switch from my Prestolite
torch used on my B Acetelyne tank to the “Little Torch” using
oxy-acetelyne, the reason sited as being faster and hotter. My
pieces generally require multiple soldering. Anybody have any
thoughts or reccommendations? (I’m really just getting started
and could use the money elsewhere) Thanks!


#2

Ah, it?s the old Presto-Lite versus gas/oxygen. I think that a
lot depends on what you use it for. I work in silver and
fabricate my jewelry. I also do an occasional spoon and candy
dish. For my purposes, the Presto-Lite works fine. If you work in
gold and do things like retipping prongs, you may need the
gas/oxygen setup.

Marilyn Smith


#3

It was suggested to me recently that I switch from my Prestolite
torch used on my B Acetelyne tank to the “Little Torch” using
oxy-acetelyne, the reason sited as being faster and hotter. My
pieces generally require multiple soldering. Anybody have any
thoughts or reccommendations? (I’m really just getting started
and could use the money elsewhere) Thanks!

I got along with acetelyne for years and finally got a little
torch using oxygen and propane when I started soldering gold. I
love it! I do multiple solderings too and its easier to solder
in a tight spot, also cleaner. Soooo whenever you can afford it
its worth it. Jan


#4
  It was suggested to me recently that I switch from my
Prestolite torch used on my B Acetelyne tank to the "Little
Torch" using oxy-acetelyne, the reason sited as being faster
and hotter.  My pieces generally require multiple soldering. 
Anybody have any thoughts or reccommendations?  (I'm really
just getting started and could use the money elsewhere)  

I use the Prestolite with the “B” tank and wouldn’t switch! A
friend of mine was using a “Little Torch” using oxy/propane and
she was constantly having problems soldering . . . I finally
talked her into using a Prestolite that she had in her basement.

I guess it’s all what one gets used to!


#5

The little torch is best suited for working on gold alloys
because of its flame size range. While the flame is much hotter,
it is smaller. I recommend oxy-propane as opposed to acetylene,
acetylene has several characteristics that make it a less
desirable fuel.

The extreme conductivity of silver necessitates preheating the
entire piece while soldering. A large, soft, cooler flame is
better for this. The prestolite, while producing a cooler but
larger flame is a better choice for medium to larger sterling
pieces. If you get a chance to use a “little torch”, you will
quickly see its limitations. It is great for gold, however.

This past summer our studio hosted Rhoda Harris, an enthusiastic
84 year old jeweler who does granulation in 22k. She had
difficulties using the “little torch”- she does her work with a
trinket kiln and a prestolite- there again a larger, cooler
flame gives a lot more control during the fusing process. Luckily
there was a prestolite in the studio. (The trinket kiln preheats
the piece).

There are always new tools to buy- my latest “how did I live
without it tool” is a tubing cutter. The one before it was the
jump ring cutter.

Rick Hamilton
Richard D. Hamilton
Martha’s Vineyard
USA
Fabricated 14k, 18k, and platinum Jewelry
wax carving, modelmaking, jewelry photography

http://www.rick-hamilton.com


#6

I was in the same situation years ago. Soldered a copper tube
into the nozzle of the smallest Prestolite I had and was able to
do small gold work. Then bought a Little Torch and kicked myself
for not doing it sooner. Little Torch for gold and small silver
work using #5 tip and big brushy flame and Prestolite for all
other silverwork works for me.

Jerry,
Dark Island
Kodiak, Ak
Dark Island, Kodiak, Alaska


#7
 Little Torch for gold and small silver 

I have several other torches which can be used for small sliver
work . . . one is the Burnzomatic (pencil) torch -it’s tiny and
puts out enough heat (propane) to do links for chain. The other
is a Weller silversmith torch -larger tip, also propane, for
things that are not so big. But, I still use the Prestolite
almost exclusively. I may, someday, purchase a Little Torch.


#8
     It was suggested to me recently that I switch from my
Prestolite torch used on my B Acetelyne tank to the "Little
Torch" using oxy-acetelyne, the reason sited as being faster
and hotter.  My pieces generally require multiple soldering. 

Both torches have their uses. If you’re working mostly with
silver, especially larger pieces, the Prestolite (with a good tip
assortment) is good. If you’re working with smaller items & in
gold then the Little Torc h has an edge. The Prestolite (actually
any acetylene-air) torch with it’s larger tips provides a larger
’quantity’ of heat than Little Torch. Little Torch (any oxy/acet)
produces a hotter flame but due to the tip size the quantity of
heat is much less than Prestolite. There’s alot of good wotk done
by folks using each. The success rate depends on the type of work
& the users skill.

Dave


#9

hi, i love my little torch, ive been using it for about 20 years.
one will require a larger torch for casting or melting ingots,
but i find it pretty versatile if one has all the tips
available.

if i were to ever use acetylene again it would be in conjunction
with the prestolite, a great air and gas torch. however i have
proven (to myself anyway) that acetylene is not at all
neccessary or any less dangerous than propane. propane is plenty
hot enough to do any type of jewelry work, including casting
platinum. it is much celaner burning as well and doesn’t cause
(as much) shmutz to bind with ones metal.

i endorse a propane/oxy set up.

best regards,

geo fox