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[again] soldering gold to silver


#1

Hello,

what should I use when soldering parts of gold to silver jewelry

  • gold or silver solder?

Sabine

sabineas virtual gallery
metal design, jewelry & silverwork
http://www.sabinea.com/


#2
  what should I use when soldering parts of gold to silver
jewelry - gold or silver solder?   

I’ve used both. I try to match the base (be it sterling, or
gold) . . . that way, if you get a blotch, at least it matches
and is not quite so unsightly.


#3

Hi Sabine,

You have to use silver solder when soldering silver and gold
together since most gold solders flow at temperatures above the
flow point of sterling. when you do this though, be very careful
about the silver solder flowing onto the gold as it will leave a
noticeable mark that is difficult to get rid of. If the
situation allows it, you might try melting the solder onto the
silver then sweat soldering to the gold. This should minimize
the flow of solder away from the joint and onto the gold. MP


#4

That depends on how much soldering you are going to do. Usually
I try to start with gold soldering and then switch to silver when
there are multiple solderings. But it also depends on how heavy
the silver is vs. how heavy the gold piece is. You need to play
around with what you are trying to build and see which works
best.


#5

silver solder is appropriate as gold would be difficult to clean
if it flowed beyond the joint… Ringman John


#6

Is it possible to explain briefly to a total neophyte what sweat
soldering is? I say briefly bec. I’m sure most people don’t
need to take time w. this. I assume it’s not exactly the same
as sweat equity… ??? thanks RYr


#7

solder application to either the body piece or most common the
attachment, then heat the metal well fluxed and reach the
metlting point of the solder the solder will tend to flow only
from the attachment to the body leaving a tight clean joint. The
amount of solder used determines the result…John the
ringman


#8

Is it possible to explain briefly to a total neophyte what sweat
soldering is? I say briefly bec. I’m sure most people don’t
need to take time w. this. I assume it’s not exactly the same
as sweat equity… ??? thanks RYr

In sweat soldering, you apply the solder to one of the two
sufraces to be joined using just enough heat to join the solder
to the surface. You don’t want it to flow much. File the solder
down slightly to get it even. Flux both pieces to be joined and
hold them in contact with each other. heat the pieces, putting a
little extra heat on the side where there is no solder applied,
so that the solder will flow toward the greater heat, thus
joining the pieces together. In plumbing, solder is usually
applied to both surfaces, but I don’t think this is usual in
jewelry.


#9
Is it possible to explain briefly to a total neophyte what sweat
soldering is?   I say briefly bec. I'm sure most people don't
need to take time w. this.   I assume it's not exactly the same
as sweat equity

FIRST run around the block 7 times, then do 30 pushups, then sit
in a hot steamy bathroom , then solder…no serioulsy its
simple. Say you have a triangle of flat metal and want to solder
it to a larger disk of metal. Lay the triangle down and put a few
snips of solder on it. Heat the triangle until the solder melts,
flooding the surface. You can use something to help the solder
spread like a solder pick if you want. Then you take the
triangle and place it on your larger piece of metal. The entire
two pieces are heated and the solder flows joining the two pieces
cleanly, that is unless you put too much solder on the triangle.
This can be heated from above on a charcoal block or from below
on a soldering stand. Not sure why its call "sweat"
soldering…Dave

Crystalguy Jewelry, the first art jewelry site on the net
http://www.opendoor.com/stephensdesign/crystalguy.html
Art jewelry with a mystic touch / Now accepting credit cards


#10

Sweat soldering is just another way of saying the whole object
which you are soldering together is heated at the same rate and
temperature to create conduction so the solder will flow all at
once.

Russ


#11

Personally, I have had the best luck doing this simply butting
the pieces togh. making sure they fit tightly and applying very
little solder to the back surface. This way it tends to flow
evenly and does not flow to the front surfaces. Makes a nice
clean seam. This is especially true when soldering two different
color metals together.

Best;
Steve


#12

It’s called “sweat” soldering because in the old time plumbing
applications, using the gasoline torches etc.–you know, way way
back there in the dark ages–the flux actually “sweated” out the
water content before the solder would grab/hold. So my dad told
me once. Sharon H.